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Neenach Ca

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991
Neenach isn't much these days. But it never was. Except for a small school that was closed in 1948, Neenach has mainly been a patchwork of farms. For the most part it's just been a name on the map, as is Pine Store, a former town a couple of miles to the south. The only large building is a Spanish-style edifice with a tower, located a few miles west, that once served as a switching station for a telephone company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2008 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Sigfried Carrle angled his farmer's hat into a forceful wind roaring across the Antelope Valley. He did not blink, even when a fly bounced off his craggy cheek. Dust curdled the air and shrouded the sun, and stalks of wheat trembled like the strings of a harp. The sign at Carrle's farm stand on the gravel shoulder of California 138, in the town of Neenach, read: "Last Chance Peaches. " The landscape was so bleak it seemed prudent to ask: Before what? But the produce was fresh and plump and grown in Carrle's backyard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ever visit Sandberg, Neenach, Quail Lake or Three Points, chances are you will arrive there by mistake. That's how most people find them. Scattered like seeds across the northwestern fringe of Los Angeles County, these drowsy, remote communities-- towns is too generous a word--are mostly unknown and unsung repositories of the county's pioneer past. But anonymity is just what many of the region's residents want, and most say they moved there to escape the creep of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ever visit Sandberg, Neenach, Quail Lake or Three Points, chances are you will arrive there by mistake. That's how most people find them. Scattered like seeds across the northwestern fringe of Los Angeles County, these drowsy, remote communities-- towns is too generous a word--are mostly unknown and unsung repositories of the county's pioneer past. But anonymity is just what many of the region's residents want, and most say they moved there to escape the creep of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2008 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Sigfried Carrle angled his farmer's hat into a forceful wind roaring across the Antelope Valley. He did not blink, even when a fly bounced off his craggy cheek. Dust curdled the air and shrouded the sun, and stalks of wheat trembled like the strings of a harp. The sign at Carrle's farm stand on the gravel shoulder of California 138, in the town of Neenach, read: "Last Chance Peaches. " The landscape was so bleak it seemed prudent to ask: Before what? But the produce was fresh and plump and grown in Carrle's backyard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991
Neenach isn't much these days. But it never was. Except for a small school that was closed in 1948, Neenach has mainly been a patchwork of farms. For the most part it's just been a name on the map, as is Pine Store, a former town a couple of miles to the south. The only large building is a Spanish-style edifice with a tower, located a few miles west, that once served as a switching station for a telephone company.
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