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Neville Brothers

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2010
MOVIES "A Fool There Was" Before there was Megan Fox or Angelina Jolie or Marilyn Monroe, there was the original film vamp, Theda Bara. The silent film actress embodied carnal desire — but few of her films survive today. Cinefamily, as part of its Silent Sirens series, will screen "A Fool There Was," a 1915 film from Frank Powell that finds Bara merely casting her sights on various men, leading them down a woeful path of spiritual degradation. Cinefamily , 611 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2010
MOVIES "A Fool There Was" Before there was Megan Fox or Angelina Jolie or Marilyn Monroe, there was the original film vamp, Theda Bara. The silent film actress embodied carnal desire — but few of her films survive today. Cinefamily, as part of its Silent Sirens series, will screen "A Fool There Was," a 1915 film from Frank Powell that finds Bara merely casting her sights on various men, leading them down a woeful path of spiritual degradation. Cinefamily , 611 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of the 1980s, the Neville Brothers' story was bittersweet. The band's obvious excellence and originality brought it deep admiration among cultists and critics. But its failure to reach a mainstream audience was always a cause for sympathy. Stars like Linda Ronstadt, Keith Richards and Huey Lewis would sing the praises of the Nevilles, who play the Baccahanal tonight (sold out) and Sunday, and sometimes try to give them a boost with opening slots on their high-profile tours.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1999
One song on the upcoming Chris Cornell album, now scheduled for September release, is a touching tribute to the late Jeff Buckley, titled "Wave Goodbye." . . . Ishmael Butler (previously known as Butterfly), the main force in inventive hip-hop group Digable Planets, is set to release his first solo album, "Ishmael Since 1999," in late June on Pendulum/Red Ant. The set is said to be an evolution from the psychedelia-tinged love groove of Digable, which released its last album three years ago. . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
The Neville Brothers play soul music in at least, oh, seven-eighths of its various and sundry permutations. It's a busy sound, with the four Nevilles backed by another three band members, but even in its most frenzied moments the group isn't out to simply wring every sweat module it can out of the music. The Nevilles play a kinder, gentler soul--albeit one that would still spook George Bush, and maybe Lee Atwater, too.
NEWS
October 15, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The Scene: A welcome-to-L.A. party for the Neville Brothers, the musical group that is to New Orleans what the Grateful Dead is to San Francisco. A&M Records hosted the event Thursday night at Cha Cha Cha in East Hollywood, in the midst of the brothers' seven-night stand (with Linda Ronstadt) at the Universal Amphitheater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1991 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's heartening to know that just months after the Milli Vanilli lip-syncing scandal showed us how low pop music has sunk, the Neville Brothers could make their first San Diego appearance as headliners of a real concert venue, having finally graduated from nightclubs. Not only that, but the celebrated New Orleans rhythm-and-blues quartet's concert Saturday night at the Spreckels Theatre was sold out. The place only seats a little over a thousand people, but hey, it's a start.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Any television special that offers Ed Bradley singing "Sixty Minute Man"--and getting down with his bad self, as they say, in the process--would be essential viewing. That's the least of the reasons, though, to tune in "The Neville Brothers: Tell It Like It Is," an episode of "Cinemax Sessions" that puts the New Orleans rock/R&B/reggae family band together with a host of pop talents, some even more musically gifted than the "60 Minutes" journalist. (The show premieres on Cinemax at 10 p.m. Sunday, with repeat airings Wednesday, next Saturday and May 29.)
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
The Neville Brothers capture the spirit of Mardi Gras as completely as Bing Crosby or Charles Dickens embody the spirit of Christmas. So, with Mardi Gras coming next month, it seemed apt to start an interview with Cyril Neville, the youngest of the four New Orleans rhythm and blues brothers, by asking for his most vivid memory of his hometown's annual celebration.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
How would you like to place a Super Bowl Sunday bet on a team that is virtually guaranteed to play with power, exuberance, intelligence, deft mobility, an amazingly varied attack and supreme cohesion? The tip here is to save the cash you might be inclined to risk on the Redskins or the Bills, and put it on the Neville Brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's something wildly contradictory about the idea of Aaron Neville's delicate, falsetto vocals emanating from a man who looks like he could crush your spine into powder. With his scowling countenance and a huge, muscled frame sporting a bevy of jailhouse-ugly tattoos, this is a man who would seem at home playing the part of a heel in a professional wrestling match. Neville has a tattoo of a dagger adorning his face, for God's sake!
