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BUSINESS
June 2, 1998 | Associated Press and Reuters
NEC Corp.'s NEC Electronics Inc. unit said it will build a $1.4-billion advanced semiconductor plant at its facility in Roseville, about 30 miles northeast of Sacramento. The Japanese company said the new plant will start operation in 2002 and will create 700 jobs. It would make high-performance multimedia chips, system-on-a-chip processors and 256-megabit and 1-gigabit dynamic random-access memory chips, or DRAMs.
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BUSINESS
December 5, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
NEC Electronics America Inc. and Elpida Memory Inc. agreed to pay a total of $50.7 million to resolve lawsuits claiming they conspired to fix prices of computer memory chips. The agreements settled private antitrust lawsuits filed over sales of dynamic random access memory, or DRAM, chips in the U.S. from 1999 to 2002, according to papers filed Friday in federal court in San Francisco.
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BUSINESS
August 29, 1997 | Bloomberg News
NEC Corp.'s NEC Electronics Inc. said it will invest $120 million in its California facility to support a new technology. The money will go for new equipment that will enable the plant to build products previously only manufactured at its plants in Japan. NEC makes microprocessors, 3-D graphics accelerators and components including flat-panel displays. The Roseville-based plant makes microprocessor and memory devices. The new equipment will be installed in the fourth quarter.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
NEC Corp., Japan's biggest maker of personal computers, said Thursday that two of its U.S. units received subpoenas as part of a Justice Department antitrust investigation of memory chip companies. The units, Elpida Memory and NEC Electronics America, got grand jury subpoenas from the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on June 19, 2002, and May 30, 2003, respectively, Tokyo-based NEC said in a regulatory filing. Both units are based in Santa Clara, Calif.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1987 | Associated Press
A judge who issued a landmark ruling that the internal design of microchips is protected by U.S. copyright law has removed himself from the case, apparently because he owns $80 worth of stock. The move by U.S. District Judge William A. Ingram to quit the legal battle between Intel Corp. of Santa Clara, Calif., and NEC Corp. of Japan means that the two sides will have to start the case again from the beginning. It began in 1984.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
NEC Electronics America Inc. and Elpida Memory Inc. agreed to pay a total of $50.7 million to resolve lawsuits claiming they conspired to fix prices of computer memory chips. The agreements settled private antitrust lawsuits filed over sales of dynamic random access memory, or DRAM, chips in the U.S. from 1999 to 2002, according to papers filed Friday in federal court in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
NEC Corp., Japan's biggest maker of personal computers, said Thursday that two of its U.S. units received subpoenas as part of a Justice Department antitrust investigation of memory chip companies. The units, Elpida Memory and NEC Electronics America, got grand jury subpoenas from the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on June 19, 2002, and May 30, 2003, respectively, Tokyo-based NEC said in a regulatory filing. Both units are based in Santa Clara, Calif.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
There is a Japanese supercomputer performing more than 1 billion mathematical calculations per second in Houston these days, and it represents a significant challenge to U.S. dominance of one of the highest peaks in high technology. To get the order, NEC Corp. (formerly Nippon Electric Co.), a formidably competitive manufacturer of computers, telephone equipment and semiconductors, made a very attractive lease deal to the customer, the Houston Area Research Center.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Two leading Japanese manufacturers of portable, laptop computers are actively considering transfering production of the machines to the United States to reduce trade tensions and circumvent the tariffs imposed last week on Japanese consumer goods by the Reagan Administration. Among the locations that might be used for the newly transferred manufacturing is the Irvine plant of Toshiba America.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1998 | Associated Press and Reuters
NEC Corp.'s NEC Electronics Inc. unit said it will build a $1.4-billion advanced semiconductor plant at its facility in Roseville, about 30 miles northeast of Sacramento. The Japanese company said the new plant will start operation in 2002 and will create 700 jobs. It would make high-performance multimedia chips, system-on-a-chip processors and 256-megabit and 1-gigabit dynamic random-access memory chips, or DRAMs.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1997 | Bloomberg News
NEC Corp.'s NEC Electronics Inc. said it will invest $120 million in its California facility to support a new technology. The money will go for new equipment that will enable the plant to build products previously only manufactured at its plants in Japan. NEC makes microprocessors, 3-D graphics accelerators and components including flat-panel displays. The Roseville-based plant makes microprocessor and memory devices. The new equipment will be installed in the fourth quarter.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities are investigating a second bid-rigging case at a military base in Japan on the heels of a major victory that has increased pressure to open the Japanese construction market to U.S. firms. Stuart M. Gerson, assistant attorney general in charge of the civil division, confirmed that the second inquiry involves contracts at another U.S. base in Japan, but he declined to disclose any details. "There is at least one other case," Gerson said in an interview.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of a trial that might have aired the growing resentment of some American workers toward their Japanese bosses, two Americans who ran a Silicon Valley electronics firm agreed Thursday to settle a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against their Japanese former employers. Thomas McDannold and Edward A. Neubauer had charged that NEC Electronics, a Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1987 | Associated Press
A judge who issued a landmark ruling that the internal design of microchips is protected by U.S. copyright law has removed himself from the case, apparently because he owns $80 worth of stock. The move by U.S. District Judge William A. Ingram to quit the legal battle between Intel Corp. of Santa Clara, Calif., and NEC Corp. of Japan means that the two sides will have to start the case again from the beginning. It began in 1984.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of a trial that might have aired the growing resentment of some American workers toward their Japanese bosses, two Americans who ran a Silicon Valley electronics firm agreed Thursday to settle a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against their Japanese former employers. Thomas McDannold and Edward A. Neubauer had charged that NEC Electronics, a Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities are investigating a second bid-rigging case at a military base in Japan on the heels of a major victory that has increased pressure to open the Japanese construction market to U.S. firms. Stuart M. Gerson, assistant attorney general in charge of the civil division, confirmed that the second inquiry involves contracts at another U.S. base in Japan, but he declined to disclose any details. "There is at least one other case," Gerson said in an interview.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
There is a Japanese supercomputer performing more than 1 billion mathematical calculations per second in Houston these days, and it represents a significant challenge to U.S. dominance of one of the highest peaks in high technology. To get the order, NEC Corp. (formerly Nippon Electric Co.), a formidably competitive manufacturer of computers, telephone equipment and semiconductors, made a very attractive lease deal to the customer, the Houston Area Research Center.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Two leading Japanese manufacturers of portable, laptop computers are actively considering transfering production of the machines to the United States to reduce trade tensions and circumvent the tariffs imposed last week on Japanese consumer goods by the Reagan Administration. Among the locations that might be used for the newly transferred manufacturing is the Irvine plant of Toshiba America.
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