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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By John Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Former Nevada Assemblyman Steven Brooks was arrested near Barstow after a high-speed chase, hours after being expelled from the Legislature because he was “potentially dangerous.” Brooks, 41, was arrested about 7 p.m. Thursday on Interstate 15 at Stoddard Wells Road, officials said. He was being held in the San Bernardino County Jail in Rancho Cucamonga on $100,000 bail, jail officials told the Los Angeles Times. Authorities said it was unclear why Brooks was in California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By John Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Former Nevada Assemblyman Steven Brooks was arrested near Barstow after a high-speed chase, hours after being expelled from the Legislature because he was “potentially dangerous.” Brooks, 41, was arrested about 7 p.m. Thursday on Interstate 15 at Stoddard Wells Road, officials said. He was being held in the San Bernardino County Jail in Rancho Cucamonga on $100,000 bail, jail officials told the Los Angeles Times. Authorities said it was unclear why Brooks was in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Mary Gojack, an Iowa native who came to Nevada to deal blackjack and ended up one of a handful of women ever elected to the Nevada Legislature, died of cancer Tuesday at a Reno hospital at the age of 49. Earlier this year, when she was honored by the American Civil Liberties Union for her battles on behalf of women and minorities, she told the assemblage that she had cancer and faced "a tough fight."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
STATELINE, NEV. - The blue waters of Lake Tahoe framed the stunning backdrop as the politicians orated. There were some droning Nevadans and three always-interesting Californians: Sen. Dianne Feinstein, U.S. Rep. Tom McClintock and Gov. Jerry Brown. This was a "save the lake" crowd, heavy on environmental concerns, attending the 16th Annual Lake Tahoe Summit inaugurated in 1997 by President Clinton. The recent event was basically designed as a pep rally for continued slow growth and environmental regulation.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | United Press International
Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Thursday that he spent two nights in Las Vegas and Reno mingling with the homeless while disguised as a bum and was startled by the experience. "It was a real eye-opener to find out how important it is just to have a bed," Reid said at a news conference after making the disclosure in an address to a joint session of the Nevada Legislature. Reid said that when he goes to work in the morning in Washington, he sees people sleeping on grates on the sidewalk.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Bob Revert drove his four-wheel-drive pickup off Highway 95 and headed east for 14 miles in a cloud of dust across open desert, over an unmarked dirt trail full of rocks and chuckholes, to reach America's newest county. Revert had taken the easiest ground route to Bullfrog County, the only county in the United States without people.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
U.S. Sen. Harry Reid urged bipartisanship in a speech Friday to Nevada lawmakers--but later criticized President Bush's pick for attorney general, John Ashcroft. The Democratic minority whip in the U.S. Senate told the Democrat-controlled state Assembly and GOP-run state Senate that cooperation always has figured in Nevada's ability to deal with crises. Reid also said he and Sen. John Ensign, R-Nev., are working together despite their hard-fought election battle in 1998.
SPORTS
July 12, 1997 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a swift response to the furor over Mike Tyson's 10% fine, Nevada Gov. Bob Miller signed a bill Friday that allows the state to fine a fighter his full purse if he engages in the kind of activity that led to Tyson's disqualification in his fight here June 28 against Evander Holyfield. Previously, the Nevada State Athletic Commission could fine a maximum of $250,000, or 10% of the purse, whichever was higher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1988
I would appreciate your paper printing this letter as a correction to Ron Taylor's article on legal brothels in Nevada (Part I, Aug. 8). As a former elected official and a present candidate, I have always attempted to work with the press and answer all questions honestly and forthrightly. Taylor complained to me he was having a difficult time obtaining comments on the subject of prostitution from Nevada elected officials and, after reading his article, I can understand why. Let us please set the record straight!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
STATELINE, NEV. - The blue waters of Lake Tahoe framed the stunning backdrop as the politicians orated. There were some droning Nevadans and three always-interesting Californians: Sen. Dianne Feinstein, U.S. Rep. Tom McClintock and Gov. Jerry Brown. This was a "save the lake" crowd, heavy on environmental concerns, attending the 16th Annual Lake Tahoe Summit inaugurated in 1997 by President Clinton. The recent event was basically designed as a pep rally for continued slow growth and environmental regulation.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The Nevada Legislature has taken the first step in demanding that the federal government make amends for massive radioactive contamination left by decades of nuclear weapons testing on a swath of desert the size of Rhode Island. In a joint resolution, the state's Senate and House are asking the federal government to contain and mitigate about 300 million curies of contamination left in the soil and water of the former Nevada Test Site, about 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The Energy Department detonated 921 nuclear warheads underground before testing ended in 1992.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2009 | Mark Z. Barabak
When Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid came home recently to address the Nevada Legislature, a small but vocal band of Republican protesters gathered at the state Capitol. They waved signs, razzed Democrats and marched outside. But the group fell silent when asked the chances of ousting Reid at the polls next year. "It's going to be tough," demonstrator Carol Howell, 65, finally said. Inside, Reid illustrated one reason why. Speaking to a bipartisan group of lawmakers, he touted hundreds of millions of dollars headed for Nevada under the economic stimulus legislation he helped push through Congress.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
U.S. Sen. Harry Reid urged bipartisanship in a speech Friday to Nevada lawmakers--but later criticized President Bush's pick for attorney general, John Ashcroft. The Democratic minority whip in the U.S. Senate told the Democrat-controlled state Assembly and GOP-run state Senate that cooperation always has figured in Nevada's ability to deal with crises. Reid also said he and Sen. John Ensign, R-Nev., are working together despite their hard-fought election battle in 1998.
SPORTS
July 13, 1997 | GREG LOGAN, NEWSDAY
Less than two weeks after Mike Tyson was disqualified for biting in his rematch with WBA heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield, the Nevada state legislature, recognizing the importance of the boxing industry to the state, passed a bill allowing the state athletic commission to take a fighter's entire purse for a poor performance instead of 10 percent. Gov. Bob Miller signed the law at 9 a.m. Friday and it was put to the test 32 hours later.
SPORTS
July 12, 1997 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a swift response to the furor over Mike Tyson's 10% fine, Nevada Gov. Bob Miller signed a bill Friday that allows the state to fine a fighter his full purse if he engages in the kind of activity that led to Tyson's disqualification in his fight here June 28 against Evander Holyfield. Previously, the Nevada State Athletic Commission could fine a maximum of $250,000, or 10% of the purse, whichever was higher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1988
I would appreciate your paper printing this letter as a correction to Ron Taylor's article on legal brothels in Nevada (Part I, Aug. 8). As a former elected official and a present candidate, I have always attempted to work with the press and answer all questions honestly and forthrightly. Taylor complained to me he was having a difficult time obtaining comments on the subject of prostitution from Nevada elected officials and, after reading his article, I can understand why. Let us please set the record straight!
NATIONAL
March 7, 2009 | Mark Z. Barabak
When Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid came home recently to address the Nevada Legislature, a small but vocal band of Republican protesters gathered at the state Capitol. They waved signs, razzed Democrats and marched outside. But the group fell silent when asked the chances of ousting Reid at the polls next year. "It's going to be tough," demonstrator Carol Howell, 65, finally said. Inside, Reid illustrated one reason why. Speaking to a bipartisan group of lawmakers, he touted hundreds of millions of dollars headed for Nevada under the economic stimulus legislation he helped push through Congress.
SPORTS
July 13, 1997 | GREG LOGAN, NEWSDAY
Less than two weeks after Mike Tyson was disqualified for biting in his rematch with WBA heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield, the Nevada state legislature, recognizing the importance of the boxing industry to the state, passed a bill allowing the state athletic commission to take a fighter's entire purse for a poor performance instead of 10 percent. Gov. Bob Miller signed the law at 9 a.m. Friday and it was put to the test 32 hours later.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Bob Revert drove his four-wheel-drive pickup off Highway 95 and headed east for 14 miles in a cloud of dust across open desert, over an unmarked dirt trail full of rocks and chuckholes, to reach America's newest county. Revert had taken the easiest ground route to Bullfrog County, the only county in the United States without people.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | United Press International
Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Thursday that he spent two nights in Las Vegas and Reno mingling with the homeless while disguised as a bum and was startled by the experience. "It was a real eye-opener to find out how important it is just to have a bed," Reid said at a news conference after making the disclosure in an address to a joint session of the Nevada Legislature. Reid said that when he goes to work in the morning in Washington, he sees people sleeping on grates on the sidewalk.
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