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SCIENCE
September 9, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Forget the FBI or Scotland Yard. When it comes to solving the grisly murder of a young, beautiful gold mining heiress, the only person who could possibly crack the case is a writer (and maybe a neurologist.) While authors published in the journal Neurology usually confine themselves to discussions of nervous system disorders, the journal's latest issue asks readers to complete an unfinished mystery penned by a late Neurology editor and pillar of his field, Dr. Robert Joynt. In addition to heading the American Academy of Neurology and the American Neurological Assn., Joynt was a man of encyclopedic knowledge who deeply enjoyed the mysteries of Sherlock Holmes.
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HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Starting in her 30s, Barbara Schulties began suffering from debilitating headaches, which she describes as "someone taking a hot poker to my eye. " Besides excruciating head pain, the Santa Cruz resident lists a host of accompanying symptoms: nausea, vomiting, dizziness, difficulty focusing and hypersensitivity to light, noise and even wind on her face. "I can't spell," she says, describing a typical headache. "It's very hard for me to visualize words. " Like 12% of people in the U.S., and 1 out of 3 women over a lifetime, Schulties suffers from migraine disorder, an inherited condition that affects the regulation of nerve signals in the brain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1998 | CHRISTINE CASTRO and JAMES MEIER
UC Irvine recently named Dr. Mark Fisher, a noted neurologist who specializes in the treatment of strokes, as its chairman of the College of Medicine's department of neurology. He will replace Dr. Stanley van den Noort, who remains on the faculty as a professor. As chairman, Fisher will supervise the department's clinical and academic programs. He also will help establish a stroke center at UCI Medical Center in Orange, providing comprehensive emergency and long-term treatment to stroke victims.
SCIENCE
September 9, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Forget the FBI or Scotland Yard. When it comes to solving the grisly murder of a young, beautiful gold mining heiress, the only person who could possibly crack the case is a writer (and maybe a neurologist.) While authors published in the journal Neurology usually confine themselves to discussions of nervous system disorders, the journal's latest issue asks readers to complete an unfinished mystery penned by a late Neurology editor and pillar of his field, Dr. Robert Joynt. In addition to heading the American Academy of Neurology and the American Neurological Assn., Joynt was a man of encyclopedic knowledge who deeply enjoyed the mysteries of Sherlock Holmes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1995 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine's burgeoning neuroscience programs have received another boost: a $1-million grant to fund joint research in neurobiology among scientists of different disciplines, officials said Monday. Scientists see the grant from the Lucille P. Markey Charitable Trust as a seed to start a grand initiative: the gathering of 14 of UCI's most illustrious minds and young academic talent to explore new ways to diagnose and treat diseases of the nervous system.
HEALTH
September 30, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease when they're taken regularly long before any symptoms arise. A study appearing in the Sept. 24 issue of Neurology, a journal of the American Academy of Neurology, bolsters the thinking among many Alzheimer's doctors that aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs somehow protect brain cells against the ravages of the memory-robbing disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The next president of the University of Redlands will be Ralph W. Kuncl, a neurology professor who has been the provost and executive vice president at the University of Rochester, school officials announced Saturday. Kuncl is expected in mid-August to succeed James R. Appleton, who has served as president of the University of Redlands for more than 20 years over two non-consecutive terms. The private university, which enrolls 4,700 students, offers undergraduate and graduate programs at its main Inland Empire campus in Redlands and satellite facilities throughout Southern California.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Prescribing psychotropic medications to normal, healthy kids who want to boost their academic performance is "not justifiable" because it contravenes a physician's responsibility to promote a child's "authentic" development and to protect him or her against coercion by parents or peers, a group of neurologists and bioethicists has asserted. When older adolescents who are closer to the age of autonomy (or their parents) ask for such medications, arguments against the practice are weaker, the group concluded.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Starting in her 30s, Barbara Schulties began suffering from debilitating headaches, which she describes as "someone taking a hot poker to my eye. " Besides excruciating head pain, the Santa Cruz resident lists a host of accompanying symptoms: nausea, vomiting, dizziness, difficulty focusing and hypersensitivity to light, noise and even wind on her face. "I can't spell," she says, describing a typical headache. "It's very hard for me to visualize words. " Like 12% of people in the U.S., and 1 out of 3 women over a lifetime, Schulties suffers from migraine disorder, an inherited condition that affects the regulation of nerve signals in the brain.
