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SCIENCE
May 13, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
The number of autism cases has nearly doubled in California in the last four years, and the rate of increase appears to be accelerating, according to a study by the state Department of Developmental Services. The report, scheduled to be released today, found that the number of people with autism who are receiving services from the department rose from 10,360 in December 1998 to 20,377 by the end of December 2002 -- a 97% increase.
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HEALTH
December 16, 2002 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
For generations scientists have studied the peacock feathers of human mating, the swish and swagger that advertise sexual interest, the courtship dance at bars, the public display. They've left the private experience -- what's happening in the brain when we fall for someone -- mostly to poets. We know there's an inborn human urge to mate, after all. Love is a mystery, a promise, an arrow from Cupid's bow.
HEALTH
September 30, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease when they're taken regularly long before any symptoms arise. A study appearing in the Sept. 24 issue of Neurology, a journal of the American Academy of Neurology, bolsters the thinking among many Alzheimer's doctors that aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs somehow protect brain cells against the ravages of the memory-robbing disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2001 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
USC President Steven B. Sample has told his faculty that he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, but does not expect the condition to affect his tenure at the university or his ability to lead it. "It is an honor and a privilege for me to serve as president of this wonderful institution," Sample, 61, said in a letter to USC faculty and staff in early September. "I have no intention of letting Parkinson's stand in the way."
BUSINESS
December 4, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Cephalon Inc., which makes neurological drugs, agreed to buy French drug maker Group Lafon for $450 million in cash. By gaining full control of Lafon's Provigil drug for narcolepsy, Cephalon expects to add about $80 million in sales and 3 cents a share to earnings in 2002. The West Chester, Pa.-based drug maker increased its 2002 earnings forecast to $1.03 a share. Sales will be $400 million to $410 million, Cephalon said.
HEALTH
December 3, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL
What does your brain look like while it's deciding between buying a bicycle or a camera, taking a warm bath or having dinner, eating a slice of chocolate cake or apple pie? Gray and furrowed, of course, much as usual. Not, however, if you use clever imaging techniques to highlight what parts of its circuitry are buzzing or resting as it ponders its options and deftly makes its choices. Dr.
NEWS
March 12, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a Sherman Oaks schoolroom, 17-year-old Tom Iland is sitting through one of his toughest classes. It's not science: Tom is good at science. Not math: When he was in ninth grade, he tested as equivalent to a college senior in math. The class is "social skills," and Tom is poring over the importance of smiling and frowning at the proper time and place. "When you use appropriate facial expressions," he reads, "you may avoid getting into trouble. You may make a good impression.
NEWS
November 6, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Neural stem cells, which promise treatments for currently incurable brain ailments and spinal cord injuries, may be far easier to obtain from adult tissues than anyone had thought, new research released Sunday indicates. Potent but politically charged, neural stem cell research may prove to be the first effective way to undo the damage of spinal cord injuries, strokes and a host of debilitating brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis.
HEALTH
August 7, 2000 | From Hartford Courant
The patients may feel a disconcerting tingle travel up their arm and settle on their tongue. Or they may smell something that isn't there, or inexplicably experience the taste of salt or lemon. Sometimes, even the weight of their clothes becomes unbearable. These are some of the hidden agonies that sufferers of migraine headaches usually do not talk about, said Dr.
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