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Ned Munger

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 40 years, Ned Munger stalked books about Africa the way safari hunters stalk big game. Often, the thrill was in the pursuit. Once, while crawling on his hands and knees along the cold concrete-floor basement of a Zurich bookshop in the early 1960s, the former Caltech professor heard what sounded like a huge rat gnawing at a book. He peered cautiously into the next aisle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 40 years, Ned Munger stalked books about Africa the way safari hunters stalk big game. Often, the thrill was in the pursuit. Once, while crawling on his hands and knees along the cold concrete-floor basement of a Zurich bookshop in the early 1960s, the former Caltech professor heard what sounded like a huge rat gnawing at a book. He peered cautiously into the next aisle.
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BOOKS
June 4, 1989
Marvin Seid's excellent review of "Retreat From Doomsday: The Obsolescence of Major War" (Book Review, April 23) brings to mind the comments by a group of scientists from Eastern and Western Europe, in Warsaw a few years ago. At the Pugwash dinner I posed the question: What is the most important reason of no war in Europe for more than 40 years? A Dutchman said it first, then a Hungarian, Pole, Italian, Frenchman, East German and so on. The key explanation was, "We have forgotten history."
BOOKS
December 23, 1990
Jon Carroll's review of Christian Vaisse's "Living in Mauritius" (Nov. 25) has a curious error. Former (not now) President (Leopold) Senghor of Senegal is described as President of Mauritius. Actually, he has never even visited Mauritius, where there are very few black Africans. The island, once the home of the extinct dodo bird, is overwhelmingly Indian with a Hindu majority, along with a minority of white people of French extraction. To its credit, Mauritius is the only member of the Organization of African Unity which has twice voted a government out of office and then let the new opposition come to power.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1988
As readers, we have a propensity to hurl brickbats more often than encomiums. One suspects that Howard Rosenberg will receive plenty of the former, from at least two directions, for his review of "Terrorist on Trial: The United States vs. Salim Ajami," the CBS television drama on terrorism in the Middle East ("Arab Image in Fact and Fiction," Jan. 8). His review impressed this reader with its obvious attempt to be fair-minded and evenhanded. Furthermore, he succeeded admirably.
NEWS
October 9, 1986
(On Sept. 4) you ran a story by Mary Barber on the Cape of Good Hope Foundation, which is dedicated to helping a predominantly black but racially integrated and autonomous university near Cape Town, The University of the Western Cape. The article was subsequently picked up and run the following Sunday in the Westside section. The telling of our story was so persuasive that the foundation has received offers of $7,000 in books for the library at the black university, as well as offers of volunteer assistance in the operation of the foundation.
NEWS
October 2, 1986
On Sept. 4 you ran a story by Mary Barber on the Cape of Good Hope Foundation, which is dedicated to helping a predominantly black but racially integrated and autonomous university near Cape Town, the University of the Western Cape. The article was subsequently picked up and run the following Sunday in the Westside section. The telling of our story was so persuasive that the foundation has received offers of $7,000 in books for the library at the black university, as well as offers of volunteer assistance in the operation of the foundation.
NEWS
April 20, 1990
Scott Kraft's excellent article on Andre Brink on April 17 has one significant misstatement. He says that Brink, as an Afrikaner, is a rarity in anti-apartheid literature. Fortunately, Brink has many peers in his Afrikaans community. A generation ago, when Afrikaans authors began to seriously attack the shibboleths of their society, the novelists earned the collective title Die Sestigers , or Men of the Sixties. One could name a dozen writers, including Prof. J. M. Coetzee of Pochefstroom University who won the coveted Booker Prize in England.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1999
The death of Dr. Julius Kambarage Nyerere, the first president of Tanzania, is a great loss to Africa at a time when negative images of the continent's leaders are so often featured in the news (Oct. 15). In 1957, a year before he became a member of the legislature, he visited me in Chicago and we did a radio program for NBC. Afterward, I said we would take the Illinois Central train to my apartment at the University of Chicago. Nyerere said, "In Africa I walk a lot and I can think.
NEWS
November 27, 2001 | NED MUNGER
Mt. Kilimanjaro is located on the equator. When Europeans first saw the mountain in 1848, they reported snow at the top. They were not believed. How could there be snow in such a hot place as the equator? Geographers said the white stuff must be salt deposited by the dormant volcano. They didn't know that the higher the altitude, the colder the air, even at the equator! As Julie, Carl, and Uncle Bill walked around Moshi in the morning, the air was crisp.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Anyone who saw the Tony Awards ceremonies a couple of weeks ago couldn't help but sense serious hand-wringing about the state of Broadway's health. Those ills are now driving artists even farther afield. Donald Driver's "In the Sweet Bye and Bye" is a case in point. At 62, he has been a New York director for 20 years.
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