Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNelson Mandela
IN THE NEWS

Nelson Mandela

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Nelson Mandela was, quite famously, a fan of European classical music. His two favorite composers were George Frideric Handel and Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, but he grew up exposed to the country's rich tradition of vocal groups forging a unique form of sacred rhythm music. That changed while the former South African president and longtime democratic activist was imprisoned by the pro-apartheid government from 1962 to 1990. He wasn't allowed access to music. Artists, however, used Mandela's jailing to fuel global protest songs, and during his years in captivity, Mandela's messages were delivered on the wings of rhythm and melody.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Mark Gevisser
In South Africa today, as the country celebrates the 20th anniversary of its democracy and prepares for elections, two deeply flawed folk heroes - one venal, the other violent - have commandeered the headlines. The president, Jacob Zuma, was recently found by the Public Protector, an independent constitutional body, to have misappropriated $20 million to upgrade his private home. And Oscar Pistorius, a double amputee who awed the world with his speed running on prosthetic legs, is being tried for murder in the killing of his girlfriend.
Advertisement
WORLD
June 11, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Nelson Mandela passed his fourth day under intensive care Tuesday in a Pretoria hospital in serious but stable condition, according to a statement Tuesday by the South African presidency. The statement offered little new information, dampening hopes for a recovery by the former president, as South Africans increasingly seemed to accept their beloved hero's mortality. The statement said President Jacob Zuma met with Mandela's medical team Monday evening and received a thorough briefing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Rubin "Hurricane" Carter was at his best as a boxer, it would have been impossible to foresee Nelson Mandela or Bob Dylan doing him any favors. With his fearsome, drop-dead glare, precisely cut goatee and glistening, shaved head, Carter was violent and swaggering, a white racist's caricature of a dangerous black man. Talking to sportswriter Milton Gross for a 1964 story in the Saturday Evening Post, Carter made a widely publicized joking remark about killing cops in Harlem.
WORLD
December 7, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis
In his lifetime, Nelson Mandela achieved almost mystical stature as the liberation hero turned national reconciler who helped transform South Africa from repressive white rule to a vibrant all-race democracy. But as Los Angeles Times correspondent Robyn Dixon writes, Mandela was never comfortable wearing the mantle of a saint . He could be irritable, stubborn, aloof and was known to flirt with any pretty young woman he met. The renowned peacemaker also embraced armed struggle to end the racist system of apartheid, persuading the leaders of the African National Congress to abandon their longstanding policy of nonviolence and form a secret military wing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Susan King
The Weinstein Co. and producer Anant Singh ("The First Grader") announced Friday that the company has acquired the North American, Australian and New Zealand distribution rights to "Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom," based on the legendary South African President Nelson Mandela's 1996 autobiography. Singh  began communication with Mandela about making a film about his life while the anti-apartheid activist was still serving a life sentence in prison on charges of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government.
WORLD
July 9, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Nelson Mandela remains in a critical condition in a hospital in Pretoria, but one of his grandsons said Tuesday that the former president of South Africa was responsive and "very much alive. " Ndaba Mandela urged people to celebrate his grandfather's life as the elder statesman approaches his 95th birthday on July 18. "It's time to celebrate his life," he said. "The old man is very much alive. " He said his grandfather was aware when friends and family were there.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Twenty-three years ago, for barely 24 hours, Nelson Mandela visited Los Angeles. It was 1990, and he had been a free man for only a handful of months, but he had been a symbol for years -- of endurance, of the black-and-white apartheid battle in South Africa. He was not yet a Nobel Peace Prize co-winner, not yet the president of the new post-apartheid South Africa. But in his 10 days in the United States, he was welcomed at the White House by President George H.W. Bush. Vice President Dan Quayle called him “a symbol of freedom.” A joint session of Congress gave him 15 standing ovations in a 33-minute speech.
WORLD
June 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - President Obama, asked how Nelson Mandela's illness might alter a much-anticipated visit to South Africa, paused for a long moment, bit his lip and spoke slowly. "We'll see what the situation is when we land," the president told reporters aboard Air Force One as he flew Friday from Senegal to South Africa on the third day of his Africa tour. The deliberation in Obama's comments reflected the White House's cautious approach to the diplomatic predicament: How to be a good guest when your host is preparing for loss and distracted by sadness.
WORLD
June 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A family dispute over the burial site for Nelson Mandela's three deceased children deepened Sunday, as the former South African president remained in critical condition in a Pretoria hospital with a recurring lung infection. Mandela's controversial grandson, Mandla, chief of the Mvezo area in the Eastern Cape Province, announced that he planned to fight a court order for the return of the bodies to their original resting place in Qunu, the village where the elder Mandela grew up and later retired.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Todd Martens
U2 is a band that is used to big statements, political activism and rallying behind a cause. This past weekend, however, the band's larger-than-life frontman Bono was talking about the band's late-career efforts to simplify. Well, that and also his desire to get his hands on the "little gold" that is an Academy Awards statuette. Speaking by phone early Saturday from Washington, D.C., Bono described the band's 2009 effort "No Line on the Horizon" as "esoteric," and talked up the more human aspects of the group's Oscar-nominated song, "Ordinary Love.
