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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990
So Norman Lear has decided to do his own brand of evangelism ("Divining the New Lear" by Judith Michaelson, Dec. 2), sort of a cosmic mix of comedy and God. We're all waiting to see whose "god" Lear will choose to ridicule. I think we Bible-believing Christians have a good idea which one it will be. DEBRA PEEPLEZ Inglewood
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990
I'm really glad that Norman Lear will be writing for television once again. The theme of spirituality for his series is very timely. Since his material needs are more than met, why doesn't Lear devote the proceeds from "Sunday Dinner" to helping the homeless? He alone could be the catalyst for solving this horrible problem. RAND MOORHEAD Salt Lake City
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
Norman's back. These past few months, at places like Sunset-Gower Studios in Hollywood, Burbank and the valet-parking line of the Beverly-Wilshire Hotel--where actor Robert Loggia, star of Norman Lear's newest TV series, was retrieving his car--the phrase has assumed the tone of mantra: Norman's back. Lear is said to be thriving, he's smiling a different smile, he's revved up again.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
Norman's back. These past few months, at places like Sunset-Gower Studios in Hollywood, Burbank and the valet-parking line of the Beverly-Wilshire Hotel--where actor Robert Loggia, star of Norman Lear's newest TV series, was retrieving his car--the phrase has assumed the tone of mantra: Norman's back. Lear is said to be thriving, he's smiling a different smile, he's revved up again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Weiskopf, a comedy writer who penned award-winning scripts for "I Love Lucy," "Maude" and "All in the Family," has died. He was 86. Weiskopf died Tuesday in Los Angeles, said his longtime writing partner, Robert A. Schiller. Active until a decade ago, Weiskopf and Schiller, often called "the Bobs," earned Emmys for "The Flip Wilson Show" in 1971 and an episode of "All in the Family" titled "Cousin Liz" in 1978.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1990 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to compete in the crowded late-night TV landscape, CBS on Thursday announced a late-night lineup that will combine a new comedy from Norman Lear with five new action adventure series that will air over five different nights of the week. CBS executives said the new schedule will provide effective counter-programming to the talk show format that dominates late-night TV.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's Sunday. Ben Benedict, a 56-year-old widower, has brought his 30-year-old fiancee, TT, home to meet his three grown children, sister and granddaughter. Only they don't know she's his fiancee. And he doesn't know that she's such a devout Christian that she regularly prays in private, addressing God as "Her" or "Him" or, on this day, "Chief." "Chief, you gotta minute?" she begins, praying that Ben's family will like her.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2004 | Robert Hilburn
Two album of the year candidates highlight this edition of Calendar's guide to keeping up with the best in pop music on an album budget of $50 per month. -- Robert Hilburn * May PJ Harvey's "Uh Huh Her" (Island) If this were the splendid English singer-songwriter's debut, she would probably be accused of jumping on the White Stripes' lo-fi, blues-rock bandwagon, but Harvey was making records with those stark, intense emotional shades long before Jack and Meg White.
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