Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNew Mexico History
IN THE NEWS

New Mexico History

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998 | Associated Press
Four hundred years ago, on a mission to evangelize and baptize America's Indians, eight Franciscan friars trekked through the desert with Spanish explorers. Although most people think Christianity came to America on the Mayflower, the first permanent Catholic settlers actually arrived earlier, in 1598, in what is now New Mexico, establishing a tiny enclave about 80 miles from Albuquerque.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 30, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
The Whitewater-Baldy Complex fire in New Mexico hasn't just broken the record for the largest blaze in state history, it's shattered it. An infrared reading about midnight Tuesday measured the fire at 170,272 acres, leaving last year's 156,593-acre Las Conchas fire in the dust. That acreage roughly translates to 269 square miles, more than half the size of city of Los Angeles. “The fire seems to be growing in all directions,” fire information officer Gerry Perry told the Los Angeles Times.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
May 30, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
The Whitewater-Baldy Complex fire in New Mexico hasn't just broken the record for the largest blaze in state history, it's shattered it. An infrared reading about midnight Tuesday measured the fire at 170,272 acres, leaving last year's 156,593-acre Las Conchas fire in the dust. That acreage roughly translates to 269 square miles, more than half the size of city of Los Angeles. “The fire seems to be growing in all directions,” fire information officer Gerry Perry told the Los Angeles Times.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | By Christopher Reynolds, Times staff writer
"The most interesting part about [El Morro] is the signatures of all the people going through there," reader Laura LaCour-Johnson, a native of Albuquerque, write in her nominating letter. "The best time to go is just before winter, when it's chilly but you can still go up. If it has just snowed, it's really, really nice. " THE SETTING El Morro National Monument , a much-carved bluff in the high desert of western New Mexico. THE VIBE Anasazi, with one layer of Spanish colonialism and another of American Manifest Destiny, all seen through the lens of National Park Service stewardship.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | By Christopher Reynolds, Times staff writer
"The most interesting part about [El Morro] is the signatures of all the people going through there," reader Laura LaCour-Johnson, a native of Albuquerque, write in her nominating letter. "The best time to go is just before winter, when it's chilly but you can still go up. If it has just snowed, it's really, really nice. " THE SETTING El Morro National Monument , a much-carved bluff in the high desert of western New Mexico. THE VIBE Anasazi, with one layer of Spanish colonialism and another of American Manifest Destiny, all seen through the lens of National Park Service stewardship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997 | OLLIE REED JR., ALBUQUERQUE TRIBUNE
Janaloo Hill did not go up the slope to her parents' graves for the two weeks after the fire. Too early to visit, the pain too fresh, the guilt too intense. It was nobody's fault. Still, she couldn't shake the feeling that she had let her parents down. How could she climb that slope and tell her mother and father that a rich chunk of the New Mexico history they had put so much of their lives into preserving--that she had put so much of her own life into preserving--was gone?
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To Hispanics, he was a gutsy trailblazer who bravely settled a New World. To American Indians, he was a ruthless colonialist who cut off the feet of their ancestors. Now the city's plans to celebrate the Spanish conquistador Juan de Onate's arrival in New Mexico 400 years ago have hit a snag: The guest of honor isn't welcome by all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | MATT MYGATT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Blackened skeletons of ponderosa pines stand guard over knee-high green grass and wildflowers poking up around volcanic stones. The stones--more than a dozen in pink, brown and gray--are in two parallel lines next to a gully that cradles small stagnant pools of water from recent rainfall.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | William Kahrl, Kahrl is the editor of "The California Water Atlas" (William Kaufmann Inc.) and author of " Water and Power " (University of California Press). and
Despite the extraordinary physical beauty of its setting, the story that Ira Clark has to tell in this massively detailed history of New Mexico is largely one of communities struggling to overcome the economic poverty of their land and water resources. It's a curiously shut-ended kind of struggle--a process of self-cannibalization really.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | SCOTT McCARTNEY, Associated Press
The answer that has eluded so many for so long lies 400 feet down below, in the bowels of a rocky peak littered with creosote trees, rattlesnakes and bullet-pocked military targets. On top, rusted steel bars bolted to weathered timbers guard the four-foot-square opening to the secret of Victorio Peak. Underneath, buried by time and temptation, lies either 100 tons of gold bars worth perhaps $1.2 billion, or one of the wildest hoaxes of the Wild West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | MATT MYGATT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Blackened skeletons of ponderosa pines stand guard over knee-high green grass and wildflowers poking up around volcanic stones. The stones--more than a dozen in pink, brown and gray--are in two parallel lines next to a gully that cradles small stagnant pools of water from recent rainfall.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To Hispanics, he was a gutsy trailblazer who bravely settled a New World. To American Indians, he was a ruthless colonialist who cut off the feet of their ancestors. Now the city's plans to celebrate the Spanish conquistador Juan de Onate's arrival in New Mexico 400 years ago have hit a snag: The guest of honor isn't welcome by all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998 | Associated Press
Four hundred years ago, on a mission to evangelize and baptize America's Indians, eight Franciscan friars trekked through the desert with Spanish explorers. Although most people think Christianity came to America on the Mayflower, the first permanent Catholic settlers actually arrived earlier, in 1598, in what is now New Mexico, establishing a tiny enclave about 80 miles from Albuquerque.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997 | OLLIE REED JR., ALBUQUERQUE TRIBUNE
Janaloo Hill did not go up the slope to her parents' graves for the two weeks after the fire. Too early to visit, the pain too fresh, the guilt too intense. It was nobody's fault. Still, she couldn't shake the feeling that she had let her parents down. How could she climb that slope and tell her mother and father that a rich chunk of the New Mexico history they had put so much of their lives into preserving--that she had put so much of her own life into preserving--was gone?
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | William Kahrl, Kahrl is the editor of "The California Water Atlas" (William Kaufmann Inc.) and author of " Water and Power " (University of California Press). and
Despite the extraordinary physical beauty of its setting, the story that Ira Clark has to tell in this massively detailed history of New Mexico is largely one of communities struggling to overcome the economic poverty of their land and water resources. It's a curiously shut-ended kind of struggle--a process of self-cannibalization really.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Skeen, the blunt-talking sheep rancher who often irked environmentalists by championing agrarian causes during his 22 years in Congress, died Sunday night after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 76. New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, a Democrat who had served in Congress with -- and often against -- Republican Skeen, called him "a vintage New Mexican." "He loved the land and represented New Mexico's rural lifestyle with great skill," Richardson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2010
'A Nightmare in Las Cruces' One of the worst crimes in New Mexico history — an early 1990 robbery and execution-style mass murder at a Las Cruces bowling alley — remains unsolved 20 years later. But it's the hope of filmmaker Charlie Minn that his self-distributed documentary, "A Nightmare in Las Cruces," might breathe new life into this stone-cold case. Whatever the outcome, Minn has done a creditable job recounting the details of this heinous event and probing its haunting aftermath.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|