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OPINION
May 26, 1991
Thank you for publishing Sabine Reichel's piece on East German neo-Nazism (Commentary, May 10). She has done a good job in cataloguing the dangers of this movement and of its ingredients: the unemployment of some 1.5 million East Germans, the West Germans' contempt of them, the absence of viable economic alternatives. But it strikes me as naive to expect these youths, growing under these circumstances, to care a hoot about human suffering or notions of compassion. If these youths in fact know anything about the Nazi years, what's to prevent them from thinking that Jew-bashing, militarism and a revived Vaterland aren't damn good ideas--especially to shock their "betters" who regard them as dirt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009 | By Betsy Sharkey FILM CRITIC >>>
We don't go to Michael Haneke films for comfort, but to gaze through a glass darkly. That vision -- tense, provocative and unnerving -- is on full display in "The White Ribbon," which could be considered a culmination of this difficult director's brilliant career. Set in an ordinary German village on the eve of World War I, the film looks at the children who would survive that war and grow into the generation that would bend to Hitler's sway. Shot in black and white, which serves as both a statement and a style, Germany's foreign language Oscar entry has rightfully been collecting critical acclaim since it took the top prize at the Cannes Film Festival in May . Here the dramatic interplay of innocence, evil and human behavior so often on Haneke's radar has been joined by themes of guilt and responsibility.
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NEWS
May 17, 1988 | Reuters
The former leader of West Germany's Jewish community embezzled more than $10 million from official funds intended for victims of Nazism, his successor said today. Heinz Galinski, head of the West German Jewish Central Council, said auditors were examining the community's books. Galinski said the missing sum was "double-digit and in the millions."
WORLD
April 20, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Admirers saw an unusually personal side of Pope Benedict XVI on Saturday when he ad-libbed a reference to his faults and sins and later spoke of the "sinister" Nazi regime that was the backdrop of his youth. Both passages uttered by the pope were remarkable in their frankness and came as the German-born theologian observed the third anniversary of his election as pontiff. On the penultimate day of his six-day pilgrimage to the U.S., Benedict presided over Mass at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1985
Reagan's attempt to reclassify German soldiers buried at Bitburg as "victims of Nazism" is a fiction that will not wash! It is even an embarrassment to the generation of postwar Germans who know better. Let us remember that Nazism was exorcised not by conscience but by military defeat and that 95% of all Germans idolized Hitler to the very end--they just never forgave him for losing the war! I know--I was there. Reagan was not. INGRID SIMMEL Auschwitz, 1943-44 Mauthausen, 1945 Culver City
OPINION
July 5, 1987
One does not have to agree with the Vatican decision to receive Austrian President Kurt Waldheim, or even with the Vatican policy of informal (though sustained and cordial) relations with the State of Israel, in order to resent the Wasserman cartoon (Editorial Pages, June 24). That cartoon repeats the baseless charge of Roman Catholic collaboration with Nazism. It is easy to criticize Pius XII for not having done enough to help Jewish and other victims of Nazi murder. But the real question is, who did more?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
The Goethe Institute's "From Babelsberg to Hollywood" series continues today with Frank Borzage's anti-Nazi "The Mortal Storm" (1940). It's far more satisfying than his "Three Comrades," in which the anti-Nazi theme was relegated to the background; here it is inextricably linked to its love story. What is so chilling about this film is its depiction of how rapidly Nazism could spread--and how quickly freedom of expression evaporated in its wake.
NEWS
November 24, 1989
Kirsch's review and the book that was reviewed have a bearing on the very disquieting question of German reunification, which is being discussed so much more intensely since the recent events in both Germanys and in the Soviet Union. Some writers quoted by Kirsch are stated to have written that the excesses of Nazism were the fault of Hitler alone and that Nazism should be termed "Hitlerism," as if Hitler and perhaps a few close and like-minded buddies went about Europe industriously wiping out millions and committing the other evils as well.
OPINION
April 5, 1987 | LAURENCE GOLDSTEIN, Laurence Goldstein is a professor of English at the University of Michigan, where he edits the Michigan Quarterly Review.
