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NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Two policemen were killed and 10 were injured in Nepal as Maoist rebels attacked a security post with the backing of at least 6,000 supporters, police said. The raid appears to be the latest attack in a new offensive by the Maoists since the June 1 massacre of most of Nepal's royal family by the crown prince. The rebels' overnight raid took place in Khilatpur, 190 miles west of Katmandu, the capital.
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NEWS
April 28, 2002 | Reuters
The government said Saturday that soldiers killed 35 Maoist rebels who launched a string of violent attacks across the kingdom in an effort to enforce their five-day general strike. Devendra Raj Kandel, the junior home affairs minister, said soldiers shot and killed 18 rebels Saturday in Khotang district, about 150 miles east of Katmandu, Nepal's capital. Earlier, a Defense Ministry spokesman said troops had killed 17 rebels since Friday evening in various parts of Nepal.
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NEWS
April 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Suspected Maoist rebels attacked a remote police post in western Nepal, killing 29 police officers, the Interior Ministry said. State radio said two civilians also were killed in the clash late Friday. Interior Ministry spokesman Gopendra Bahadur Pandey said 12 police officers were injured in the clash. Deputy Prime Minister Ram Chandra Poudel blamed the attack on Maoist rebels, who are fighting against the Himalayan kingdom's constitutional monarchy.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | From Associated Press
Communist rebels killed at least 129 police, soldiers and civilians in unprecedented attacks in northwestern Nepal on Sunday, officials said, undermining prospects for peace in this poor Himalayan kingdom still recovering from the shock of a massacre at the royal palace last year. The attacks on government offices and an airport were the deadliest since the rebels began fighting to topple the constitutional monarchy in 1996.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
King Birendra announced a general amnesty for Nepalese prisoners, most of whom were convicted of pro-democracy activities under the regime ousted in April. The number freed was not announced. Hundreds were believed to have been killed and thousands imprisoned during the uprising, which led to creation of a multi-party interim government. Birendra gave up his claim to an absolute monarchy and has been working with the government to create a new constitution.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
The prime minister of Nepal faced possible ouster because of a rebellion in his own party Thursday, as 56 lawmakers drafted a no-confidence motion against him. The lawmakers are angered over Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala's failure to quell a Maoist insurgency and provide stability--the same charges Koirala made when he led the ouster of his predecessor in March.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police fired on demonstrators demanding an end to the Himalayan nation's 29-year-old ban on political parties, killing three people and wounding 12, witnesses said. Kamal Thapa, minister of state for communications, said police trying to control "extremists" in a clash in Bhaktapur, near the capital of Katmandu, had to fire "when the crowd tried to create an unpleasant scene."
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jyoti Bagra Shakya had never thought much about democracy until last week. At 50, his entire life had been his grimy, one-room sweets shop. The poverty endemic to this remote Himalayan kingdom had largely isolated him from news of the extraordinary wave of democracy that has been sweeping much of the outside world.
NEWS
November 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Maoist rebels bombed a Coca-Cola factory Thursday in the first attack in the capital since a state of emergency was imposed in this Himalayan kingdom earlier in the week. No one was injured, police said. The two bombs exploded before workers arrived, damaging equipment and an exterior wall, police said. Troops took up positions around the Balaju industrial area where the factory is located.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nepal's new prime minister and Maoist rebels announced a cease-fire and agreed to hold talks to end the five-year insurgency that has left at least 1,600 people dead. Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba, who took office Sunday, declared a unilateral cease-fire and called on rebels to talk peace. Deuba's call came amid a rebel offensive that was in part responsible for his predecessor's resignation.
NEWS
December 3, 2001 | Reuters
A state of emergency in this Himalayan nation is directed at Maoist guerrillas fighting to overthrow the constitutional monarchy, Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba said Sunday, as more troops were deployed to quell the uprising. "I want to assure you the emergency is directed only against the terrorists, their supporters and agencies," Deuba told reporters. "Others have nothing to fear."
NEWS
November 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Maoist rebels bombed a Coca-Cola factory Thursday in the first attack in the capital since a state of emergency was imposed in this Himalayan kingdom earlier in the week. No one was injured, police said. The two bombs exploded before workers arrived, damaging equipment and an exterior wall, police said. Troops took up positions around the Balaju industrial area where the factory is located.
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
Government leaders met to consider tough anti-terrorism measures Saturday, after Maoist rebels launched a wave of attacks that ended a four-month cease-fire and killed at least 42 soldiers and police. The rebels, who are fighting to topple Nepal's constitutional monarchy, swooped down on an army post, police stations and government installations across the Himalayan nation late Friday, killing 14 soldiers and at least 28 police, said Khum Bahadur Khadka, minister of physical planning and works.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nepal banned public meetings for a month, hoping to block a 200,000-strong rally planned by Maoist rebels this week in the capital, Katmandu. The previous day, the government's second round of talks with the guerrillas ended in a deadlock. The government banned all public meetings and rallies for one month in the Katmandu Valley, fearing trouble during the Maoist rally, scheduled for Friday. The demonstration venue is less than half a mile from the king's palace and the prime minister's office.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nepal's new prime minister and Maoist rebels announced a cease-fire and agreed to hold talks to end the five-year insurgency that has left at least 1,600 people dead. Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba, who took office Sunday, declared a unilateral cease-fire and called on rebels to talk peace. Deuba's call came amid a rebel offensive that was in part responsible for his predecessor's resignation.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
Maoist rebels attacked police stations in three remote mountain villages in central Nepal, killing at least 38 police officers and seriously injuring two others, officials said Saturday. The deadliest attack was in Bichaur, a village about 100 miles northwest of Katmandu, when rebels attacked a police station late Friday, killing 22 officers. Details of the attack were sketchy, but police in Katmandu, the capital, said officers battled with the rebels until Saturday morning.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
Maoist rebels attacked police stations in three remote mountain villages in central Nepal, killing at least 38 police officers and seriously injuring two others, officials said Saturday. The deadliest attack was in Bichaur, a village about 100 miles northwest of Katmandu, when rebels attacked a police station late Friday, killing 22 officers. Details of the attack were sketchy, but police in Katmandu, the capital, said officers battled with the rebels until Saturday morning.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | Reuters
The government said Saturday that soldiers killed 35 Maoist rebels who launched a string of violent attacks across the kingdom in an effort to enforce their five-day general strike. Devendra Raj Kandel, the junior home affairs minister, said soldiers shot and killed 18 rebels Saturday in Khotang district, about 150 miles east of Katmandu, Nepal's capital. Earlier, a Defense Ministry spokesman said troops had killed 17 rebels since Friday evening in various parts of Nepal.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Two policemen were killed and 10 were injured in Nepal as Maoist rebels attacked a security post with the backing of at least 6,000 supporters, police said. The raid appears to be the latest attack in a new offensive by the Maoists since the June 1 massacre of most of Nepal's royal family by the crown prince. The rebels' overnight raid took place in Khilatpur, 190 miles west of Katmandu, the capital.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Suspected Maoist rebels attacked a remote police post in western Nepal, killing 29 police officers, the Interior Ministry said. State radio said two civilians also were killed in the clash late Friday. Interior Ministry spokesman Gopendra Bahadur Pandey said 12 police officers were injured in the clash. Deputy Prime Minister Ram Chandra Poudel blamed the attack on Maoist rebels, who are fighting against the Himalayan kingdom's constitutional monarchy.
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