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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1999
Benjamin Schwarz wrote an interesting piece on neo-isolationism that made it, unsurprisingly, not the epithet that it has often come to be in recent years (Commentary, Oct. 29). However, it seems to me that his article dwelt in high, holy halls, not where most of us live. I'll agree that Senate Republicans who shot down the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty may not be neo-isolationists. If not that, then what are they? The term "obstructionists" comes to mind. But considering the damage to the U.S. and world that could arise from that vote, how about notoriously small-brained birds that hide their heads in the sand at the approach of danger?
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FOOD
April 25, 2014 | Jonathan Gold
The night of the lunar eclipse, I was having a late supper at Red Medicine out on Wilshire, a few tables over from a man who had decided to dress as Jesus for the evening, a slender young man with long, straight hair and white robes flowing around his ankles. I can't be sure, but I think he ordered the tasting menu. After dinner, I walked outside in time to see the last sliver of the moon disappear into the Earth's shadow. An elderly man plucked at my arm, eager to know what I was looking up at, and I pointed at the moon, at Mars shining bright and pink in its penumbra.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Robert Faturechi
Congregants at Temple Beth El who had gathered to celebrate the last night of Hanukkah were met by a group of neo-Nazi demonstrators who waved red-and-black swastika flags outside the Reform synagogue in Riverside on Friday evening. Rabbi Suzanne Singer said the demonstration was the third such protest at the temple in recent months. She said she thinks it was connected to a counter-protest held in September by members of the synagogue and others responding to a neo-Nazi protest at a day labor site.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung kicked off the Mobile World Congress conference in Barcelona this weekend by announcing the Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo smartwatches. The two devices are similar to the original Galaxy Gear, which was released just six months ago, but Samsung has made a few key changes, some of which may entice more users to purchase one of the two smartwatches. 1. Heart-rate sensor Not many users have wearable devices, but those who do tend to use their gadgets for fitness tracking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989 | THOMAS B. GOLD, Thomas B. Gold is an associate professor of sociology at UC Berkeley and a national fellow at the Hoover Institution. and
The ascension of Shanghai's Jiang Zemin to the hot seat of Chinese politics represents a victory for advocates of the theory of "neo-authoritarianism." Writing in various journals last winter, these theorists argued for the application to China of what they saw was the key to successful economic development in East Asia's "Four Dragons"--Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore and Hong Kong. In their view, the secret was a strong leader aided by dedicated advisers who could overcome all obstacles to push the economy forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990
Neo-Prussianism should be spotlighted as much as neo-Nazism ("East Germans Warned of Neo-Nazism," Part A, Dec. 28). Already East Germans are demanding return of parts of former Prussia now in Poland. Union with the European Community at Strasbourg is the road to the future. Reunion of the Germanys through the Brandenburg Gate is the road back to a bloodstained past. RICHARD CASTELAR SIMONSON Washington, D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1985
I offer "Yumneys" as the latest catchword of the '80s (young, upwardly mobile, neo-expressionists). P. TIERNEY Torrance
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1985
I very much enjoyed Elizabeth Venant's article spotlighting the four Neo-Expressionism artists ("Rebel Expressions," April 28). Too bad she didn't recognize one female artist as "brash" enough, "neo" enough, or "hot" enough to garner a mention. MARLEE HARRELL DAILEY Reseda
NEWS
July 28, 1991
I object to the term Neo-Neanderthalism. It is used to describe the apparent trend among men with low income, low self-esteem and imperfect bodies to assert their brutish dominance over women. First, there is nothing "neo" about it, just as there is nothing new about any form of bigotry. Second, "Neanderthalism," although it implies stupidity, also implies strength. I suggest we use a more honest, descriptive term like "Hostile Wimps." CAROL LAY Los Angeles
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung kicked off the Mobile World Congress conference in Barcelona this weekend by announcing the Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo smartwatches. The two devices are similar to the original Galaxy Gear, which was released just six months ago, but Samsung has made a few key changes, some of which may entice more users to purchase one of the two smartwatches. 1. Heart-rate sensor Not many users have wearable devices, but those who do tend to use their gadgets for fitness tracking.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | David Lazarus