In a recent book of poems about the Holocaust, William Heyen recalls that his German parents took him to the Volksfest on Long Island every summer just after World War II. He remembers his delight at the stands of smoked eel and loaves of dark bread, and the nostalgic talk about the North Sea, the Rhine, the Black Forest. He also remembers that all those years there was one word I never heard, one name never mentioned. The name of course was Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
April 19, 1985 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, under attack from Jewish and veterans groups and members of both houses of Congress, Thursday defended his plans to visit a German military cemetery, saying the soldiers buried there were "victims of Nazism just as surely as the victims of the concentration camps." Reagan's announcement earlier this week that he will also visit a Nazi concentration camp failed to calm the storm of criticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2005 | Allen Barra, Special to The Times
ON June 22, 1938, America and Europe were more caught up in a sporting event than they had ever been before or were ever likely to be again. The heavyweight champion, Joe Louis, a black sharecropper's son from rural Alabama, was fighting a rematch with former champion Max Schmeling, the man chosen by the Nazi party to carry the banner of Aryan supremacy. The world, or at least that portion of it ready to plunge into war, held its collective breath.
NEWS
April 17, 2005 | William J. Kole, Associated Press Writer
It's a transcendent turning point, indelibly etched in mortar and minds. In a windowless room tucked in the corner of a brick schoolhouse, yellowing battle maps bristling with rusty pins bear witness to the spot where World War II ended in Europe and a continent could begin to rebuild itself out of the rubble. Sixty years ago, as flashbulbs burst, a German general nervously puffing on a cheap cigar signed a hastily typed declaration of unconditional surrender.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2005 | Jon Thurber Times Staff Writer, Times Staff Writer
Alfons Heck, whose experiences as a member of the Hitler Youth organization in Nazi Germany were the basis of two memoirs and an HBO documentary, has died. He was 76. Heck died Tuesday of heart failure at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, according to his wife, June. In his books "A Child of Hitler: Germany in the Days When God Wore a Swastika" and "The Burden of Hitler's Legacy," Heck recounted his fascination with National Socialism from the time he entered Hitler Youth in 1938.
WORLD
August 22, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Newly discovered U.S. diplomatic documents including a confidential memo written by the future Pope Pius XII indicate that whatever the pontiff's failings to publicly confront Adolph Hitler, he came to privately believe that compromise with the Nazi regime was "out of the question." A year before Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli -- the future Pius XII -- cautioned against compromise in a 1938 memo intended for President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a U.S.
WORLD
November 21, 2002 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
As presented by President Bush in Prague on Wednesday, a war against Iraq would take its place alongside the great struggles that defined civilization through much of the 20th century. In a speech to students in the Czech capital, Bush used the fight against the Nazis and the Cold War division of Europe to frame his campaign to disarm Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial exhibition at the Jewish Museum has made art critics out of an unlikely group: Holocaust survivors. After seeing only the catalog of the exhibition, which opens Sunday and features contemporary artworks that use Nazi imagery, some survivors' groups called for a boycott, claiming the show is repugnant and trivializes the Holocaust. For months now the New York press has been overrun with angry criticisms and passionate defenses of art few have seen.
NEWS
April 30, 1985 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Bitterness grew in West Germany on Monday over attacks on President Reagan's plan to visit a German military cemetery, and a Foreign Ministry official called on American clergymen to defend the trip. In addition, newspapers warned of the effect of the controversy on U.S.-West German relations, and government officials decried what they called false information about the visit.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Quarrel" (Laemmle's Sunset 5), passion and principle collide memorably. It's an excellent little film, with a deceptively simple story about two old enemies/friends who meet unexpectedly after 15 years' separation in a Montreal park on Rosh Hashanah. But its implications are large. Like the Jewish culture it tries to encapsulate in barely an hour and a half, this film balances philosophical issues with the warmer, earthier bonds of life. Mostly it succeeds.
NEWS
January 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Germany must devote as much attention to combating its growing neo-Nazi scene as it is to helping in the war on terrorism, the head of the country's Jewish community said in a speech opening Holocaust Day commemorations. Paul Spiegel renewed appeals for Germans to stand up to neo-Nazis in everyday life and expressed dismay about a surge of neo-Nazi "hate pages" on the Internet.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Former German chancellor Willy Brandt, who himself had fled his native land to fight Nazism, defined a resister as someone who "takes serious risks to act illegally in a world where right has become wrong." While it is never easy, as Shelley put it, "to defy Power, which seems omnipotent," to do so under Hitler's totalitarian regime took courage of an incredible kind.
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