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November 1, 2001 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Neal Slavin first read Arthur Miller's novel "Focus" in 1962, while he was a student at New York's Cooper Union School of Art. Though Slavin went on to a long and successful career as a commercial and fine art photographer, he could never shake his obsessive desire to turn the famed playwright's first and only novel into a feature film. After rereading "Focus" more than a dozen times during a three-decade period, Slavin finally approached Miller in 1994 about turning his dream into a reality.
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November 1, 2001 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Neal Slavin first read Arthur Miller's novel "Focus" in 1962, while he was a student at New York's Cooper Union School of Art. Though Slavin went on to a long and successful career as a commercial and fine art photographer, he could never shake his obsessive desire to turn the famed playwright's first and only novel into a feature film. After rereading "Focus" more than a dozen times during a three-decade period, Slavin finally approached Miller in 1994 about turning his dream into a reality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's unfortunate that director Neal Slavin's earnest adaptation of Arthur Miller's "Focus," a 1945 novel that is the playwright's first published work, is more awkward than convincing, because its theme--discrimination that begins with nothing more than appearance--is especially timely in light of attacks on Arab Americans and Sikhs after Sept. 11. Miller wrote out of his own experience, in pre-World War II America, with anti-Semitism, a far more overt and widely condoned evil than it is today.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2001
Friday THE GLASS HOUSE Thriller , Columbia With: Leelee Sobieski, Diane Lane, Bruce Dern, Trevor Morgan, Stellan Skarsgard. The idea: Orphaned teenager and younger brother have reason to suspect the motives of their wealthy new guardians. Writer: Wesley Strick. Director: Daniel Sackheim. So? Producer Neal Moritz knows teen thrills ("I Know What You Did Last Summer").
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2001 | CHRIS PETRIKIN, Chris Petrikin is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
Scared away from theaters this summer by the plague of "mores"--more mummies, more dinosaurs, more apes, more hormonally charged teens, more dumb movies? Don't care whether Vin Diesel is a French wine, a new grade of fuel or the star of a summer hit? Have your second set of teeth? Then welcome back to the fall, a time when Hollywood shifts from formulaic summer movies to more high-minded films aimed at adults. At least that's the way it's supposed to be.
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