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Neil Woodman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neil Woodman, one of two brothers accused of hiring hit men to gun down their parents in a Brentwood garage on Yom Kippur in 1985, was convicted Monday of conspiracy and murder. In a verdict that wrote the conclusion to the so-called "Ninja murders," a Superior Court jury found Woodman, 52, guilty of two counts of murder and a sole count of conspiracy. The verdict ends one of the most enduring crime dramas in Los Angeles history, one of the earliest cases to spawn a made-for-TV movie and book.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neil Woodman, one of two brothers accused of hiring hit men to gun down their parents in a Brentwood garage on Yom Kippur in 1985, was convicted Monday of conspiracy and murder. In a verdict that wrote the conclusion to the so-called "Ninja murders," a Superior Court jury found Woodman, 52, guilty of two counts of murder and a sole count of conspiracy. The verdict ends one of the most enduring crime dramas in Los Angeles history, one of the earliest cases to spawn a made-for-TV movie and book.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two brothers were convicted Monday in the execution-style slaying of a Brentwood couple, but the jury deadlocked on murder charges against the couple's son, who was accused of hiring the hit men. The jury also found Steven Homick guilty of conspiracy to commit the murders and of the special circumstances of carrying out the crime for financial gain and lying in wait for the victims. The jury deadlocked on the conspiracy charge and on the special circumstances charges for Robert Homick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1995 | PATT MORRISON
So you think it's all wrapped up and done with, that big Brentwood double murder case. Not so. The original Brentwood double homicide, its victims 10 years dead, the public's memory of it gone for almost as long, is playing its coda in a downtown courtroom. O.J. Simpson was still hurtling through airports, and the Menendez brothers weren't old enough to drive when this crime was the Brentwood killings, the "orphan" murders, sons killing parents for hate and profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
The older of two brothers accused in the 1985 murder-for-hire of their parents may have acted alone in commissioning the killings, the younger brother's attorney suggested to a Los Angeles Superior Court jury Wednesday. "Love for his own brother" may have led Neil Woodman to hire professional assassins to shoot his parents as they returned to their Brentwood home after a post-Yom Kippur family gathering, Stewart Woodman's attorney, Jay Jaffe, said in his opening statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man convicted in the 1985 murder of his parents testified Wednesday that he had tried to set up his older brother six years ago to take the blame for the slayings. Under cross-examination in the murder trial of his brother and two alleged hit men, Stewart Woodman, 42, testified that he had extracted from his brother Neil, 48, a series of notes designed to incriminate him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1986 | TERRY PRISTIN and PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writers
Two brothers were ordered Wednesday to stand trial for arranging the murder of their parents after a judge concluded that they had close ties to two of the men accused of actually carrying out the killings, as well as "long-standing and bitter animosity" toward the victims. "Why would people with no independent motive become involved in the execution-style murder of Gerald and Vera Woodman?" Los Angeles Municipal Judge Sandy R. Kriegler said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1995 | PATT MORRISON
So you think it's all wrapped up and done with, that big Brentwood double murder case. Not so. The original Brentwood double homicide, its victims 10 years dead, the public's memory of it gone for almost as long, is playing its coda in a downtown courtroom. O.J. Simpson was still hurtling through airports, and the Menendez brothers weren't old enough to drive when this crime was the Brentwood killings, the "orphan" murders, sons killing parents for hate and profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1989
The star prosecution witness in the case of two brothers charged with masterminding the murders of their elderly parents refused to testify Monday. Michael Dominguez, 30, of Las Vegas, who pleaded guilty in 1986 to two counts of first-degree murder in the case, had agreed to testify against the other defendants. Although Dominguez testified at two preliminary hearings, when called Monday to testify at the trial of one of the brothers, Stewart Woodman, he repeatedly refused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1988 | TERRY PRISTIN
