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New Line Cinema Corp

ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2002 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Alexander Payne is a final-cut director, which means that when he showed New Line Cinema his new Jack Nicholson film, "About Schmidt," it was essentially the movie he wanted released. But rather than defer to the Oscar-nominated "Election" filmmaker, New Line invoked a rarely exercised contract clause that allowed the studio to enter the editing room, re-cut the film and test its own version on an audience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of bitter squabbling and name-calling, New Line Cinema and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer are on the verge of an accord that would allow New Line to resume the use of the title "Austin Powers in Goldmember" on this summer's third installment of the popular James Bond parody. The negotiations were continuing Monday, and sources from both studios say an agreement could be reached in the next day or two. The terms being discussed have not been released.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Bob Shaye didn't know it at the time, but when he met with director Peter Jackson to discuss making "Lord of the Rings," the New Line Cinema founder was the filmmaker's last hope. For several years, the quirky New Zealand writer-director had been working on the project of a lifetime, trying to find a way to turn the wondrously mythic saga of J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" into a two-part series of films.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Oh, the irony: When I drove up to Michael De Luca's house high in the Hollywood Hills the other day, a motorcycle cop was in his driveway, directing traffic past a scrum of equipment trucks and a honey wagon--someone was making a movie next door. After spending his entire 16-year movie-business career at New Line Cinema, it's De Luca who's now just a spectator.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2000 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly everyone works long hours in the movie business, but the lights really burn late at night at New Line Cinema, which has quietly become Hollywood's in-house film school. It's almost impossible to walk through the studio's Robertson Boulevard offices without bumping into someone who has sold a movie while moonlighting from his or her day job.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Line Cinema's recent boxing drama "Price of Glory" suffered a TKO the minute it stepped into the ring last Friday. In its first weekend, the $12-million picture took in only $1.5 million at the box office, finishing out of the Top 10. With such a weak opening, it is unlikely the movie will survive in wide release much longer. Its apparent failure is disappointing because the film initially showed promise.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2000 | MATT COLTRIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High school students are blown out of a burning airplane. A young man's head rolls--and not as the result of corporate downsizing. A woman displays an alarming lack of care with her kitchen cutlery. "Final Destination," opening Friday, delivers a frightening variety of mechanical and visual effects--many quite realistic and unsettling--without the movie costing an arm and a leg.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Mike Myers won't make a George Lucas-sized killing on his hot summer movie, but he stands to shag $20 million or more from his "Austin Powers" blockbuster sequel. And because the movie is such a phenomenal hit after just one week in release, Myers will almost assuredly make that kind of money as an upfront fee on the franchise's next installment. That would put him in the company of Hollywood's highest-paid stars, among them Leonardo DiCaprio, Jim Carrey, Tom Cruise, Tom Hanks and Will Smith.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER and MARK SAYLOR
New Line Cinema has come a long way, baby, since its founding 32 years ago by Greenwich Village renegade Robert Shaye and its first release, the reissue of the 1936 film "Reefer Madness," became a cult classic on college campuses. Unlike many independent movie companies that blew themselves up in the 1980s by overextending and overspending, New Line has survived by holding down costs, minimizing risk and making movies that don't depend on big stars and big budgets.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Motion Picture Assn. of America announced last year that Latinos had surpassed African Americans as the second largest group of movie ticket-buyers in the U.S., it gave Latino filmmakers added leverage in their ongoing efforts to have Hollywood make more films aimed at the burgeoning audience. And now there is an initial indication that the strategy is paying off.
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