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Nazi War Crimes

NEWS
August 22, 1988 | United Press International
The U.S. attorney's office said today that it is suing to revoke the citizenship of an elderly Minneapolis man it accuses of participating in Nazi war crimes during World War II, and then deport him. Edgars Inde, 79, allegedly belonged to a commando unit known as the Latvian Auxiliary Police. The organization assisted the Nazis in the persecution and killing of unarmed Jews and other civilians.
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NEWS
May 28, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To his supporters, Ivan Timofeyevich Polyukhovich was a simple pensioner, a gray-haired, ailing Ukrainian immigrant of 76 who tends bees and a neat vegetable garden in northwest Adelaide. To prosecutors, however, Polyukhovich was a mass murderer. They charged him with involvement in the massacre of about 850 people from the Jewish ghetto of Serniki in Nazi-occupied Ukraine in 1942. If convicted, he could have faced life in prison. For nine weeks, the jurors heard grisly testimony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1994
Germany's highest appeals court has ruled that the leader of a far-right party did not violate the law against inciting racial hatred when he endorsed another person's claim that Jews were not exterminated in Nazi death camps. Given German law, this was an irresponsible decision, condemned by both liberal and conservative voices in Germany. And it comes at a time when neo-fascism is becoming increasingly prominent across much of Europe.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz apparently has decided to snub Austrian President Kurt Waldheim during a scheduled visit to Vienna next week to attend a European security conference. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said Shultz has no plans to make a courtesy visit to Waldheim, who was elected chief of state earlier this year despite charges that he was involved in Nazi war crimes while serving as a junior officer in the German army in World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
David H. Popper, 95, a career foreign service officer who became U.S. ambassador to Chile months after Gen. Augusto Pinochet overthrew socialist President Salvador Allende, died July 24 at Georgetown University Hospital of complications from a fall. Popper arrived in Santiago in 1974 and spent the next three years balancing U.S. policy to support anti-Communist military regimes against public demands from Congress and humanitarian groups that the Chilean junta stop killing, jailing and torturing its political foes.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A court convicted a 93-year-old former security police commander Wednesday of taking part in the mass murder of more than 200,000 Jews in Lithuania during World War II. It was the first time since the collapse of the Soviet Union that a local collaborator has been convicted of a Holocaust crime in one of the now-independent former Soviet republics.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
The British government came under fierce pressure Tuesday to rescue Nazi war crimes legislation thrown out by the House of Lords. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, facing angry lawmakers in the House of Commons, said she recognized "the extremely strong feelings because of the hideous nature of these crimes."
NEWS
November 16, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
When four police officers approached the old man on a rainy street this week, it was as though he had been expecting them. A flight that lasted nearly four decades had ended. "Well, the hunt is over. I will not try to run," the old man said, according to Pedro Aybar, the arresting officer. Argentine police announced Friday that they have arrested Nazi war crimes suspect Walter Kutschmann, 72, on an extradition warrant from West Germany.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's most famous Nazi war crimes suspect, Aleksandras Lileikis, who for years frustrated efforts by international Jewish groups to bring him to justice, has died in his homeland. He was 93. Lileikis, whose trial was suspended repeatedly because of his poor health, was rushed to a hospital after a heart attack, his lawyer, Algirdas Matuiza, told the Baltic News Service.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | Associated Press
Israel has enough evidence to put former U.N. Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim on trial for involvement in Nazi war crimes, Justice Minister Yitzhak Modai said today. His statement to Israel radio was Israel's strongest yet about allegations that Waldheim covered up his activities with the German army during World War II. Modai told Israel radio that a Justice Ministry investigation ordered by Prime Minister Shimon Peres had found Waldheim indirectly responsible for war crimes in the Balkans.
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