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Neutrality

NEWS
February 15, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German Prime Minister Hans Modrow, his feelings hurt and his plea for financial aid rejected, left Bonn on Wednesday promising that his lame-duck government will press for economic reform before the national elections scheduled for next month. Modrow, who had conferred Tuesday with Chancellor Helmut Kohl and other West German officials, met with West German businessmen and industrialists Wednesday before returning to East Berlin.
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NEWS
March 15, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first meeting of the two Germanys and the four victorious World War II powers on the subject of German unity was held here Wednesday, and the participants agreed to invite Poland to attend sessions at which the Polish-German border issue is discussed. The head of the host West German delegation, diplomat Dieter Kastrup, said that at this first meeting, the Germanys, the United States, the Soviet Union, Britain and France discussed procedural questions and an agenda for further meetings.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators had expected to reach agreement this year on German unification and conventional arms control, but the two issues have become so intertwined that an East-West deadlock seems likely. According to diplomatic analysts in West European capitals, Soviet negotiators have slowed the momentum of the conventional arms control talks in Vienna and the strategic missile talks in Geneva, as well.
WORLD
March 3, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - When left-leaning President Joao Goulart was deposed by the Brazilian military in 1964, the nation's major news media, controlled by a few wealthy families, celebrated. But during the 21-year dictatorship that followed, the government censored the newspapers and television stations the families operated. Things are different now. Since 2003, Brazil has been run by the popular left-of-center Workers' Party, known as PT, which has left the news media alone. But the publications and TV stations, still controlled by the same families, have been critical of the party, despite a public approval rating for President Dilma Rousseff as high as 78%. Not a single major news outlet supports her, with some newspapers and magazines particularly harsh in their criticism.
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