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NEWS
August 19, 2010
A growing body of evidence is suggesting that exposure to organophosphate pesticides is a prime cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD. The findings are considered plausible to many experts because the pesticides are designed to attack the nervous systems of insects. It is not surprising, then, that they should also impinge on the nervous systems of humans who are exposed to them. Forty organophosphate pesticides are registered in the United States, with at least 73 million pounds used each year in agricultural and residential settings.
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NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Since opening its doors two years ago, the National Institutes of Health's Undiagnosed Diseases Program has been deluged with requests for medical sleuthing assistance, especially among people with neurological symptoms. In a summary of the agency's work thus far, published Thursday, leaders of the Bethesda, Md.,-based program said more than half of the cases they have accepted involve undiagnosed symptoms of the brain and central nervous system. Undiagnosed disorders involving pain, psychiatric symptoms and the gastrointestinal and immune systems also cropped up more frequently.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2007 | Ann Powers;Randy Lewis;Natalie Nichols
LCD Soundsystem Sound of Silver (DFA/EMI) **** JAMES MURPHY, foreman of the New York electro wrecking crew LCD Soundsystem, is a kind of clubland Lenny Bruce. In songs concocted from whatever's been spilled on the dirty dance floor since punk first went nightclubbing around 1980, Murphy yelps in the voice of a late-night party crasher, smacking the "in" crowd -- post-post-punks, aging club kids, jaded Brooklynites -- with observations that entice and insult.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
A growing body of evidence is suggesting that exposure to organophosphate pesticides is a prime cause of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD. The findings are considered plausible to many experts because the pesticides are designed to attack the nervous systems of insects. It is not surprising, then, that they should also impinge on the nervous systems of humans who are exposed to them. Forty organophosphate pesticides are registered in the United States, with at least 73 million pounds used each year in agricultural and residential settings.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Texas and Belgian researchers have identified a novel genetic defect as the cause of a little-known, inherited disease of the peripheral nerves. Based on their discovery, the scientists have devised a simple blood test that for the first time makes possible a simple, painless diagnosis of the disorder, called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, or CMT.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1988 | Associated Press
A study has found that the fatter people are, the more lethargic is their sympathetic nervous system, the built-in regulator that switches the body into high gear during emergencies and exertion. The research supports the growing belief that fat people don't always get that way simply because they are gluttonous eaters. Instead, they may have an inborn tendency to put on weight and keep it on. "We are saying that body fat or weight is somehow regulated, just like blood pressure is," said Dr.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Since opening its doors two years ago, the National Institutes of Health's Undiagnosed Diseases Program has been deluged with requests for medical sleuthing assistance, especially among people with neurological symptoms. In a summary of the agency's work thus far, published Thursday, leaders of the Bethesda, Md.,-based program said more than half of the cases they have accepted involve undiagnosed symptoms of the brain and central nervous system. Undiagnosed disorders involving pain, psychiatric symptoms and the gastrointestinal and immune systems also cropped up more frequently.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | From Reuters
A mystery epidemic of a nervous-system disease that has swept across Cuba, affecting up to 26,000 people, appears to be easing slightly, Cuban doctors said Friday. "The epidemic is showing a tendency to decrease as a whole . . . only a little, but decreasing," Dr. Raul Gomez Cabrera, director of the Hermanos Ameijeiras hospital in Havana, told a news conference.
NEWS
July 9, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
People who have eaten watermelons contaminated with the pesticide aldicarb get sick because the chemical blocks an enzyme involved in the transmission of nerve impulses that help regulate a wide variety of organ functions. The symptoms of aldicarb poisoning include nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pains and excessive sweating.
NEWS
August 16, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators have concluded that the gas cloud that escaped Sunday from a Union Carbide Corp. plant in Institute, W. Va., was not primarily aldicarb oxime but rather was about two-thirds methylene chloride, a nervous system toxin and a suspected cause of cancer in laboratory animals, The Times has learned.
HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
As they seek to document and demystify one of life's great thrills, scientists have run across some real head-scratchers. How, for example, can they explain the fact that some men and women who are paralyzed and numb below the waist are able to have orgasms? How to explain the "orgasmic auras" that can descend at the onset of epileptic seizures -- sensations so pleasurable they prompt some patients to refuse antiseizure medication?
HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | By Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
AS they seek to document and demystify one of life's great thrills, scientists have run across some real head-scratchers. How, for example, can they explain the fact that some men and women who are paralyzed and numb below the waist are able to have orgasms? How to explain the "orgasmic auras" that can descend at the onset of epileptic seizures -- sensations so pleasurable they prompt some patients to refuse antiseizure medication? And how on Earth to explain the case of the amputee who felt his orgasms centered in that missing foot?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2007 | Ann Powers;Randy Lewis;Natalie Nichols
LCD Soundsystem Sound of Silver (DFA/EMI) **** JAMES MURPHY, foreman of the New York electro wrecking crew LCD Soundsystem, is a kind of clubland Lenny Bruce. In songs concocted from whatever's been spilled on the dirty dance floor since punk first went nightclubbing around 1980, Murphy yelps in the voice of a late-night party crasher, smacking the "in" crowd -- post-post-punks, aging club kids, jaded Brooklynites -- with observations that entice and insult.
NEWS
October 30, 2005 | Mariana Minaya, The Baltimore Sun
People in life-threatening predicaments can sometimes perform feats that seem impossible, exhibiting superhuman strength or surviving for days in the wilderness to save themselves or others. It's hard to believe a 4-year-old girl could keep her stricken grandfather afloat for several hours. But it happened this summer in Herring Bay, a part of the Chesapeake, when the 60-year-old man began sinking while swimming and the girl supported his body until rescuers arrived.
HEALTH
August 22, 2005 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
FOR years, pain, stiffness and fatigue clung to Lauren Armistead like an invisible shroud. It was tough enough to live with fibromyalgia -- but the skepticism she encountered when she discussed her condition was intolerable. "Throw out a word like fibromyalgia and you'll get this blank stare," the 28-year-old said recently, sitting in her Santa Monica apartment. "For so long, it was my own private battle."
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Agricultural pesticides are disrupting the nervous systems of frogs in Yosemite National Park and elsewhere in the Sierra Nevada, which could explain why many amphibians have undergone dramatic declines in the mountains, federal scientists announced Thursday. The scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Department of Agriculture discovered that commonly used pesticides suppress an enzyme in frogs that controls the nervous system.
SPORTS
July 20, 1991 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You probably already knew this, but if a neurotransmitter chooses to spaz on its way from one nerve cell to another with, say, 240 pounds somewhere between a clean and a jerk, some unsuspecting lifter could be left forever singing soprano. And you thought weightlifting was all about muscle? As a lifter might say, get a grip! This is a sport in which brain comes long before brawn. At least that is the way Bob Takano explains it.
HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | By Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
AS they seek to document and demystify one of life's great thrills, scientists have run across some real head-scratchers. How, for example, can they explain the fact that some men and women who are paralyzed and numb below the waist are able to have orgasms? How to explain the "orgasmic auras" that can descend at the onset of epileptic seizures -- sensations so pleasurable they prompt some patients to refuse antiseizure medication? And how on Earth to explain the case of the amputee who felt his orgasms centered in that missing foot?
BUSINESS
November 3, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Medtronic Inc. said Monday that it has agreed to buy Sofamor Danek Group Inc., the biggest maker of spinal implants, for $3.6 billion in stock to double its sales of devices to treat nervous-system disorders and injuries. Medtronic will issue $115 in stock for each Sofamor share, or 13% more than Sofamor's closing price Friday of $101.63. Sofamor jumped $8.50 on Monday to $110.13, and shares of Medtronic, the biggest pacemaker company, gained $1.56 to $66.56, both on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
Brimming with thousands of crickets, snails and other creatures, shuttle Columbia soared into orbit Friday on a two-week mission that NASA expects to provide the best look yet at how the brain and nervous system adapt and develop in weightlessness. "It's a little bit like a Cecil B. De Mille production: years in the making, cast of thousands and it went off like it was supposed to," said Joseph Bielitzki, chief veterinarian for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
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