Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNeighborhoods
IN THE NEWS

Neighborhoods

NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Ben Welsh and Thomas Suh Lauder, Los Angeles Times
Crime reports are up significantly for the latest week in 11 L.A. neighborhoods, according to an analysis of LAPD data by the Los Angeles Times' Crime L.A. database . Nine neighborhoods reported a significant increase in violent crime. Westwood (A) was the most unusual, recording three incidents compared with a weekly average of 0.6 over the last three months. Beverlywood (J) topped the list of two neighborhoods with property crime alerts. It recorded five property crimes compared with its weekly average of 1.4 over the last three months.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert, Los Angeles Times
People with Chinese or Vietnamese roots are as segregated as Latinos in neighborhoods nationwide, a study from Brown University has found. In Los Angeles and Orange counties, the pattern is even more extreme - and has grown more so over the last two decades. But the same study suggests that that may not necessarily be a problem. In many cities, some Asian Americans live in neighborhoods that appear "separate but equal," with incomes and education levels as high or higher than largely white neighborhoods, researchers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2010 | By Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Serious gang-related crime has tumbled 40% over the last three years in the troubled neighborhoods surrounding the sites of Summer Night Lights, Los Angeles' park program designed to curb violence, newly assembled police data show. This was the third summer that City Hall has run Summer Night Lights, offering recreational activities, mentoring and counseling programs, meals and other services at parks and public housing complexes. Launched in the summer of 2008, Summer Night Lights expanded to 24 sites this year.
HEALTH
October 20, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
People who move from a poor neighborhood to a better-off one could end up thinner and healthier than those who stay behind, according to an urban housing experiment that tracked low-income residents in five major cities for 10 to 15 years. The research, set up by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, shows that health is closely linked to the environments people live in — and that social policies to change those environments or move people away from blighted areas could be a key tactic in fighting the "diabesity" epidemic.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|