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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Netflix's next international launch will be in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, the subscription video giant announced late Tuesday. The company will launch its streaming video service in Scandinavia by the end of 2012. It did not announce further details, except that it will give subscribers a mix of Hollywood movies and television shows along with local content for a monthly fee. Netflix previously said it would launch in a new European market later this year. The Times reported in 2011 that it was considering Scandinavia along with Spain and a combination of the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Belgium.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before finding out why I'm not hosting the Emmys. The Skinny: It is never fun giving a cat medicine. Try giving your cat three different doses if you really want frustration. I'm pretty sure Skinny isn't enjoying it either. Today's roundup includes the weekend box office preview. Also, lots of debate over the FCC's proposed new Net neutrality rules, and Seth Meyers will host this year's Emmy Awards. Have a great weekend. Daily Dose: Aside from consumer groups and media watchdogs, Netflix has emerged as the most vocal opponent of Comcast's proposed acquisition of Time Warner Cable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Carl Icahn has amassed a nearly 10% stake in Netflix Inc., boosting the sagging stock of the subscription video service but also making some wary that the activist investor will make waves for management. The billionaire has quietly acquired about 5.5 million shares since early September, buying stock at an average price of $58 a share - well off its peak of $298.73 in July 2011. The opportunistic Icahn said the company's stock is undervalued, given its influential role in technological changes that are revolutionizing how consumers watch movies and television shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
"The Killing," the cop series that wouldn't stay dead, will return for its final season on Netflix on Aug. 1. For those who remain skeptical, this is really the end. The series, which began on AMC in 2011, stars Mireille Enos and Joel Kinnaman as Seattle homicide detectives whose lives play second fiddle to their all-consuming murder investigations that span entire seasons.  "The Killing" was canceled after its second season, but Fox Television...
BUSINESS
September 3, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
After Greg Harty rolls out of bed in his Sherman Oaks apartment, he grabs a cup of coffee and starts his work day at a desk in the corner of his living room. His assignment: Watch three episodes of "Modern Family. " As the hit sitcom plays, the aspiring screenwriter opens another window on his laptop and pulls up a spreadsheet. He begins picking labels - his employer, Netflix, calls them tags - to describe what he sees. The comedy: "quirky. " The humor: "light dark. " The tone: "humorous," "irreverent" and "heartfelt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
  Sometimes the Internet can amplify big ideas. Other times it's an echo chamber for random noise. The latter is the case when it comes to the so-called streamageddon at Netflix, in which various bloggers opined about the loss of titles from the subscription service's streaming library - no doubt causing panic among Netflix susbscribers wondering just what they would be getting for their monthly subscription fees. It turns out, the great "Netflix purge" of 2013 was wildly exaggerated.  PHOTOS: Cable vs. broadcast ratings The rumblings started when a site called "Instant Watcher," which monitors the comings and goings of movie and television titles, got the ball rolling, reporting that 1,794 titles, including some classic James Bond films such as "Dr. No" and "Goldfinger," would disappear on May 1. Other mainstream news sites, including CNN Money, picked up the story and attributed the development to Netflix's evolution from broad digital distributor to more selective programmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
In a world where mobile phones, game consoles and a growing number of technologies talk back to consumers, Netflix is giving its movie and TV recommendation service a voice. Netflix has unveiled a talking, human-like interface named “Max,” who greets subscribers with a game-show host's exuberance and invites them to play irreverent games, such as “Max's Mystery Call” and “Celebrity Mood Ring.” It seeks to inject humor into the analytical process of offering viewing suggestions - and to further differentiate the service from competitors such as Amazon.com or Hulu.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Netflix said it plans to let its deal to carry Nickelodeon, BET and MTV content expire next month, even though it continues to discuss licensing certain shows. The video subscription service said it has been moving away from broad, multi-year deals with networks and cable channels, in favor of more selective licensing arrangements to carry programs that will work best for its subscribers. Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings, in a letter to shareholders, said a recent deal with Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Netflix Inc. has unveiled new social features to make it easier for subscribers to discover new TV shows and movies and discuss them with their friends. Starting Wednesday, subscribers to Netflix's streaming service can link their accounts to Facebook, allowing them to see what their friends have watched. Through this integration, new recommendations will appear in the subscriber's Netflix queue under rows labeled "Friends' Favorites" and "Watched by your friends. " In a nod to privacy considerations, Netflix subscribers can opt to share what they've watched only within the Netflix experience -- or choose to share viewing information on Facebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The competition between Amazon and Netflix for content is good news for PBS. Last week, Amazon.com struck a deal with PBS for kids' shows "Caillou," "Arthur" and "Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood" as well as episodes of "Nova," "Masterpiece" and Ken Burns documentaries. Earlier this year, Amazon landed subscription video rights to repeats of "Downton Abbey. " PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Now Netflix has renewed and expanded its own deal with PBS. Some of the content Netflix will have rights to overlap with Amazon, but it also has exclusive rights to certain shows, including the murder mystery "The Bletchley Circle" and "Super Why!