It was known as the Ninja murders. After Gerald and Vera Woodman were killed gangland-style in an underground Brentwood garage in 1985, a witness reported that at least one gunman was dressed in the martial-arts garb worn by Japanese warriors. Later, however, the case took an even more sensational turn. Two of the victims' sons were charged with hiring hit men to have their parents killed so that they could collect on a $500,000 insurance policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two brothers were convicted Monday in the execution-style slaying of a Brentwood couple, but the jury deadlocked on murder charges against the couple's son, who was accused of hiring the hit men. The jury also found Steven Homick guilty of conspiracy to commit the murders and of the special circumstances of carrying out the crime for financial gain and lying in wait for the victims. The jury deadlocked on the conspiracy charge and on the special circumstances charges for Robert Homick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man convicted in the 1985 murder of his parents testified Wednesday that he had tried to set up his older brother six years ago to take the blame for the slayings. Under cross-examination in the murder trial of his brother and two alleged hit men, Stewart Woodman, 42, testified that he had extracted from his brother Neil, 48, a series of notes designed to incriminate him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to save himself from the gas chamber, a man testified Tuesday that he and his older brother hired two men to execute their parents in 1985. Prosecutors in the case have agreed to grant Stewart Woodman, 42, life in prison without the possibility of parole if they are satisfied with his testimony against his brother, Neil, 48, and against Steven and Robert Homick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a "cleansing of the soul" that will also save his life, Stewart Woodman, convicted earlier this month of the 1985 so-called "Ninja murders" of his parents, has admitted planning the crime and will testify against his brother and two alleged hit men. As the penalty phase of his trial was about to begin Wednesday, Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1989
The star prosecution witness in the case of two brothers charged with masterminding the murders of their elderly parents refused to testify Monday. Michael Dominguez, 30, of Las Vegas, who pleaded guilty in 1986 to two counts of first-degree murder in the case, had agreed to testify against the other defendants. Although Dominguez testified at two preliminary hearings, when called Monday to testify at the trial of one of the brothers, Stewart Woodman, he repeatedly refused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
The older of two brothers accused in the 1985 murder-for-hire of their parents may have acted alone in commissioning the killings, the younger brother's attorney suggested to a Los Angeles Superior Court jury Wednesday. "Love for his own brother" may have led Neil Woodman to hire professional assassins to shoot his parents as they returned to their Brentwood home after a post-Yom Kippur family gathering, Stewart Woodman's attorney, Jay Jaffe, said in his opening statement.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
Neil and Stewart Woodman, Los Angeles brothers awaiting trial for the alleged 1985 contract murder of their parents, have been indicted in connection with the same murders by a federal grand jury in Las Vegas. The 11-count indictment, issued Thursday but made public Friday, charges the Woodmans with traveling between Nevada and California to aid in the alleged murders for hire. Stewart Woodman, 39, is also charged with participating in a racketeering enterprise led by Steven M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
The attorney questioning Vera Woodman in a civil court proceeding wanted to know about her final conversation with her eldest son. "Do you recall saying to Neil Woodman that if it was the last thing you did, you would see him and his family thrown out on the street and living in a $90 apartment?" "That's a terrible lie," the dainty, soft-spoken witness protested. "Isn't it in fact true that is what you told Neil Woodman?" the attorney persisted. Prophetic Testimony "No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
"Hate and greed" propelled two brothers to plot the 1985 murder of their parents as they returned to their Brentwood home from a post-Yom Kippur meal, a prosecutor told a Los Angeles Superior Court Tuesday. As Stewart Woodman's murder and conspiracy trial began, Deputy Dist. Atty. Patrick R. Dixon said the defendant and his brother, Neil, hired professional assassins to "kill their mother for insurance money and their father just out of pure hatred."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
The attorney questioning Vera Woodman in a civil court proceeding wanted to know about her final conversation with her eldest son. "Do you recall saying to Neil Woodman that if it was the last thing you did, you would see him and his family thrown out on the street and living in a $90 apartment?" "That's a terrible lie," the dainty, soft-spoken witness protested. "Isn't it in fact true that is what you told Neil Woodman?" the attorney persisted. Prophetic Testimony "No.
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