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HEALTH
November 27, 2006 | Eric Jaffe, Special to The Times
EVERY week for two years, Michael Hammett stared at a computer screen, trying to open a flower with his mind. Hammett had developed a case of carpal tunnel syndrome so severe he needed surgery. But being a former opiate abuser, he refused to use the medications that would be needed to control the resulting pain. Having already tried physical therapy, he set his mind on another alternative: neurofeedback.
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HEALTH
November 27, 2006 | Eric Jaffe, Special to The Times
EVERY week for two years, Michael Hammett stared at a computer screen, trying to open a flower with his mind. Hammett had developed a case of carpal tunnel syndrome so severe he needed surgery. But being a former opiate abuser, he refused to use the medications that would be needed to control the resulting pain. Having already tried physical therapy, he set his mind on another alternative: neurofeedback.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1995
Now that we have discovered how to turn a buck in harnessing brain waves to play computer games ("Look Ma, No Mouse," Sept. 20), perhaps more consumers will realize that these same brain waves are being used in neurofeedback therapy with great success. Unfortunately, most of the people who could use this help never get to the financial section of your newspaper. GERALD SCHNITZER, Ph.D Los Angeles
BUSINESS
October 8, 1995
Now that we have discovered how to turn a buck in harnessing brain waves to play computer games ("Look Ma, No Mouse," Sept. 20), perhaps more consumers will realize that these same brain waves are being used in neurofeedback therapy with great success. Unfortunately, most of the people who could use this help never get to the financial section of your newspaper. GERALD SCHNITZER, Ph.D Los Angeles
HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | By Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
AS they seek to document and demystify one of life's great thrills, scientists have run across some real head-scratchers. How, for example, can they explain the fact that some men and women who are paralyzed and numb below the waist are able to have orgasms? How to explain the "orgasmic auras" that can descend at the onset of epileptic seizures -- sensations so pleasurable they prompt some patients to refuse antiseizure medication? And how on Earth to explain the case of the amputee who felt his orgasms centered in that missing foot?
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Cassandra Willyard
Inside the human skull lies a 3-pound mystery. The brain - a command center composed of tens of billions of branching neurons - controls who we are, what we do and how we feel. "It's the most amazing information structure anybody has ever been able to imagine," says Dr. Walter Koroshetz, deputy director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Md. For centuries, the brain's inner workings remained largely unexplored. But all that is changing.
SPORTS
January 15, 2008 | Jonathan Abrams, Times Staff Writer
Pamela Kaman can recount all the times she struggled with her son, Clippers center Chris Kaman, to get him to take his medication while he was growing up. It was a hassle. Chris Kaman was an intelligent, but rambunctious, youth. "There was constant uproar with him," Pamela Kaman said. "You couldn't do normal things. You couldn't go to the movies as a family. It would always turn into a big thing."
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Lat Ware placed the NeuroSky headset on my 10-year-old son's head and then began making the adjustments. The device detects brain waves, and then digitizes them. Ware, 28, had to make sure the headset was picking up the right waves before the real fun could begin.  Once everything was set, Ware provided some simple rules. Look at the computer screen where he had just launched the demo version of his work-in-progress video game called, "Throw Trucks With Your Mind!" Concentrate on one object, in this case a kind of futuristic tank sitting in a large chamber.
OPINION
February 26, 2006 | Edward M. Hallowell, EDWARD M. HALLOWELL is the coauthor, with John J. Ratey, of "Driven to Distraction," "Delivered from Distraction" and other books about ADD.
I WAS STUNNED to read that an advisory panel recently recommended that the Food and Drug Administration apply its most stringent warning to Ritalin and other stimulant medications commonly used to treat attention deficit disorder. The ominously named "black box" warning is affixed to drugs deemed especially dangerous. But these drugs have been in use for nearly 70 years. Why a black box warning now? I'm a psychiatrist who has ADD.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2005 | Rachel Abramowitz and Stacie Stukin, Special to The Times
For those who knew Gerald Levin as the almost Machiavellian 80-hour-a-week chief executive of AOL Time Warner, it will be hard to imagine him as he was this summer in a boat off the Caribbean island of Bimini. When a group of dolphins came swimming by, Levin, although not a great swimmer, donned his snorkel and jumped in. "It was an unbelievable metaphysical experience. You're entering their world," says Levin softly. As he recalls the moment, his voice is modulated to just above a whisper.
HEALTH
September 15, 2003 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Some parents of children diagnosed with attention deficit disorder will try just about anything to avoid drug treatment -- homeopathy, chiropractic, massage, even faith healing. "There's a label, a stigma that goes with drug treatment," said Dr. Regina Bussing, a child psychiatrist at the University of Florida who conducted a recent survey of 1,600 families in that state.
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