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Neal Moritz

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1998 | Steve Hochman
Neal Moritz's grandfather co-founded and his father later ran American International Pictures, the teen-flick factory that was the unlikely training ground for such talents as Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese. As producer of "Urban Legend" and the upcoming "Cruel Intentions" and "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer," Moritz, 39, is cultivating new talent himself at his Original Film company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
The remake is called "Total Recall,"but many moviegoers have zero memory of the 1990 film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. And that, according to the filmmaking team behind Sony's $125 million reboot of the sci-fi action adventure, actually might be a good thing. "The majority of people under 35 don't even know about the original," said Neal Moritz, who produced the "Total Recall" update opening Friday. "It was so cheesy... the tone of it was so much different from what I wanted to do. " Set several decades in the future, the new film stars Colin Farrell, Jessica Biel and Kate Beckinsale and takes place on an Earth that has been rendered largely uninhabitable by chemical warfare.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Several years ago, Neal Moritz had a promising movie about a young undercover cop who gets mixed up with a brazen gang of thieves who street race souped-up Honda Civics at just under the speed of sound. But what the film, then known as "Redline," needed was a better title. One night the producer went with his parents to see a documentary about American International Pictures, the fabled B-movie factory that churned out such teen drive-in classics as "Beach Blanket Bingo" and "The Wild Angels."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In Hollywood, the more things change, the more they remain the same. When I was a clueless cub reporter, I did a story on Sam Arkoff, the B-movie impresario behind the fabled American International Pictures, the low-budget assembly line (known as AIP) that churned out hundreds of quickie teen exploitation beach party and horror films. In his office, Arkoff had movie posters adorned with catchy titles and ad slogans.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In Hollywood, the more things change, the more they remain the same. When I was a clueless cub reporter, I did a story on Sam Arkoff, the B-movie impresario behind the fabled American International Pictures, the low-budget assembly line (known as AIP) that churned out hundreds of quickie teen exploitation beach party and horror films. In his office, Arkoff had movie posters adorned with catchy titles and ad slogans.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
The remake is called "Total Recall,"but many moviegoers have zero memory of the 1990 film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. And that, according to the filmmaking team behind Sony's $125 million reboot of the sci-fi action adventure, actually might be a good thing. "The majority of people under 35 don't even know about the original," said Neal Moritz, who produced the "Total Recall" update opening Friday. "It was so cheesy... the tone of it was so much different from what I wanted to do. " Set several decades in the future, the new film stars Colin Farrell, Jessica Biel and Kate Beckinsale and takes place on an Earth that has been rendered largely uninhabitable by chemical warfare.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The mean streets of America's urban ghettos are suddenly teeming with filmmakers. "Boyz N the Hood," "New Jack City," "Hanging With the Home Boys" and "Straight Out of Brooklyn" have all told basically the same story of trapped teen-agers steamrollered by an unforgiving environment. "Juice" (citywide) is the latest entry in this particular sweepstakes, and though it is a vivid, promising piece of work from first-time director Ernest R.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Ben Fritz and Sergei Loiko, Los Angeles Times
On a hot summer night this week in a historic Moscow square, a delegation of Hollywood celebrities headed by director Michael Bay and actor Shia LaBeouf marched past the 33-foot tall Alexander Pushkin monument and up the green carpeted stairs to the movie theater, a drab Soviet-era cube of concrete and glass. In a poorly air-conditioned auditorium filled well beyond its 2,000-seat capacity, the Hollywood contingent went on stage to introduce the opening film of the 33rd Moscow International Film Festival: Paramount Pictures' "Transformers: Dark of the Moon," the latest in the series of critically pummeled but wildly popular extravaganzas featuring giant battling robots, fiery explosions and scantily clad young actresses.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2000
The Los Angeles Press Club and the Producers Guild of America will present a public forum, "High Noon in Hollywood: Art vs. Commerce in the Movies," on Dec. 18 at the L.A. Film School Theater, 6363 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
Gasol trade rumors: In the March 14 Sports section, an article about the Chicago Bulls' interest in trading for Pau Gasol said the Lakers star had a 15% trade kicker in his contract, so that if Gasol was traded he would make $21.9 million next season instead of a scheduled salary of $19 million. In fact, trade kickers apply only if a player is below the applicable NBA maximum salary. Gasol is already a so-called maximum-salary player, so he can't receive additional money through a trade kicker clause.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Several years ago, Neal Moritz had a promising movie about a young undercover cop who gets mixed up with a brazen gang of thieves who street race souped-up Honda Civics at just under the speed of sound. But what the film, then known as "Redline," needed was a better title. One night the producer went with his parents to see a documentary about American International Pictures, the fabled B-movie factory that churned out such teen drive-in classics as "Beach Blanket Bingo" and "The Wild Angels."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1998 | Steve Hochman
Neal Moritz's grandfather co-founded and his father later ran American International Pictures, the teen-flick factory that was the unlikely training ground for such talents as Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese. As producer of "Urban Legend" and the upcoming "Cruel Intentions" and "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer," Moritz, 39, is cultivating new talent himself at his Original Film company.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Could "Fast & Furious 7" soon be back on the road? A report says that shooting on the Universal Pictures film will resume in April after a hiatus that began in December after the death of star Paul Walker. Universal, director James Wan, writer Chris Morgan and producer Neal Moritz had been convening to work out how to continue the movie's narrative with only about half of Walker's scenes shot. A  story  in the Hollywood Reporter says shooting will begin around April 1 on the Atlanta set of the automotive action movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2001
Punchy from shopping and looking for a break from sweeping, epic films of December? The folks associated with "Not Another Teen Movie" are betting on it. The spoof, which opens Friday, the same day as such heavyweights as "Vanilla Sky" and "The Royal Tenenbaums," takes digs at the entire "teen movie genre," according to its producer, Neal Moritz, whose credits include numerous teen-type films including "I Know What You Did Last Summer" and "Cruel Intentions."
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