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Nepal Government

NEWS
June 4, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the second declaration of a Nepali king's death in just four days, public anger and confusion intensified today and stone-throwing demonstrators took to the streets demanding to know the truth behind the slayings of Nepal's royal family. In an emergency meeting, the state council confirmed that King Dipendra had officially been declared dead early this morning. The council proclaimed Dipendra's uncle, Prince Gyanendra, who had been acting king, the new monarch.
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NEWS
August 16, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer and Associated Press
The arrests of a powerful aide to the king's youngest brother on a charge of attempted murder and a former national police superintendent on charges of corruption and drug smuggling have rocked the peaceful mountain kingdom of Nepal. The scandal has touched even the famous Gurkha troops of Nepal, 8,000 of whom serve in the Queen's Guard of the British army.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Satyan Man Rajbhandari, his arm in a sling and the rest of his body badly bruised, stood before two senior government ministers and nearly 100 of his fellow doctors Tuesday night and described what happened the night that democracy came to this remote Himalayan kingdom. After him came another doctor, and then another. And sitting there listening to all this, and to the cries of outrage that the accounts elicited, was King Birendra's interior minister, Nain Bahadur Swanr.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three years, a septuagenarian workaholic who suffers from fainting spells served as prime minister of Nepal as the poor, isolated Shangri-La experimented with parliamentary democracy. This week, assailed by lawmakers he thought were his allies as well as by opposition Communists, the beleaguered Girija Prasad Koirala resigned. Elections have been called for Nov. 13. The jury is still out on Koirala's performance.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Ah, Miss Barbara," the old tour guide said, as Barbara Adams drove away from the Hotel Yak and Yeti, her long hair billowing like a silver flame out of her ancient white convertible. "Ah, Miss Barbara," the guide repeated, pointing toward the disappearing image and shaking his head. "She was once a queen."
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
King Birendra has agreed to let an opposition alliance head an interim government, a leader of the 7-week-old pro-democracy movement reported Friday. A separate opposition statement said it was willing to allow the king to head the government, but it would step in if he chose not to. The king, who has generally stayed above the daily management of the government, was believed unlikely to assume its leadership.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | Associated Press
The government of Nepal has abolished the death sentence, saying Sunday that the punishment was considered inconsistent with its new multi-party political system. Sunday's announcement that capital punishment laws enacted by the previous government have been repealed was the latest in a series of decisions by Prime Minister Krishna Prasad Bhattarai's administration toward distancing itself from past policies.
NEWS
September 11, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
Parliament ousted the Communist government that has led this small Himalayan nation for nine months, heralding a transfer of power away from Marxism. The main opposition party, the Nepali Congress, introduced a no-confidence motion last week that passed, 107 to 88. Prime Minister Man Mohan Adhikari, 74, sent his resignation to King Birendra, who accepted it and asked him to remain in office until ministers are chosen to replace him.
WORLD
February 20, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
A recent recording making the rounds in Nepal featured a Maoist party leader speaking to a man with a Chinese accent. During the 12-minute tape, the Chinese voice offers $6.9 million to bribe 50 Nepali legislators for help in forming a Maoist-led government that would favor China over India. Whether the tape is genuine, whether the voice is really that of a Chinese official and whether India's intelligence wing released it as part of a propaganda exercise haven't been established.
WORLD
February 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
King Gyanendra announced a 10-member Cabinet dominated by his own supporters, one day after he dismissed Nepal's government, declared a state of emergency and blocked telephone and Internet connections. Gyanendra will head the Cabinet, state radio said. The United Nations, Britain, India and the United States were among those who criticized the king's actions. Australia advised its citizens not to travel to Nepal.
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