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Nelson R Mandela

NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Reuters
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will meet South African President Frederik W. de Klerk next week in Cape Town and black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela in Namibia, the State Department said Friday. Spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler announced the schedule of Baker's trip to take part Wednesday in marking Namibia's independence from South Africa. Baker is to spend only about five hours in Cape Town. He will also meet Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu and other black leaders.
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NEWS
March 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African black nationalist Nelson R. Mandela and ailing Oliver R. Tambo, president of the African National Congress, held an emotional reunion after 27 years. A jubilant crowd of Swedes and Africans greeted Mandela and his wife, Winnie, at the Stockholm airport after they arrived from Tanzania. Mandela, 71, and Tambo, 72, once law partners, had not seen each other since Mandela was jailed in South Africa 27 years ago and Tambo went into exile. They met at a castle near Stockholm.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Black nationalist Nelson R. Mandela pledged in Ethiopia that South African "freedom fighters" will struggle until they stop apartheid. Then he flew back to Tanzania to visit African National Congress military camps. Mandela spent only 24 hours in Ethiopia in a last-minute side trip during his 17-day tour, meeting President Mengistu Haile Mariam and addressing delegation chiefs from the Organization of African Unity.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | United Press International
Nelson R. Mandela on Tuesday welcomed his first visitors--his wife, daughter and three grandchildren--to a secluded, guarded house that is serving as his new prison, his lawyer said. Despite the setting in a scenic wine-producing district, the 70-year-old leader of the outlawed African National Congress leader is lonelier than before because he has no contact with other inmates, lawyer Ismael Ayob told a news conference.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush telephoned Nelson R. Mandela from the White House on Sunday, told him all Americans "were rejoicing at his release" after 27 years in South Africa's prisons and personally invited him to the White House. "He told me that he wanted to consult some of his colleagues, but that he expected he would be able to accept my invitation," the President told reporters in the Rose Garden late Sunday afternoon. "It was a very friendly conversation," Bush said.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | From United Press International
Heavily armed soldiers and police patrolled strife-torn areas of Natal province Tuesday, and reinforcements began mobilizing in an effort to halt a week of fighting that has left 55 dead, scores wounded and thousands homeless. Witnesses said there are many army troops in the ravaged area of the Edendale Valley on the outskirts of Natal's capital of Pietermaritzburg. The troops were first deployed when the fighting between rival black factions erupted a week ago.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | United Press International
Southern African and British Commonwealth nation leaders affirmed Wednesday that sanctions against South Africa must be maintained until the path toward a negotiated political settlement is irreversible. "We are all agreed that sanctions must go on," President Kenneth Kaunda told reporters after a meeting between anti-apartheid leader Nelson R. Mandela and seven African presidents, Commonwealth officials and other leaders.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | Reuters
Black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela may not be sent back to prison when he is discharged from the hospital, South Africa's Information Minister Stoffel van der Merwe said on Thursday. Van der Merwe, briefing foreign reporters, was asked whether Mandela could soon leave the hospital. "If he's not in need of immediate treatment any more, it becomes logical to move him somewhere else," he replied.
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