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Neema Barnette

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
With the fiery "Civil Brand," director Neema Barnette, in her theatrical feature debut, resurrects that old exploitation genre favorite, the women's prison picture, as an expose of that contemporary phenomenon, the prison-industrial complex. Barnette's decision to bring aboard Joyce Renee Lewis to work on Preston A. Whitmore II's original script has paid off in a compelling, highly charged film that brings a contemporary perspective to classic prison picture elements.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
With the fiery "Civil Brand," director Neema Barnette, in her theatrical feature debut, resurrects that old exploitation genre favorite, the women's prison picture, as an expose of that contemporary phenomenon, the prison-industrial complex. Barnette's decision to bring aboard Joyce Renee Lewis to work on Preston A. Whitmore II's original script has paid off in a compelling, highly charged film that brings a contemporary perspective to classic prison picture elements.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer
In the world of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust"--set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s--earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent. In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City lot--hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Andre Chautard, Special to The Times
Tears well in the eyes of director Neema Barnette as she pours out the story of the three years it's taken to bring her first feature film, the urban women's prison tale "Civil Brand," to theaters. "A lot of things happened during this project, but I was determined to see it through," she says. Shortly before passing away, Barnette's dying mother encouraged her to do the film. During the difficult shoot, members of the cast and crew came down with pneumonia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Andre Chautard, Special to The Times
Tears well in the eyes of director Neema Barnette as she pours out the story of the three years it's taken to bring her first feature film, the urban women's prison tale "Civil Brand," to theaters. "A lot of things happened during this project, but I was determined to see it through," she says. Shortly before passing away, Barnette's dying mother encouraged her to do the film. During the difficult shoot, members of the cast and crew came down with pneumonia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Two teens, drawn together after witnessing a murder, find their growing attraction affected by another tragedy: societal prejudices. "Different Worlds: A Story of Interracial Love" is today's "CBS Schoolbreak Special" (3 p.m., Channels 2 and 8), a sensitive look at the multitude of barriers that prevent human connections between racial and ethnic groups. Christine (Noelle Parker) and Jordan (Duanne Martin) live in worlds that barely touch: She's white, he's black.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1996 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
A gifted female track star overcoming a near-tragic illness to win Olympic gold is a compelling true-life story. Sunday's TV dramatization, "Run for the Dream: The Gail Devers Story," lacks the depth to be as compelling, but Charlayne Woodard in the title role and Louis Gossett Jr. as her tough coach are a class act.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1990 | RAY LOYND
Ruby Dee has fashioned a rich salute to an obscure American folklorist whose voice is as authentic as Mississippi mud. "Zora Is My Name!" on "American Playhouse" tonight (at 9 on Channel 28, 9:30 on Channel 15) infers that the little-known Zora Neale Hurston was a 20th-Century Joel Chandler Harris who recorded adult folk tales told by those "who lived on the other side of the crik."
NEWS
February 6, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
A sampling of the dozens of offerings in the 11th annual Pan African Film & Arts Festival, opening tonight, suggests that this may well be the strongest to date. Issues of cultural identity and displacement, a legacy of colonialism, emerge as key themes, and social and political concerns tend to emerge implicitly, rather than didactically, within stylish, personal films. Many of the festival's widely diverse films deserve much wider exposure.
MAGAZINE
February 28, 1988
TIM REID and Hugh Wilson concocted "Frank's Place," one of this season's biggest hits, following an afternoon of tennis at Wilson's house. They took their idea to CBS, and today they are the program's co-executive producers. What makes their story unusual is that they succeeded despite avoiding the social circuit where deals are often made in Hollywood. And Reid is black, Wilson white.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer
In the world of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust"--set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s--earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent. In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City lot--hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1995 | JAMAA FANAKA, Jamaa Fanaka is an award-winning independent writer-producer-director who lives in Inglewood. and
Though I am a determined fan of Times movie critic Kenneth Turan, I was severely disappointed by his review " 'Higher Learning' at Singleton U" (Calendar, Jan. 11). I had the pleasure of attending the premiere of John Singleton's third feature and I must say right off that I have seldom been prouder to be an African American. Make no mistake about it, Singleton is a formidable talent who has a firm grasp on the craft as well as the art of making movies.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gloria Steinem has never played it safe. And the renowned feminist and founder of Ms. Magazine certainly doesn't disappoint with "Better Off Dead," a new Lifetime movie on which she was executive producer. "Better Off Dead," which stars Mare Winningham and Tyra Ferrell ("Boyz N the Hood," "White Men Can't Jump"), tackles such volatile subjects as abortion, the death penalty and race relations.
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