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Netcom Online Communication Services Inc

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BUSINESS
March 25, 1997 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charting a new direction for money-losing Internet service providers, San Jose-based Netcom On-Line Communications Services announced Monday that it will put restrictions on its heavy users and offer better service for customers who are willing to pay more. "There is a significant segment of our customers who say, 'I want to get on when I want to get on,' " said David Garrison, chief executive at Netcom, which, with 580,000 customers, is one of the nation's largest service providers.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 1997 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charting a new direction for money-losing Internet service providers, San Jose-based Netcom On-Line Communications Services announced Monday that it will put restrictions on its heavy users and offer better service for customers who are willing to pay more. "There is a significant segment of our customers who say, 'I want to get on when I want to get on,' " said David Garrison, chief executive at Netcom, which, with 580,000 customers, is one of the nation's largest service providers.
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BUSINESS
December 19, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly three years after pioneering the market for flat-rate Internet access, Netcom On-line Communication Services announced Wednesday that it would stop offering unlimited access to the global computer network for $19.95 a month. As many companies have come to embrace flat-rate pricing in recent months, the resulting increase in demand has led to lapses in service. That calls into question the ability of companies to continue offering online access at current rates.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly three years after pioneering the market for flat-rate Internet access, Netcom On-line Communication Services announced Wednesday that it would stop offering unlimited access to the global computer network for $19.95 a month. As many companies have come to embrace flat-rate pricing in recent months, the resulting increase in demand has led to lapses in service. That calls into question the ability of companies to continue offering online access at current rates.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1997
San Jose-based Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc. said it appointed Dan Yost to the newly created position of president and chief operating officer. Yost was president of AT&T Wireless Services' Southwest region. . . . Scotts Valley-based Seagate Technology Inc. said it has invested $10 million in closely held Gadzoox Microsystems Inc. of San Jose to help develop and market high-end disk drives for computer networks.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc. said two of its original investors have resigned from the company's board. The Internet access provider said Lawrence Lepard and Ofer Nemirovsky, both 38, resigned, bringing the number of members on its board to five. Netcom didn't say why they left. It said it doesn't plan on replacing the board members. The San Jose-based company released the news after the close of U.S. trading. Netcom shares fell 75 cents to close at $13 on Nasdaq, an all-time low.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc. said it began offering a new $24.95-a-month Internet business service last week, the first of a series of new products aimed at companies with one to 1,000 employees. The San Jose-based Internet service provider announced in December that it would move away from the $19.95-a-month flat-rate consumer service that it helped pioneer in favor of more profitable business services. The company plans to introduce a series of services priced between $24.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1998 | Reuters
A group of activists has backed down from a threat to disrupt business at Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc. after the company took steps to cut the number of marketing messages it allowed its customers to post on the Internet. The group had threatened to delete or cancel all messages originating from Netcom bound for Usenet--a sort of electronic bulletin board where Internet users post messages discussing topics from nuclear physics to politics to Madonna.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | Jack Searles
Explorer Communication, a Simi Valley producer of computer fax-modem systems, has joined forces with a San Jose company to provide Internet access to laptop computer users. The agreement calls for Explorer to combine its fax-modem cards with the software of the Northern California firm, NETCOM On-Line Communication Services Inc. The deal marks a marketing departure for Explorer, which previously sold its products largely through mail-order merchants.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1996 | From Reuters
Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc.'s network-wide outage last week serves as a warning sign of the difficulties even the largest Internet service providers face in meeting soaring growth rates. The San Jose-based Internet access provider said the outage--which lasted more than 13 hours, including the "prime time" for home usage on Tuesday evening--had ended by Wednesday morning, but acknowledged it was an embarrassment that could hurt its reputation.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to boost sales of high-powered computers to corporate customers, AST Research Inc. said one of its new machines will offer access to the Internet through a special arrangement with Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc. The deal introduces a new element to the bundles of software and other goodies that computer manufacturers increasingly package with their machines.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1996 | Bloomberg Business News
Stocks of Silicon Valley companies fell last week, led by Internet software maker Netscape Communications Corp. and Netcom On-Line Communication Services Inc., an Internet connection provider. The Bloomberg Silicon Valley Index dropped 8.05, or 4.6%, to 166.84, an 11-week low. The index, a price-weighted list of 53 high-technology companies, has fallen 15% since reaching a 52-week high of 196.39 on May 20. Netscape posted the biggest weekly loss on the index, tumbling $6.875 to $55.
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