HEALTH
May 30, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's 8:15 a.m., and the meeting you're supposed to be running started 15 minutes ago, and your boss would be on the phone chewing you out except that your phone has died, which is why you can't call for someone to come fix your flat tire. Here you are, stuck at the side of the freeway, a sitting duck to get rear-ended. That's what's going on in your car. But what's going on in your brain? Stress, that's what. Your sympathetic nervous system has released a surge of norepinephrine, famously preparing you for "fight or flight" (both of which have appeal in your present circumstances)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison
More than 250,000 people living in a broad swath of eastern Los Angeles, Boyle Heights, Huntington Park and other southeast cities face a "chronic hazard" from exposure to arsenic emissions from a Vernon battery recycler, according to air district officials. Toxic emissions from the Exide Technologies plant have the potential to create "neurological changes, specifically a decrease in intellectual function in children," said Jean Ospital, health effects officer for the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
SCIENCE
September 5, 2013 | By Monte Morin
What could a neurologist possibly have in common with such legendary fictional sleuths as the hard-drinking Philip Marlowe, the impossibly perceptive Sherlock Holmes or even rumpled Detective Colombo?  Pretty much everything, say two experts. In an offbeat paper published Wednesday in the journal Practical Neurology, authors argue that detective stories have been part of the  fabric of neurology ever since it became a discrete medical specialty. When searching for clues to make a diagnosis about a nervous system disorder, neurologists employ a distinctly Holmesian alter ego, according the study's coauthors, Dr. Peter Kempster, a neurologist at Australia's Monash Medical Center, and Andrew Lees, professor of neurology at University College London.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla
Dick Van Dyke is suffering from an as-yet "undiagnosed neurological disorder" and has been advised to rest and avoid plane travel until doctors know what the veteran showman is dealing with, according to his rep. "My head bangs every time I lay down," the 87-year-old said Wednesday on Twitter . "I've had every test come back that I'm perfectly healthy. Anybody got any ideas?" The tweet sparked dozens of responses, some serious and others joking. Comic Elayne Boosler advised him against sleeping on the drum kit. VIDEO: Dick Van Dyke reflects on his career One immediate effect of doctors' advice was the nixing of a trip to New York next week to receive the first Lifetime Achievement Award for Bettering Humanity Through Comedy from the 92nd Street Y . The cancellation was because of "fatigue and lack of sleep resulting from symptoms of a yet-to-be diagnosed neurological disorder," his rep told " Entertainment Tonight ," which first reported the news.  "Dick is otherwise in good physical condition but the fatigue factor has become acute," his rep told USA Today in a statement that included the caution against air travel.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Prescribing psychotropic medications to normal, healthy kids who want to boost their academic performance is "not justifiable" because it contravenes a physician's responsibility to promote a child's "authentic" development and to protect him or her against coercion by parents or peers, a group of neurologists and bioethicists has asserted. When older adolescents who are closer to the age of autonomy (or their parents) ask for such medications, arguments against the practice are weaker, the group concluded.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012
MUSIC Neurology meets performing arts in the Long Beach Opera's staging of Michael Nyman's "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat," a work based on the book by Oliver Sacks published in 1985. With the central hero of Sacks' work essentially being music as a man struggles to make sense of the world while struggling with visual agnosia, the 1 hour, 15 minute production should be a sight to behold. Expo Building, 4321 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach. Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 7 p.m. Through June 24. $29-$150.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The next president of the University of Redlands will be Ralph W. Kuncl, a neurology professor who has been the provost and executive vice president at the University of Rochester, school officials announced Saturday. Kuncl is expected in mid-August to succeed James R. Appleton, who has served as president of the University of Redlands for more than 20 years over two non-consecutive terms. The private university, which enrolls 4,700 students, offers undergraduate and graduate programs at its main Inland Empire campus in Redlands and satellite facilities throughout Southern California.
NEWS
June 28, 1989
Augustus S. Rose, founding chairman of the Department of Neurology at UCLA Medical Center when it started in 1951 and one of a handful of doctors chosen to serve as a Distinguished Physician by the Veterans Administration, died of cancer Sunday at his home in Brentwood. He was 81. Rose had remained head of the UCLA department until his retirement in 1974. Sherman M. Mellinkoff, former UCLA Medical School dean, said, "Under Dr. Rose's leadership, the Department of Neurology achieved national and international respect.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Essential tremor is the most common type of tremor disorder. The trembling of the hands, head or voice can be insignificant and require no treatment. But other people have severe symptoms and can benefit from medical intervention. New guidelines published Wednesday by the American Academy of Neurology should help doctors explain treatment options to their patients and spur more research into the condition, which affects an estimated 10 million Americans. The condition, which usually starts after age 40, can be treated with the high blood pressure drug propranolol and the seizure drug primidone.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The confirmed high rates of domestic abuse -- or interpersonal violence -- led two major physicians' groups this week to call for routine screening of patients for signs of abuse. On Monday, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists released a statement urging its members to screen women "at periodic intervals" for intimate partner violence. Pregnant women should be screened during prenatal visits, they said. About 25% of U.S. women have been physically or sexually assaulted by a current or former partner, the ACOG report notes.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"The Descendants" Ad Hominem Enterprises U.S. release: Nov. 18 The premise Elizabeth King (Patricia Hastie) is in a water skiiing accident off Waikiki Beach. She suffers severe head trauma, falls into a deep coma and is maintained on life support for more than three weeks. Her husband, Hawaiian land baron Matthew King (George Clooney), must now assume full care of their two daughters while coping with the news that his wife had been having an affair and was preparing to leave him. Elizabeth's physician, Dr. Johnston (Milt Kogan)
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