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New Motor Vehicle Board

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AUTOS
April 28, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Not too many government agencies allow private industry to overrule their regulatory decisions, which is how consumer advocates describe California's system for overseeing new-car dealers. But change may be on the way as reforms wind through the California Senate, seeking to send an important message to the industry about the importance of consumer protection. Surveys by the Consumer Federation of America show that car buying is the greatest single source of consumer dissatisfaction.
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BUSINESS
January 20, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik
One of the more peculiar manifestations of California car culture isn't the grip exerted on our imagination by the automobile; it's the grip exerted on our economy by the automobile dealer. What else could explain the extraordinary authority of an entity known as the state New Motor Vehicle Board? The board, which dates to 1967, holds the power to overrule any disciplinary action taken by the Department of Motor Vehicles against dealers of new cars.
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BUSINESS
January 20, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik
One of the more peculiar manifestations of California car culture isn't the grip exerted on our imagination by the automobile; it's the grip exerted on our economy by the automobile dealer. What else could explain the extraordinary authority of an entity known as the state New Motor Vehicle Board? The board, which dates to 1967, holds the power to overrule any disciplinary action taken by the Department of Motor Vehicles against dealers of new cars.
AUTOS
April 28, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Not too many government agencies allow private industry to overrule their regulatory decisions, which is how consumer advocates describe California's system for overseeing new-car dealers. But change may be on the way as reforms wind through the California Senate, seeking to send an important message to the industry about the importance of consumer protection. Surveys by the Consumer Federation of America show that car buying is the greatest single source of consumer dissatisfaction.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: I have repeatedly had to return my new Chevrolet to the dealer for different repairs. The engine computer went out once, stranding me. Since then, the engine doesn't seem to run right. The power door locks would not work. And just recently, the automatic transmission seems to be making a loud clunk every time it shifts. I am worried I have a lemon. I have heard there is something called a lemon law. What is it and how do I use it?--N.G. Answer: The vast majority of problems on new cars, even difficult ones that defy the first repair attempt, can be solved without invoking lemon laws, but occasionally a car is so badly built that a motorist has no alternative but to do legal battle with the manufacturer.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: I purchased a Mazda RX-7 from a new-car dealer in March. It was sold to me as a new car, and I paid above the sticker price. Since then, I learned the car was sold a month earlier to a man who drove it 400 miles. (I have his name, address and phone number.) I believe the factory warranty registration may still be in the previous owner's name. Although I knew the mileage at the time of the purchase, I was not told the car was previously owned.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chrysler Corp., which is being punished for selling "lemons" in California, appealed a state decree that would ban it from selling cars and trucks in the state for 45 days. The state, which was the first to ban a car maker for selling defective vehicles, also wants to prevent Detroit-based Chrysler from selling used cars for three years.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
If your car has broken down just after the standard warranty expires and the dealer says he can fix it under a goodwill adjustment, it's your lucky day in the shop. But are the dealership and the manufacturer actually executing a so-called secret warranty that involves a defective product without disclosing it?
NEWS
August 23, 1988 | MICHAEL MILSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian on Monday officially removed a Glendora car dealer, who had been heavily disciplined by the Department of Motor Vehicles, from a state board with the power to overrule DMV disciplinary actions. Deukmejian's office acknowledged to The Times last week that in February the governor had reappointed Eminiano (Jun) Reodica to the New Motor Vehicle Board despite knowing that the DMV had fined Reodica $100,000 for hundreds of violations.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1997 | From Reuters
The state New Motor Vehicle Board on Wednesday reversed a decision by the Department of Motor Vehicles to slap Chrysler Corp. with a 45-day suspension of its business license for violations of the state's "lemon law." The DMV said in October that Chrysler should be banned from supplying new vehicles to dealers for 45 days.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: I have repeatedly had to return my new Chevrolet to the dealer for different repairs. The engine computer went out once, stranding me. Since then, the engine doesn't seem to run right. The power door locks would not work. And just recently, the automatic transmission seems to be making a loud clunk every time it shifts. I am worried I have a lemon. I have heard there is something called a lemon law. What is it and how do I use it?--N.G. Answer: The vast majority of problems on new cars, even difficult ones that defy the first repair attempt, can be solved without invoking lemon laws, but occasionally a car is so badly built that a motorist has no alternative but to do legal battle with the manufacturer.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: I purchased a Mazda RX-7 from a new-car dealer in March. It was sold to me as a new car, and I paid above the sticker price. Since then, I learned the car was sold a month earlier to a man who drove it 400 miles. (I have his name, address and phone number.) I believe the factory warranty registration may still be in the previous owner's name. Although I knew the mileage at the time of the purchase, I was not told the car was previously owned.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
California's new secret warranty act, intended to provide added protection for automobile owners, has been in effect since January, but the results so far have been less than impressive. Few consumers understand the law--and even the agency administering the law in Sacramento appears to be confused about exactly what legislators intended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1988 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
Problems appeared to mount Thursday for Eminiano (Jun) Reodica, the Glendale auto dealer appointed by Gov. George Deukmejian to the board that oversees the Department of Motor Vehicles. Two officials of the board sought to widen the scope of investigations into Reodica's activities. At a news conference, Sam W.
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