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Nbc Television Network

BUSINESS
September 11, 1991 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remember that peculiar TV commercial a few years ago, where a soap-opera actor announced, "I'm not a doctor, but I play one on TV"--and then proceeded to trade on his TV persona to sell some over-the-counter remedy? Such Hippocratic high jinks could go by the boards at ABC if the network goes ahead with proposed revisions of its guidelines for advertisers about the content of TV commercials.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Hollywood and Wall Street have been hit again in recent days with rumors that General Electric was about to sell the NBC television network. In the latest stories, more than one buyer was featured--Paramount Communications for the network's entertainment facilities and contracts, with Turner Broadcasting buying NBC News and sports. Rumors, like gossip, are fun. As on past occasions, the GE rumors apparently have come to nothing.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an agreement that demonstrates the shifting balance of power between television networks and their affiliates, NBC on Monday agreed to carry programming developed by New World Communications Group on the six stations it owns in exchange for an ownership interest in the shows and renewal of affiliations with two New World stations.
SPORTS
September 30, 1988 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Two British athletes, sprinter Linford Christie and a judo medalist, tested positive for drugs in the first round of testing, the British Olympic Assn. said Friday. Christie, a former European champion and a silver medalist in the men's 100 meters, tested positive for pseudoephedrine, association spokeswoman Caroline Searle said. Searle described the drug as "a low-dose stimulant found in cold and hay fever preparations."
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This deal had it all. Speed. Fabulous sums of money. Atlantic crossings on a corporate jet. Clandestine meetings. Double-dealing. And an end game with a spy-like code name: the Sunset Project. At the center of it all: NBC's Dick Ebersol. Suave. Perpetually tan. A man with a fondness for Cuban cigars and a disdain for neckties. A man with a determination to get the Olympic Games for his network, no matter the opposition or obstacles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | ROBERT STRAUSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roger Muir had been a young producer in the nascent NBC television department for a year when he convinced himself that the network should have a kiddie show. The problem was, he had to convince his boss, Warren Wade, the head of programming, an old-time vaudeville man. "After several times hearing me badgering him about it, he said, 'All right, we're going to do it, but I want a show with live people and puppets,' " Muir said recently. "It was to be vaudeville for kids on TV."
BUSINESS
January 14, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did NBC reject talk show host David Letterman or did Letterman reject NBC? That may become the next big battle in the long-running television talk show wars. Sources close to the talks insisted on Wednesday that NBC, in a last-ditch move, offered Letterman the coveted "Tonight Show" slot held by Jay Leno just before Letterman accepted CBS' offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
The no-holds-barred competition for television exclusives ratcheted up another level this week as Paris Hilton's representatives told networks bidding for the first post-jail interview with the heiress that NBC was considering paying as much as $1 million for the scoop. The massive payment -- purportedly a license fee for the use of personal video and images of the 26-year-old -- succeeded in boxing out NBC's competition, according to a person familiar with the negotiations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gary Jacobs, one of the executive producers of NBC's 2-year-old comedy "Empty Nest," doesn't even try to get people to recognize his show by its name anymore. "I defend myself against that pain," he says, by automatically adding an explanatory sentence: "You know, the show that's on Saturday nights, after 'The Golden Girls'?" Only then, he recounts, does the light start to go on. The person will start to laugh. "Oh, yeah. Richard Mulligan, the guy from 'Soap.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation's three major television networks have abruptly pulled out of contract talks with Hollywood's two actors' unions, creating an impasse that could lead to a crippling shutdown of film production if talks do not resume shortly. Representatives of CBS, NBC and ABC late Wednesday walked out of the bargaining sessions between the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers and the two unions--the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.
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