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Needle Exchange Program

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1994
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to have health officials study the feasibility of a countywide needle exchange program to help slow the spread of the AIDS virus. The vote does not authorize any county agency to begin a needle exchange program or sanction exchange programs by private community agencies. But Supervisor Ed Edelman said: "We need an objective study (as to) whether a needle exchange program will help stop the spread of this disease."
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OPINION
April 10, 2012 | By Shoshanna Scholar
The first cases of HIV identified anywhere in the world are widely thought to have been in Los Angeles in 1981. Since then, 45,000 Angelenos have contracted HIV and nearly half have died due to the disease. As terrible as that statistic is, we can look back over the last 30 years with considerable pride because Los Angeles' courageous response to the epidemic also saved many lives. We now know how much worse things would have been had local elected leaders not braved controversy to support one of the most effective HIV prevention tools we have: needle exchange.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1994
The Department of Health Services, in a report to be presented to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors next week, is recommending the implementation of a countywide needle exchange program to help stem the spread of the AIDS virus. The report concludes that needle exchange is an appropriate public health measure that could help to prevent or control disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved a $500,000 certified needle exchange program, though two supervisors -- Mike Antonovich and Don Knabe -- questioned its benefits and suggested the money would be better spent on education and rehabilitation. The program, financed with tobacco settlement funds, provides controlled access to clean needles to drug users and others. The purpose is to prevent HIV and other blood-borne diseases by offering a safe alternative to dirty needles.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An experiment in providing free needles to drug addicts not only reduced unsafe practices that transmit the AIDS virus but resulted in more addicts seeking drug treatment, a health official involved in the nation's first needle-exchange program said Tuesday.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | Associated Press
Handing out clean needles to drug users appears to cut their risk of AIDS in half, a new study concludes. More than 40 U.S. cities have needle exchange programs, but evidence that they actually reduce the risk of AIDS infection has been slim. Most of the data has come from studies in Europe, where AIDS among drug addicts is generally far less common than in the United States, especially the Northeast.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | Iris Yokoi, Times community correspondent
Vera Owens, chief operations officer, Minority AIDS Project "It's illegal to have a needle-exchange program, but we think it would save more lives if they did have one. It is not promoting the use of drugs; it is saving lives. Drug users have interactions with people who don't use drugs too. You might have a woman involved with a man and she doesn't even know he's a drug user and that he's HIV-positive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of opposition, this politically conservative city appears on the verge of joining the growing list of communities that provide needle exchanges for drug addicts in an effort to prevent the spread of diseases such as AIDS and hepatitis through dirty needles. The county Board of Supervisors remains steadfastly against such a program and has forbidden the Department of Health and Human Services from involvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AIDS activists offered up 1,100 used hypodermic needles on the steps of the Department of Health Services building Tuesday to call for support of a needle exchange program and to protest what they say is the county's slow response to the AIDS crisis. Almost as a measure of their dedication, ACT UP activists bragged before the noon protest that they intended to get arrested for possessing the syringes, a misdemeanor without a prescription in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2002 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health-care volunteers soon will begin exchanging new needles for used ones brought in by drug users in Santa Paula, as the Ventura County Health Care Agency expands its year-old syringe replacement program. The move into Santa Paula is part of an effort to take the program countywide, where an estimated 905 to 1,460 residents are thought to be infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2005 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Department officials took steps this week to ease concerns that police had been trying to intimidate clients of a needle exchange program in Hollywood. "We recognize that we need to continue to evolve, and we're certainly sensitive to this problem," Assistant Chief George Gascon told the Police Commission on Tuesday. "It's a matter of us finding a way trying to strike a balance between public health and reducing crime."
OPINION
May 18, 2003
Re "Riverside County Says No to Needle Program," May 14: One should always be wary of law enforcement officials who make pronouncements on public health strategy, but especially when their uncompromising positions reflect beliefs that have no basis in fact. The Riverside County Board of Supervisors is making a big mistake in accepting the notion that needle exchange programs promote the use of illegal drugs. They don't, as consistent experience throughout the world, including the United States, proves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2003 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Noting a surge in hepatitis C, Public Health Officer Gary Feldman is urging the Riverside County Board of Supervisors to give drug addicts access to clean needles. The proposal pits the county's top health officials against the sheriff and district attorney. Today, both sides will meet when the Board of Supervisors debates whether to allow a needle exchange program and whether to support proposed state legislation letting pharmacies sell syringes without a prescription.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2002 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health-care volunteers soon will begin exchanging new needles for used ones brought in by drug users in Santa Paula, as the Ventura County Health Care Agency expands its year-old syringe replacement program. The move into Santa Paula is part of an effort to take the program countywide, where an estimated 905 to 1,460 residents are thought to be infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2002 | NERISSA PACIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill to be considered by the Assembly Health Committee today would allow adults 18 and older to buy up to 30 hypodermic needles or syringes at licensed pharmacies without a doctor's prescription. "The purpose of the bill is to save lives in California," said Sue North, chief of staff for its author, state Sen. John Vasconcellos (D-Santa Clara). The bill has passed in the Senate, although Gov. Gray Davis has not taken a position on it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 5-4 vote, the San Diego City Council on Tuesday declared a health emergency and authorized a yearlong trial program to provide clean needles to drug addicts to prevent the spread of AIDS, hepatitis and other diseases. The state's second-largest city has been one of the few large cities in the nation without an officially sanctioned needle exchange program. "It's time for San Diego to catch up," said Councilman Ralph Inzunza, who voted for the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2000 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County's Public Health Department is recommending that the county begin a needle exchange program to stem hepatitis and HIV infection rates. Public Health Officer Robert Levin will ask the Board of Supervisors to declare a county emergency, which would pave the way for a program like those authorized by supervisors in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara counties.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the things that set this region apart from most urban areas, add this: San Diego County has no official needle-exchange program for drug addicts. The American Medical Assn., the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say such efforts can reduce the spread of disease without increasing drug usage, but San Diego's conservative political leadership has been steadfast in its opposition. A bill signed by Gov.
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