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April 10, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
The way musical director Jack Elliot looks at it, eight years of financial hardship for his New American Orchestra is enough. The 60-piece assemblage of select studio and jazz musicians has been drawing mostly modest audiences to its performances at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion since its inception in 1979. Elliot hopes that will change when the orchestra embarks on its 1987 season Sunday at UCLA's Wadsworth Theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
What's new? Is the Foundation for New American Music new? How new is the New American Orchestra, whose music it presents? Picture this grand finale at the orchestra's 11th-anniversary concert, Saturday evening at Royce Hall. The spotlight is not on the orchestra but on four singers, seated on high stools stage left. They sing a medley of songs written decades ago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
The New American Orchestra celebrated its seventh anniversary Friday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion with a program befitting the group's designed lack of musical direction. Drawing on its members' symphonic, jazz and pop backgrounds, the New American Orchestra, under the skillful direction of Jack Elliott, performed from all three of the musical genres and featured guest artists Maureen McGovern, Stan Getz and Ray Charles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The problems involved in keeping a big band together have plagued musicians ever since the swing era ended. Where do you find jobs for 16 men? Whom do you commission to write for them and how do you pay them? Where can you travel, given the huge cost of plane fares? How do you keep the ensemble racially integrated?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | A. JAMES LISKA
Are two concerts enough to determine that the New American Orchestra's move from the Music Center to the Wadsworth Theater was good for the 9-year-old ensemble's musical health? "We got rid of the 'edifice' complex," said a laughing Jack Elliott, co-founder and conductor of the 60-member orchestra. Indeed, if the Music Center--and its high prices--posed any intimidations to the organization or its patrons, they seemed to have been quelled by the move to the Westside.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
The New American Orchestra needs help. Now into its second decade (the first concert was in April, 1979, at the Chandler Pavilion), it continues to present works that are ambitious and at times adventurous, yet the many empty seats Sunday at Royce Hall showed that it has trouble nowadays filling a large auditorium even with a free-admission policy. Perhaps some listeners stayed home, since the orchestral segment was aired on KKGO.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The problems involved in keeping a big band together have plagued musicians ever since the swing era ended. Where do you find jobs for 16 men? Whom do you commission to write for them and how do you pay them? Where can you travel, given the huge cost of plane fares? How do you keep the ensemble racially integrated?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986
Bernheimer's criticism of Domingo 's microphone technique while ignoring his obvious musicianship was petty, trivial and completely uncalled for. As violinist in the orchestra that accompanied Domingo at the Aug. 12 benefit concert for the homeless in Mexico City, I can attest to the fact that his large voice requires no amplification to project in a large hall. Perhaps Bernheimer didn't notice that every single instrument in the New American Orchestra had a microphone attached to it and was amplified.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Duke Ellington, who died on May 24, 1974, would have been 90 this Saturday and in memory of his birthday, numerous celebrations are scheduled that day around the Southland. KUSC-FM (91.5) interrupts its usual 24-hour classical format to present "My Sparkling Parade," a 90-minute audio portrait of the great composer-bandleader-pianist. Airing at 6 p.m., the program includes interviews with Los Angeles Philharmonic Music Director Andre Previn, composer-author Gunther Schuller and Ellington collaborator Maurice Peress.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1987 | KENNETH HERMAN, A new weekly column about people and events in the arts community, compiled by The Times' arts writers in San Diego
Violist Karen Sanders, just appointed San Diego Symphony's acting principal viola, is also the orchestra's youngest member. The 21-year-old musician returned to the city after two years' study at Philadelphia's noted Curtiss Institute of Music and performing last season with the New American Chamber Orchestra in Detroit. A San Diego native, Sanders graduated from O'Farrell High's School of Performing Arts. Her early orchestral training was with the local Civic Youth Orchestra under Marlin Owen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
The New American Orchestra needs help. Now into its second decade (the first concert was in April, 1979, at the Chandler Pavilion), it continues to present works that are ambitious and at times adventurous, yet the many empty seats Sunday at Royce Hall showed that it has trouble nowadays filling a large auditorium even with a free-admission policy. Perhaps some listeners stayed home, since the orchestral segment was aired on KKGO.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Duke Ellington, who died on May 24, 1974, would have been 90 this Saturday and in memory of his birthday, numerous celebrations are scheduled that day around the Southland. KUSC-FM (91.5) interrupts its usual 24-hour classical format to present "My Sparkling Parade," a 90-minute audio portrait of the great composer-bandleader-pianist. Airing at 6 p.m., the program includes interviews with Los Angeles Philharmonic Music Director Andre Previn, composer-author Gunther Schuller and Ellington collaborator Maurice Peress.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | A. JAMES LISKA
Are two concerts enough to determine that the New American Orchestra's move from the Music Center to the Wadsworth Theater was good for the 9-year-old ensemble's musical health? "We got rid of the 'edifice' complex," said a laughing Jack Elliott, co-founder and conductor of the 60-member orchestra. Indeed, if the Music Center--and its high prices--posed any intimidations to the organization or its patrons, they seemed to have been quelled by the move to the Westside.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
The way musical director Jack Elliot looks at it, eight years of financial hardship for his New American Orchestra is enough. The 60-piece assemblage of select studio and jazz musicians has been drawing mostly modest audiences to its performances at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion since its inception in 1979. Elliot hopes that will change when the orchestra embarks on its 1987 season Sunday at UCLA's Wadsworth Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986
Bernheimer's criticism of Domingo 's microphone technique while ignoring his obvious musicianship was petty, trivial and completely uncalled for. As violinist in the orchestra that accompanied Domingo at the Aug. 12 benefit concert for the homeless in Mexico City, I can attest to the fact that his large voice requires no amplification to project in a large hall. Perhaps Bernheimer didn't notice that every single instrument in the New American Orchestra had a microphone attached to it and was amplified.
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