Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNazis
IN THE NEWS

Nazis

ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By David Ng
The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra has garnered a loyal television audience around the world with its annual New Year's concert broadcasts, which air in the U.S. on PBS. But this New Year's celebration was somewhat marred by attacks made on the orchestra concerning its past sympathies to the Nazi party. The venerated orchestra has also found itself under renewed attacks for being the least diverse musical ensemble in the western world in terms of race and gender equality. In past years, the orchestra has been picketed during overseas tours by those who perceive its practices to be discriminatory.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013 | By Bob Pool
His escape from the Nazis was more like "Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory" than "The Sound of Music," Leon Prochnik admits. Prochnik was 6 when his family fled Poland as Hitler's army invaded the country. As they were smuggled out of the country, they left behind a luxurious life made possible by their Krakow chocolate-making business. "There was this big, giant tub of chocolate in the factory" that was used in Milka candy bars, Prochnik said. "When nobody was looking, I'd stick my arm in up to my elbow and then lick off the chocolate.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1988
I don't know whether Errol Flynn collaborated with the Nazis or not (Calendar Letters, Aug. 7), but it's my understanding that Flynn was well known in his time for his indulgence in wine, women and song. If the Nazis actually did go out of their way to hire this man, all I can say is it's no wonder they lost the war. RUDY MINGER Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Art experts this week are being trained as treasure hunters so they can discover works that once had been stolen by the Nazis. In an international effort to reclaim millions of pieces lost or looted by Nazis or others during World War II, 35 officials from museums, auction houses and government agencies from a dozen countries are learning to look out for plundered pieces at the six-day Provenance Research Training Program in Germany that ends...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2010 | By KENNETH TURAN, Film Critic
If you know the name Rezso Kasztner, you won't need any encouragement to see "Killing Kasztner: The Jew Who Dealt With Nazis." If you don't, that is even more reason to see this documentary on the strange and compelling life and death of one of the most morally complex figures to come out of the Holocaust. From one point of view, Kasztner sounds like a classic hero. He negotiated face to face with Adolf Eichmann for the freedom of Hungarian Jews, a process that eventually resulted in a rescue train that brought 1,684 Jews to the safety of Switzerland.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
A 17th century book seized by the Nazis has been returned to Rome's Jewish community, one of thousands of Jewish volumes taken by looting German forces during World War II. The pocket-size religious book, published in Amsterdam in 1680, belonged to the library of the Rabbinic College of Rome. Most of the library's books were returned by the Americans in 1946, but some are still missing.
NEWS
February 9, 1989
West Germany's highest court affirmed the convictions of two elderly doctors for taking part in the Nazis' "mercy killing" of more than 11,500 handicapped people. The ruling by the Federal Court of Justice in Karlsruhe ended one of the last major Nazi-related trials in West Germany and closed out 28 years of criminal proceedings against Dr. Aquilin Ulrich and Dr. Heinrich Bunke, both 74.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1988
It was interesting to read about the polarization in the scientific community about whether anything good can come of using data generated by the Nazis in abhorrent experiments. What was even more interesting was that even though many people are aware of the experiments performed by the Nazis at Dachau and other camps and are quick to decry the undeniable awfulness of these experiments, not so many seem to be aware that there is a parallel with certain experiments done by our government.
NEWS
July 23, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Justice Department accused a retired Connecticut machinist of serving as a guard at Nazi death camps and moved to revoke his citizenship. Walter Berezowskyj, 73, served in two SS units that participated in the Nazi campaign to annihilate Europe's Jews, the government said in a complaint filed in federal court. When he sought to immigrate to the United States after World War II, Berezowskyj told U.S. officials he had spent the war working on farms, the government said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|