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NEWS
April 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
A day after their union filed a business profits tax petition, more than 300 teachers from across Nevada rallied Saturday for the proposed measure, which seeks to improve schools. The teachers waved placards and cheered after leaders unveiled details of the proposal at the annual meeting of the 22,000-member Nevada State Education Assn. Union leaders say the demonstration shows Nevada teachers are solidly behind the proposed 4% business net profits tax, despite pleas from Gov.
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NEWS
April 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
A day after their union filed a business profits tax petition, more than 300 teachers from across Nevada rallied Saturday for the proposed measure, which seeks to improve schools. The teachers waved placards and cheered after leaders unveiled details of the proposal at the annual meeting of the 22,000-member Nevada State Education Assn. Union leaders say the demonstration shows Nevada teachers are solidly behind the proposed 4% business net profits tax, despite pleas from Gov.
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NEWS
October 1, 1988
Joe Matthews, 78, the father of Nevada's property tax-slashing Question 6 initiative in the late 1970s. Matthews patterned the initiative after California's Proposition 13. It would have limited property taxes to no more than 1% of the full cash value of the real estate. It also would have rolled back the cash value of the property to 1975 levels and would have limited increases in that value to no more than 2% a year.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Residents in only four states are taxed less than people living in Nevada, according to the latest issue of Money magazine that lists the Silver State as a "tax haven" as opposed to a "tax hell." And Gov. Bob Miller's office said today that finding, along with Inc. magazine's recent ranking of Nevada as No. 1 for "business climate," shows the growing state is gaining national attention for its favorable tax climate.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Residents in only four states are taxed less than people living in Nevada, according to the latest issue of Money magazine that lists the Silver State as a "tax haven" as opposed to a "tax hell." And Gov. Bob Miller's office said today that finding, along with Inc. magazine's recent ranking of Nevada as No. 1 for "business climate," shows the growing state is gaining national attention for its favorable tax climate.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1986 | Associated Press
Nevada has led the nation in attracting new business in the last five years, according to a University of Nevada-Reno study that backs up claims made by some state officials. An annual average of nearly 48 new companies for every 1,000 Nevadans was incorporated between 1980 and 1985. The study, conducted by UNR economist John Dobra, found an average of 13 new incorporations in California for every 1,000 residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed ballot measure to permit casino-type gambling in California, provided it stays within 10 miles of the Nevada border, was introduced Thursday by a Los Angeles assemblyman who said the California treasury would be the big winner. Similar plans to legalize slot machines, blackjack, craps, roulette and other casino games of chance have been talked about in the Capitol in the past, but never approved.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Budget trouble extends far beyond California. Here's a rundown of other strapped states: Arizona -- Republican Gov. Jan Brewer kept state government running but rejected funding levels for K-12 schools and said she was calling a special session next week to increase school funding. Connecticut -- Gov. M. Jodi Rell vetoed the Democrats' proposal and was meeting privately with legislative leaders about a new two-year tax-and-spending plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Terrell Croft Drinkwater, the former Western Air Lines president who enlisted a champagne-drinking parrot to help build a financially troubled regional carrier into an international airline that boasted it was "the only way to fly," died Saturday of pancreatic cancer in his West Los Angeles home. Drinkwater, 76, was the longest serving chief executive in Western's history, retiring after 22 years in 1970.
OPINION
August 27, 2009 | Ethan Rarick, Ethan Rarick is the director of the Robert T. Matsui Center for Politics and Public Service at UC Berkeley and the author, most recently, of "Desperate Passage: The Donner Party's Perilous Journey West."
In case you haven't heard, California and Nevada are at war. Not an old-fashioned war with bullets and tanks, but a newfangled media battle over which one is the last best hope for entrepreneurs and businesses in these troubled times. Nevada started it. The Nevada Development Authority launched a campaign that will spend a million dollars over a year to air a series of ads enticing California businesses to move to Las Vegas. The spots boast about Nevada's low taxes and workers' comp fees and feature a chimpanzee and a really bad actress portraying a television newswoman who turns into a pig wearing bright red lipstick.
NEWS
October 1, 1988
Joe Matthews, 78, the father of Nevada's property tax-slashing Question 6 initiative in the late 1970s. Matthews patterned the initiative after California's Proposition 13. It would have limited property taxes to no more than 1% of the full cash value of the real estate. It also would have rolled back the cash value of the property to 1975 levels and would have limited increases in that value to no more than 2% a year.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Brian Sandoval vaulted into the governor's mansion without saying much. He didn't really need to. His Republican primary rival, Gov. Jim Gibbons, was a mess of marital shenanigans and campaign blunders, such as evoking Nazi Germany to zing Sandoval. His Democratic opponent, Rory Reid, proved as troublesome as a fly; Sandoval rarely had to fend off attacks, and he won by nearly 12 percentage points. It helped that the handsome Sandoval was so gubernatorial in visage and voice that, in political cartoons, he often resembled Clark Kent.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charlie Dromgoole, president of the Abilene Chamber of Commerce, attended a convention in Anaheim last month to lasso a few local companies and herd them to the great state of Texas. His line of work was becoming fiercely competitive, he said. Every state, city, county, and burg in the gall darn United States seemed to be hiring representatives to help coax companies into relocating, especially from California.
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