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Much like the Grateful Dead and your obnoxious Uncle Ernie, neither of whom get much airplay and yet maintain enduring notoriety, the Neville Brothers, all over the radio like polka songs at a Metallica show, have a zillion fans worldwide. Few, it seems, are radio programmers. These legendary, Grammy Award-winning performers will bring their New Orleans brand of R & B, jazz, soul, rock, reggae and whatever else is left to the Santa Barbara County Bowl for a 7 p.m. Saturday show.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, Jim Washburn is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to the Times Orange County Edition.
The concerts at the Orange County Fair are moving to a larger venue this year, from the 6,000-capacity Arlington Theatre to the mammoth Pacific Amphitheatre, though that isn't necessarily going to make getting a seat any easier. The Pacific can seat 18,765, but the fair will only be employing the 8,500 fixed seats. The lawn area will be closed, fair representatives say, to avoid the noise problems that led to the demise last year of the Pacific as a commercial concert site.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
The nightly concerts at the Orange County Fair will have a bigger, fancier venue this year, but the musical slant and the profile of the performers remain about the same. For the first time, headliners will perform in the 8,500-seat Pacific Amphitheatre, which the fair acquired last year in a $12.5-million buyout of a long-term lease held by the Nederlander Organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1994 | DENNIS HUNT
The Neville Brothers, who performed at the sold-out Wadsworth Theatre in Westwood on Friday night, have gotten awfully lazy. Not that their show didn't rouse the audience, because it did, judging from the way most of the fans were dancing and obviously having a grand time grooving to the grab-bag of R&B, rock, jazz and pop. But the Nevilles--Aaron, Art, Charles and Cyril--seemed to be on cruise control most of the time.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is that a tomato on your face or is that your nose? --Charlie McCarthy to W. C. Fields Gin blossoms are a bloom generally indigenous to that well-worn stool at the end of the Skid Row dive that opens promptly at 6 a.m. This type of blossom aptly describes the capillaries that blow up on your face when you drink your dinner too often. Gin Blossoms is also a pop-rock band out of Tempe, Ariz. No one particularly needs either kind of bloom this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Aaron Neville and his three brothers have been telling it like it is for decades now. And fans have been telling friends, and those friends told more friends--but it took a friend in high places, Linda Ronstadt, to help turn the word-of-mouth trickle about the Neville Brothers into a torrent. Predict that they're gonna be huge, though, and you might be accused of being the boy who cried wolf.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Undoubtedly, some among the millions who just discovered Aaron Neville, the linebacker-size songbird, as a featured duet partner on the recent Linda Ronstadt album will buy this fine new Neville Brothers effort. If they expect anything close to those cozy Aaron 'n' Linda love songs, though, they're in for a surprise. Here Aaron shares the vocal spotlight, the syncopation rarely lets up and the brothers stick black consciousness and Jesus right in your face.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN and Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent).
* * * The Neville Brothers, "Family Groove," A&M. The Nevilles hit the comfort zone in giving the New Orleans R&B tradition the fully contemporary spin the group has been aiming for since 1989's "Yellow Moon." All the family trademarks--the wickedly funky title track, a potent version of Steve Miller's "Fly Like an Eagle," Aaron's pop-soul balladry, socially conscious lyrics--finally sound like they flow from a single source, not separate elements grafted together.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If New Orleans ever were to sink into the sea--a likelihood if its residents don't stop eating so much--scientists probably could re-create the whole place by cloning a DNA sample scraped off the Neville Brothers. The Crescent City has had many fine musical emissaries, from Louis Armstrong up through little Harry Connick Jr., but no one so embodies its qualities as the Nevilles do.
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