WORLD
February 3, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan -- Nelson Mandela left an estate worth about $4.1 million -- a minuscule fortune compared to the wealth of many African leaders -- to his widow, Graca Machel; other family members; staff; and educational institutions, according to a reading of his will in South Africa on Monday. He also left a generous portion of the royalties from the sale of his books and other items to the African National Congress, to be distributed through a trust and used to promote the governing party's ideas and national reconciliation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - Bono took a look around the cluttered recording studio, filled with Coke bottles and laptops and vinyl records, and turned to a reporter. 'I'm not sure where we put the crack pipe," he deadpanned, pretending to riffle around a coffee table as he also poked at the band's workaholic image. "We usually leave it out for guests. " A moment later the U2 frontman had cranked up a track from the band's work-in-progress April album, an anthemic number about leaving one's hometown titled "Invisible.
WORLD
December 15, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
QUNU, South Africa - After the sermon was read, the 21-gun salute thudded and the "Last Post" played, Nelson Mandela was laid to rest Sunday in the rolling green hills of the Eastern Cape where he was born, leaving South Africans with a gaping sense that they will never see a leader as great as him again. The crowds left his grave site, a host of luxury vehicles drove away and a chilling downpour of rain blew in. About 4,500 mourners filled a vast domed tent for the state funeral, with relatives, princes, African leaders, celebrities and members of Mandela's ruling African National Congress arriving from dawn onward to say goodbye one last time.
WORLD
December 15, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
QUNU, South Africa - When South African President Jacob Zuma stood at the microphone before a sea of mourners, the first notes of his unexpected song for liberation hero Nelson Mandela were lonely and poignant. But the magic of the answering harmony of the mourners rose under a soaring, domed black ceiling that looked something like a night sky. It was a moment of pure joyful melody, richer and more dramatic than television could convey to South Africans in townships and cities who watched on big screens in soccer stadiums and parks or at home on television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2013 | SANDY BANKS
The long public farewell to Nelson Mandela will end on Sunday. After 10 days celebrating his life and mourning his death, South Africans will bury their leader in his family's village of grazing cows and one-room, tin-roofed shacks. Mandela leaves behind a troubled nation, still struggling to deliver on his dream of equality and advancement. But his legacy transcends that. His relentless battle against apartheid fueled a new strain of American activism among young people on college campuses who embraced a battle against injustice half a world away.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- As many South Africans woke up to the news that Nelson Mandela had died, it was Mandela's fellow Nobel laureate who provided the most comforting words. Mandela's legacy,  Desmond Tutu said Friday, would carry on. The sun would continue to rise. "The sun will rise tomorrow, and the next day and the next. ... It may not appear as bright as yesterday, but life will carry on," the retired Anglican bishop said in a statement. "To suggest that South Africa might go up in flames -- as some have predicted -- is to discredit South Africans and Madiba's legacy,"  Tutu said, using Mandela's clan name, a term of affection and respect.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Writer Nadine Gordimer was 39 years old when she sat in a Pretoria, South Africa, courtroom and watched Nelson Mandela receive a life sentence for acts of subversion against the South African state. Gordimer was already an activist then, and just beginning a career that would see her draw many precise portraits of the stubborn, idealistic and imperfect people of all races and creeds (East Indian, black, "colored," white, Jewish) who resisted apartheid. She eventually joined Mandela's African National Congress.
WORLD
December 14, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Nelson Mandela, cushioned in the comfortable blur of old age, never knew much about the scandals and corruption that have engulfed the party he believed in and its leader, President Jacob Zuma. What would the old man have thought? Rather than sailing into next year's elections in a sentimental fog of Mandela nostalgia, the African National Congress is finding that its mythologizing of Mandela has left many voters anxious and uncomfortable with the lack of a Mandela-style figure to lead the country out of its problems of mass unemployment and poor education and health services.
WORLD
December 14, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
QUNU, South Africa -- A fine strong bull was chosen in Qunu, Nelson Mandela's home village, to accompany him on his final journey. It must be slaughtered before Sunday's funeral, so that it may go with him to the other side, according to traditional belief. As Mandela was taken from Pretoria, where he lay in state for three days, to his home village of Qunu in the Eastern Cape, the chief of the clan, his grandson Mandla Mandela, and other elders were present. Dozens of family members were waiting at Nelson Mandela's homestead to receive his casket, where tradition called for the house to be freshly painted before he arrived, according to Qunu residents.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|