What if a shadowy organization told you it had been quietly keeping its eye on you and had concluded that you were exactly the sort of person who should be privy to its secrets for wealth and power? What if that organization promised the success and youthful vitality of investment guru Warren Buffett and Viacom chief Sumner Redstone, who already possess these secrets? And what if all this could all be yours absolutely free? "I'd think it was a scam," said Los Angeles resident Jim York, 60, who recently received a 10-page letter from a recruiter identifying himself only as Bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
A lawyer for 13-year-old boy who killed his neo-Nazi father blasted a judge's decision Thursday to place him in a state-run juvenile justice facility for a maximum of 10 years, criticizing not only the ruling - a "miscarriage of justice" - but also the "antiquated" process.  "She got it wrong, we knew she would get it wrong," attorney Punam Grewal said of Judge Jean P. Leonard's ruling shortly after it was announced. The boy had been found guilty of second-degree murder and using a gun while committing a felony - crimes that carried a sentence of 40 years to life in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
A judge ruled Thursday that the Riverside County boy who killed his neo-Nazi father should be placed in a state-run juvenile justice center for a maximum of 10 years, rejecting an argument by the boy's lawyers that the facilities would be unable to meet his special needs. The boy, 13, had been found guilty of second-degree murder and using a gun while committing a felony - crimes that carried a sentence of 40 years to life in prison. But because he was charged as a juvenile, prosecutors said, he can be held in custody only until he is 23, and the judge mandated that a parole hearing be held after seven years, when he is 20. The sandy-haired boy with black glasses, who fidgeted through much of the proceedings, sat calmly as Judge Jean P. Leonard read her decision to a packed courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Both sides agreed that the boy was troubled, and that he had endured a lot in his 13 years -- being subjected to abuse and enveloped in a world of bigotry. But they diverge on how to place the boy, who was found guilty of killing his father, a neo-Nazi, shooting him in the head as the man slept on a couch in the living room two years ago.  During three days of arguments and testimony in a Riverside courtroom that concluded Wednesday, prosecutors maintained that he should be placed in a state-run juvenile facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2013 | Rick Rojas
Prosecutors want a 13-year-old boy found guilty of killing his neo-Nazi father to serve his sentence in a state-run juvenile facility. But attorneys for the boy say those places aren't equipped to handle their client's severe emotional and social disabilities. They're proposing other options, including private facilities.  A hearing began Friday to determine where he should spend the next decade of his life. A Riverside County judge found in January that the boy - who was 10 when he shot his father, Jeffrey Hall, in the head as he slept on a couch in the family's living room - possessed the mental capacity to know killing his father was wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Rick Rojas and Joseph Serna
A hearing began Friday to determine where a 13-year-old boy found guilty of killing his neo-Nazi father will spend the next decade of his life. Prosecutors are arguing that he be placed in a state-run juvenile justice center, but his attorneys say such facilities are not equipped to handle the boy's severe emotional and social disabilities. They have proposed other options, including private facilities. A Riverside County judge found in January that the boy - who was 10 when he shot his father, Jeffrey Hall, in the head as he slept on a couch in the family's living room - possessed the mental capacity to know that killing his father was wrong.
BOOKS
October 16, 1994
The "neo-Darwinian" theory of genetically programmed human selfishness, ably summarized in Sara Lippincott's Sept. 4 review of "The Moral Animal," is hardly Darwinian at all. In "The Descent of Man" Darwin speculated: "When two tribes of primeval man, living in the same country, came into competition, if (other circumstances being equal) the one tribe included a great number of courageous, sympathetic, and faithful members, who were always ready to warn each other of danger, to aid and defend each other, this tribe would succeed better and conquer the other."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1999
To blame President Clinton for lack of progress on legislation expanding foreign trade is laughable (Commentary, Nov. 10). Tom Plate seems to think it is the president's fault that the House of Representatives and the Senate are controlled by extremist, right-wing, neo-isolationist partisans who will do anything and everything to stop legislation that might reflect well on the president. What we need to do is get those dinosaurs out of a position of leadership and back in the minority where they belong.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Richard Montoya keeps a mental library of depictions of L.A. gleaned from "Chinatown," "Repo Man," "Mulholland Drive," the novels of James Ellroy, and other pop-culture texts. So when he began adapting his neo-noir stage drama "Water & Power" for the screen in 2007, as a Sundance Institute film fellow, it was natural for Montoya to seek advice from Walter Mosley, author of Angeleno classics such as "Devil In a Blue Dress," and one of Montoya's literary idols. Montoya quickly learned that he had a lot to learn about filmmaking.
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