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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When Stephen King published his third novel, "The Shining," in 1977, he was a writer with a lot on his mind. Initially, he told The Times in 1998, he conceived of the book as "a Shakespearean tragedy, a kind of inside-out 'King Lear,' where Lear is this young guy who has a son instead of daughters. " He even went so far as to divide the first draft into acts and scenes. Make of this what you will, but it suggests that King has always had more at stake than merely to frighten us, that he wants to get at the big themes: love, loss, loyalty, what happens between parents and their kids.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Standing outside a bookstore on 8th Street a decade ago, novelist Susan Straight looked across the street and saw a vision of Los Angeles loneliness. Men clustered around a black door, surrounded by a wall of black tile. They filled the dark, narrow space inside, reeking of cheap liquor and hurt. "It was just the saddest place I'd ever seen," Straight told me as we stood outside the Golden Gopher bar this week. "There was this lingering melancholy all around this block. You could just smell the desperation of all these men. " These days the Golden Gopher is a hip hangout whose patrons include guys in suits.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Back to Blood A Novel Tom Wolfe Little, Brown: 704 pp., $30 About a quarter of the way through Tom Wolfe's new novel, "Back to Blood," pornography addiction specialist Dr. Norman Lewis waits with his nurse (and mistress) Magdelena Otero to be interviewed by a "60 Minutes" crew. Norman is delirious at the prospect of his star turn - so much so that he becomes a bit, er, overstimulated. "' Now - while they're at the door!' " he grunts at Magdalena, who responds, " 'No, Norman!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Meyer Lansky is one of the gravitational centers of Zachary Lazar's new novel, "I Pity the Poor Immigrant" (Little, Brown and Company: 256 pp., $25). Not so much the dapper, "Boardwalk Empire"-era gangster as Lansky in 1972 in Israel, seeking to retire there under the country's Law of Return. It's hardly the most celebrated era in Lansky's life, but Lazar was going for something other than the obvious. "The initial idea of this book was to put Meyer Lansky in the same room as King David from the Bible," Lazar said via Skype from his home office in New Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
With "The Da Vinci Code" author Dan Brown's news Tuesday morning that he would be releasing a new Robert Langdon adventure in May, we thought it wise to check in with the movie prospects for Brown's last Langdon tale, "The Lost Symbol," which resided on the New York Times hard-cover fiction bestseller list for 29 weeks and has 30 million copies in print worldwide. Sony's Columbia Pictures, which released the previous two films, "The DaVinci Code" and "Angels and Demons," owns the option to all of Brown's future projects involving Langdon, including "The Lost Symbol" and the upcoming "Inferno.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Friends are dress shopping in the novel "Americanah"; when they get to the register, the cashier asks which of two saleswomen helped them, but they're not sure. She lists numerous physical characteristics to identify the salesperson before giving up. "Why didn't she just ask 'Was it the black girl or the white girl?'" the main character, Ifemelu, exclaims after they leave. "Because this is America," her friend tells her. "You're supposed to pretend that you don't notice certain things.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"New York is so over," says Bret Easton Ellis, sitting behind the glass-topped desk in his home office. "Who cares about New York? L.A. is where it's at right now." Outside the windows of his high-rise, hillside apartment, Los Angeles appears serene, nothing but green treetops, a few glittery skyscrapers and a hazy horizon. From here, there is little evidence of the dead-eyed rich kids and existential dread of a city "afraid to merge," as Ellis wrote in "Less Than Zero." Published in 1985, the book was heralded as a cultural touchstone by baby boomers looking to understand what was then called the MTV generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010 | By Carmela Ciuraru, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The clash between science and faith is a subject that bestselling author Sena Jeter Naslund returns to in her new novel "Adam & Eve," but, unlike her previous books "Ahab's Wife" and "Abundance," her latest demands a suspension of disbelief that is difficult to provide. In the year 2017, a renowned astrophysicist named Thom Bergmann is murdered shortly after having made a breakthrough discovery: irrefutable proof of extraterrestrial life. He tells no one but his wife, Lucy, entrusting her with the evidence on a computer flash drive in case something should happen to him. He's aware that religious fundamentalists consider his research into "life beyond the stars" blasphemous and threatening, and would do anything to stop him. His murder is made to look like a freak accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tom Wolfe is working on a new novel and will release it through a new publisher, ending a 40-year run with Farrar, Straus & Giroux and signing with Little, Brown & Co. "The opportunity to work with the American master Tom Wolfe is the kind of thrill and challenge that people entering book publishing dream of," Little, Brown publisher Michael Pietsch said Wednesday. One of the original "New Journalists" of the 1960s, the 76-year-old Wolfe is known for such bestselling novels as "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full" and for such nonfiction classics as "The Right Stuff" and "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test."
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