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before hearing about the Aereo case at the Supreme Court. The Skinny: The Supreme Court on Tuesday morning will hear arguments in the ABC vs. Aereo case. Aereo is an Internet startup that broadcasters charge steal their signals. Alas, I won't be there, but I have a high court story for you anyway. When I was based in Washington, I occasionally covered the Supreme Court. You have to dress nice and they will wake you if you doze off. Other stories in Tuesday's Fix include Netflix saying it will raise prices and Comcast posting its second-quarter results.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Here's one group that's happy about Netflix's planned price hikes: Wall Street. The video giant said Monday it will soon raise prices for new customers of its streaming service by  $1 or $2 a month as it bets its growing slate of original content will continue to draw subscribers. Existing customers will continue to pay current prices for a time.  Wall Street analysts praised the coming hikes as a way to drive profitability as...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Higher prices are the new black for Netflix. The Los Gatos, Calif., streaming video company plans to raise prices for new customers by $1 or $2 a month this quarter, the company said Monday in its quarterly earnings release. Existing customers will continue to pay the current prices for "a generous time period," the company said. Access to the company's streaming video library currently costs $7.99 a month for suscribers in the United States, and Netflix has been experimenting with pricing models as it spends to improve its selection of movies and television shows and builds out its slate of original content.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
A plunge in once-soaring technology shares sent Nasdaq into a triple-digit decline and yanked the rest of the stock market down with it. Erstwhile darlings such as Netflix Inc. and Facebook Inc., as well as biotechnology highfliers such as Intercept Pharmaceuticals Inc., sank Thursday as investors fled many names they had favored just a few weeks ago. The sell-off was less a result of economic developments as it was the hard reality of a...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Tribune Digital Ventures, the technology and innovation arm of Tribune Co., has agreed to acquire TV by the Numbers, a source of television ratings analysis and programming news, the company said Thursday.  Tribune Digital Ventures is also relaunching its entertainment website Zap2it to focus on helping consumers discover programming to watch on traditional TV and streaming services, including Netflix, Amazon and Hulu.  Financial details were...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Rhys Darby, who played personal manager (and New Zealand deputy cultural attache) Murray Hewitt on HBO's "Flight of the Conchords," has created a series in which to star. "Short Poppies" gets a U.S. premiere Thursday via Netflix, all eight episodes at once, only a couple of days after it bows in its native New Zealand. The title plays off "tall poppies," a common Commonwealth phrase, borrowed from the Greeks to describe persons of accomplishment or quality whose distinction can also make them targets.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In "Lilyhammer," whose eight parts debut Monday as an exclusive Netflix stream, Steven Van Zandt retrieves his Silvio wig from the "Sopranos" costume box to play Frank "The Fixer" Tagliano, a New York mobster who retreats into witness protection in Lillehammer, Norway. He remembers the town from broadcasts of the 1994 Winter Olympics as a place of "clean air, fresh white snow, gorgeous broads" and figures it will be the last place anyone would think to look for him. You know how that will go. To say that this is the first original series from the video rental giant is not to say that it originated with the company.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2011
Netflix Inc cut its third-quarter forecast by 1 million U.S. subscribers, sending its shares down nearly 15 percent, after a price increase earlier this month caused customers to shy away from its DVD-only service. In what Wall Street has called a "rare, large and surprising misstep" by Netflix Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings and his team, the company said it would have 24 million subscribers at the end of the third quarter, down from a prior forecast of about 25 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Amazon.com Inc. has officially entered the Internet video streaming set-top box market. Dubbed Fire TV, the Seattle online retailer's new $99 offering features a small remote control, voice search capability, online gaming and video applications including Netflix, Hulu Plus, WatchESPN, Showtime and YouTube. Notably, HBO Go is not yet on Fire TV, but an Amazon spokesman said the company is working with the pay-TV network to make it available. To be sure, Amazon Fire TV users would still need a pay-TV subscription to HBO to access HBO Go. The long-anticipated device is also the latest platform for Amazon's own Netflix rival Prime Instant Video, which the company hopes will attract people to its $99-a-year Prime service that gives subscribers free two-day shipping and access to its on-demand streaming library as well as original shows.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Amazon has been making deals with programmers to get more content for its service.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Netflix CEO Reed Hastings took to his company's blog this week to call for the implementation of strong net neutrality rules. Hasting's blog post comes about two months after a federal appeals court disallowed government regulations that ensured equal access to the Internet for all users and companies. This concept of equal access to the Internet is known as net neutrality. "To ensure the Internet remains humanity's most important platform for progress, net neutrality must be defended and strengthened," Hastings wrote.
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