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Neem Tree

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Its leaves can make painkilling drugs and skin ointments. Its twigs are decay-preventing toothbrushes. And its seeds can be used to make environment-friendly insecticides. An extract may work as a contraceptive and oil from its seeds has antifungal and antiseptic properties and can be used in soaps and cosmetics. All this from a tree called neem, which some researchers call a wonder plant.
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HEALTH
August 30, 2004 | Elena Conis
The termite-resistant neem tree, a member of the mahogany family, is native to India, where it's been used for centuries as a dye, medicine and insecticide for crops. In the U.S., oil from neem seeds is used as an ingredient in herbal moisturizers, soaps, shampoos and toothpastes. Researchers recently began studying whether the hardy, fast-growing tree -- now grown in tropical regions around the world -- may have a role to play in reducing erosion, deforestation and global warming.
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NEWS
April 26, 1992 | ED SCHAFER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In its native India, the neem tree has long been believed to have miraculous powers. And scientists around the world are beginning to agree. For at least 2,000 years, Indians have cleaned their teeth with its twigs, smeared neem-leaf juice on skin blemishes, drunk neem tea as a tonic, and placed neem leaves in their beds, books, grain bins, cupboards and closets to keep out troublesome bugs.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | ED SCHAFER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In its native India, the neem tree has long been believed to have miraculous powers. And scientists around the world are beginning to agree. For at least 2,000 years, Indians have cleaned their teeth with its twigs, smeared neem-leaf juice on skin blemishes, drunk neem tea as a tonic, and placed neem leaves in their beds, books, grain bins, cupboards and closets to keep out troublesome bugs.
HEALTH
August 30, 2004 | Elena Conis
The termite-resistant neem tree, a member of the mahogany family, is native to India, where it's been used for centuries as a dye, medicine and insecticide for crops. In the U.S., oil from neem seeds is used as an ingredient in herbal moisturizers, soaps, shampoos and toothpastes. Researchers recently began studying whether the hardy, fast-growing tree -- now grown in tropical regions around the world -- may have a role to play in reducing erosion, deforestation and global warming.
BOOKS
August 18, 1991 | Chris Goodrich
UNDER THE NEEM TREE by Susan Lowerre (Permanent Press: $21.95; 255 pp.). It sounds close to hellish--spending two years in a tiny Senegalese village at the edge of the desertified African Sahel, trying to manage a fish farm in which the native population takes little interest. Susan Lowerre was 23 when she joined the Peace Corps in the mid-1980s, and it's a good bet that only youthful idealism saw her through.
HOME & GARDEN
January 20, 2001 | From ASSOCIATED PRESS
The natural approach pays the biggest dividends in insect and blight control, and there are two primary options--natural substances and disease-causing microorganisms. Here are some of the products with the best records of success. These products are offered by a variety of firms, the Ringer Corp., (9959 Valley View Road, Eden Prairie, MN 55364) being the most prominent. A word of caution, however. Insecticides of any kind should be used sparingly and only as a last resort.
HOME & GARDEN
November 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
When it comes to weed control, a healthy, well-aerated, dethatched and nutrient-rich turf will choke out all but the most stubborn invaders. The rest can often be managed by hand weeding and mowing. Pest management is really a matter of numbers. A few pests won't make that big a difference and may even signal a healthy lawn. When your lawn is naturally disease- and insect-resistant, and is kept healthy using the methods discussed above, the degree of damage is often acceptable.
HOME & GARDEN
February 13, 1999 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
When it comes to weed control, a healthy, well-aerated, dethatched and nutrient-rich turf will choke out all but the most stubborn invaders. The rest often can be managed by hand weeding and mowing. Pest management is really a matter of numbers. A few pests won't make that big a difference and may even signal a healthy lawn. When your lawn is naturally disease- and insect-resistant, and is kept healthy using the methods discussed above, the degree of damage is often acceptable.
HOME & GARDEN
August 21, 1993 | From Associated Press
What sweet revenge it is on insect pests that well over a thousand plants have insecticidal properties. So-called "botanical insecticides," made from ground-up roots, stems, flowers or leaves of such plants, have a long history. Ancient Greeks and Romans used pulverized roots of white hellebore ( Veratrum album ) to kill insects. Sabadilla, extracted from the seeds of a South American shrub, was used in the 16th Century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Its leaves can make painkilling drugs and skin ointments. Its twigs are decay-preventing toothbrushes. And its seeds can be used to make environment-friendly insecticides. An extract may work as a contraceptive and oil from its seeds has antifungal and antiseptic properties and can be used in soaps and cosmetics. All this from a tree called neem, which some researchers call a wonder plant.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | ASHOK SHARMA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For centuries, India's peasant farmers have used the bark, oil and gum of the neem tree to make pesticides to protect their crops. Today, the tree regarded by many Hindus as sacred is the focus of an international dispute over who should control--and profit from--the planet's biological resources. Developed countries have long relied on resources like the neem to develop medicines and insecticides.
BOOKS
December 26, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
"Gloom," "puritan disgust," paranoia: These are some of the emotions novelist-journalist-traveller Colin Thubron experiences in his journey through Siberia, an area that covers a staggering one-twelfth of the Earth. These are the happy vibes. Mostly, what Thubron feels is fear. The Trans-Siberian railroad, built in 1891, goes no faster than 50 decrepit miles an hour, and this alone is frightening.
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