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New Line Cinema Corp

BUSINESS
March 3, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Time Warner Inc.'s New Line Cinema was sued by director Peter Jackson's production company over claims that New Line failed to properly distribute profit from the first movie in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy. Jackson's Wingnut Films Ltd.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 2005 | Claudia Eller and Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writers
New Line Cinema Corp.'s bet on its screen adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy hit big, amassing close to $3 billion at the box office worldwide. The final installment won a slew of Oscars, including best picture and best director. Now the studio is ready to roll the dice on another trilogy, the far less well-known "His Dark Materials," by British author Philip Pullman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2004 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
New Line Cinema doesn't mind taking risks, and the studio has prospered through its wagers on everything from "The Lord of the Rings" to "About Schmidt." But rarely does New Line take the kind of flier its new film "Birth" represents. The reincarnation drama, about a woman, played by Nicole Kidman, who comes to believe that her late husband has been reincarnated as a 10-year-old boy, was hardly expensive, but its artistic ambitions were unusually difficult to fulfill.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
It must've been ages ago -- OK, maybe it was 1999 -- when I was at New Line, watching a pair of perky young screenwriters pitch then-New Line production chief Michael De Luca on their idea for a smack-talking showdown between horror moviedom's two titans of evil, Freddy Krueger from "Nightmare on Elm Street" and Jason Voorhees from "Friday the 13th."
BUSINESS
February 26, 2003 | James Bates
Mark Ordesky was promoted to the new post of executive vice president and chief operating officer of New Line Productions, overseeing the day-to-day operations of the film company's production staff. The promotion is a reward for Ordesky's championing of the lucrative "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, directed by Peter Jackson, which has grossed $1.7 billion worldwide. The final installment is set to be released this year. Ordesky was the executive producer for all three films.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2002 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Alexander Payne is a final-cut director, which means that when he showed New Line Cinema his new Jack Nicholson film, "About Schmidt," it was essentially the movie he wanted released. But rather than defer to the Oscar-nominated "Election" filmmaker, New Line invoked a rarely exercised contract clause that allowed the studio to enter the editing room, re-cut the film and test its own version on an audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of bitter squabbling and name-calling, New Line Cinema and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer are on the verge of an accord that would allow New Line to resume the use of the title "Austin Powers in Goldmember" on this summer's third installment of the popular James Bond parody. The negotiations were continuing Monday, and sources from both studios say an agreement could be reached in the next day or two. The terms being discussed have not been released.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2002 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Oscar nomination morning at New Line Cinema's Los Angeles headquarters on Robertson Boulevard. The dawn has brought the company 13 nominations for the fantasy blockbuster "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," including the company's first for best picture (although its art-house division Fine Line Features picked up a best picture nod for 1996's "Shine").
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Bob Shaye didn't know it at the time, but when he met with director Peter Jackson to discuss making "Lord of the Rings," the New Line Cinema founder was the filmmaker's last hope. For several years, the quirky New Zealand writer-director had been working on the project of a lifetime, trying to find a way to turn the wondrously mythic saga of J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" into a two-part series of films.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge ruled that New Line Cinema Corp. may not release a movie under the name "Diablo" because the trademark is held by Blizzard Entertainment, an Irvine-based computer game maker that has marketed a series of games under the name. Blizzard officials say they plan to produce their own motion picture and want to avoid "consumer confusion." New Line officials declined to comment Tuesday on the preliminary injunction granted last week by U.S.
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