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Nba Basketball Championship

SPORTS
June 18, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN
It was a big deal, this opening college basketball game of the 1982 season for Miami of Ohio. Indiana University was coming to Oxford, Ohio. Bobby Knight was bringing the Hoosiers to Miami because Knight admired Darrell Hedrick, the Miami coach. The medium-sized arena was packed. Media from all over Ohio as well as all the Indiana beat people had showed up. Details are hazy. I was a young reporter for the Cincinnati Post and here's what I remember. Miami almost beat Indiana.
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SPORTS
June 25, 1999 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New York Knicks, boorishly behaved, profoundly uncuddly but constantly displaying daunting survival skills, summoned every possible point of motivation and morsel of you-don't-believe-in-us spite Thursday as they tried to stay alive past tonight's Game 5 in Madison Square Garden. "Jeff [Van Gundy, the Knick coach] made an excellent point today," said forward Larry Johnson, the surliest Knick but also, not coincidentally, the team's emotional keystone.
SPORTS
June 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
With Tiger Woods out of contention, NBC's weekend ratings for the U.S. Open dropped dramatically while its coverage of the NBA Finals produced increased audiences. Game 5 of the NBA Finals between the Lakers and Philadelphia 76ers had an 11.2 rating and 22 share, a 12% increase over last year's 10.0 and 20 share for Game 5 between the Lakers and Indiana Pacers. For the five-game Finals, NBC averaged a 12.1 rating and 22 share, a 4% increase over the 11.
SPORTS
June 8, 2001 | J.A. ADANDE
All of those Laker flags sticking out of the Jeeps, Lexus coupes, Beemers and Benzes around town seemed to be flying at half-mast Thursday. What happened to the Lakers' invincibility? Why did they lose Game 1 of the NBA Finals in overtime? What next? Can Allen Iverson and the Philadelphia 76ers keep performing the way they did throughout most of Game 1, when they established air superiority with Iverson bombing away from outside, and battled in the trenches on defense? "Is it realistic?"
SPORTS
June 8, 2001 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the NBA playoffs, every seven-game series is like a chess match. Because strategy is often as important as talent, the team that makes the best adjustments between games usually gains the title as NBA champion. In Game 1 of the NBA Finals, the Philadelphia 76ers shocked the Lakers with an overtime victory, and now it is up to the defending league champions to make the right moves.
SPORTS
June 8, 2001 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Off the stage, out from behind the table, away from the cameras and the microphones, Kobe Bryant stood beside his new car, another Mercedes, clenched his fists and allowed the sunlight into his eyes. "You know what?" he said. "Playing in the Finals, playing in the NBA, it's all about facing difficult challenges. For us to come out and respond to the challenge, we're looking forward to it. We really are. We've done it before. This is no different than anything else we've done this year.
SPORTS
June 6, 2001 | Lonnie White
Don't expect Allen Iverson to fall for the Lakers' spin that the Philadelphia 76ers should be favored because they won so many individual honors this season. "Everyone on the outside looking in has us already counted out," Iverson said. "We are supposed to come to this series, get swept and go home for the summer, I guess." Iverson said all of the pressure is on the Lakers and not the 76ers, especially not with him. "There's no pressure in basketball, to me," he said. "Pressure is real life.
SPORTS
June 4, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allen Iverson scored on consecutive three-point shots to end the third quarter and begin the fourth quarter. He scored 11 points in an 18-2 Philadelphia run that gave the 76ers the lead for good in the second quarter. The NBA's most valuable player scored on fastbreak scoop shots, line-drive three-point attempts, twisting layups and one-footed, one-handed baseline jumpers.
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