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New Novel

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2010 | Hector Tobar
Standing outside a bookstore on 8th Street a decade ago, novelist Susan Straight looked across the street and saw a vision of Los Angeles loneliness. Men clustered around a black door, surrounded by a wall of black tile. They filled the dark, narrow space inside, reeking of cheap liquor and hurt. "It was just the saddest place I'd ever seen," Straight told me as we stood outside the Golden Gopher bar this week. "There was this lingering melancholy all around this block. You could just smell the desperation of all these men. " These days the Golden Gopher is a hip hangout whose patrons include guys in suits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's early on a brisk morning in September, and Russell Banks is standing in front of the Marriott Hotel Brooklyn Bridge, smoking his first cigarette of the day. In a few hours, he'll be onstage at the Brooklyn Book Festival, across Adams Street in Borough Hall Plaza, but at the moment he's a little tired - the result of a late night with his friend, novelist Paul Auster, a longtime Brooklynite. Still, at 71, Banks looks fit, hair and beard white and close-cropped, eyes sharp behind a pair of frameless glasses that sit like windows on his face.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Jim Ruland
On a piano keyboard, which mimics the human vocal range, the middle C is the C closest to the center. That's Joseph Skizzen - the protagonist of William H. Gass' long-awaited follow-up to his 1995 masterpiece "The Tunnel" - a middle-of-the-road yet slightly off-center academic who wants nothing but "the chance of an unnoticed life. " But it just might be a stand-in for the author. If Gass' body of work were a keyboard, you'd have his debut novel, "Omensetter's Luck" on one end and of "The Tunnel" at the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Back to Blood A Novel Tom Wolfe Little, Brown: 704 pp., $30 About a quarter of the way through Tom Wolfe's new novel, "Back to Blood," pornography addiction specialist Dr. Norman Lewis waits with his nurse (and mistress) Magdelena Otero to be interviewed by a "60 Minutes" crew. Norman is delirious at the prospect of his star turn - so much so that he becomes a bit, er, overstimulated. "' Now - while they're at the door!' " he grunts at Magdalena, who responds, " 'No, Norman!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Meyer Lansky is one of the gravitational centers of Zachary Lazar's new novel, "I Pity the Poor Immigrant" (Little, Brown and Company: 256 pp., $25). Not so much the dapper, "Boardwalk Empire"-era gangster as Lansky in 1972 in Israel, seeking to retire there under the country's Law of Return. It's hardly the most celebrated era in Lansky's life, but Lazar was going for something other than the obvious. "The initial idea of this book was to put Meyer Lansky in the same room as King David from the Bible," Lazar said via Skype from his home office in New Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
With "The Da Vinci Code" author Dan Brown's news Tuesday morning that he would be releasing a new Robert Langdon adventure in May, we thought it wise to check in with the movie prospects for Brown's last Langdon tale, "The Lost Symbol," which resided on the New York Times hard-cover fiction bestseller list for 29 weeks and has 30 million copies in print worldwide. Sony's Columbia Pictures, which released the previous two films, "The DaVinci Code" and "Angels and Demons," owns the option to all of Brown's future projects involving Langdon, including "The Lost Symbol" and the upcoming "Inferno.
OPINION
September 15, 2010 | By John Kenney
"Jonathan Franzen's new novel, 'Freedom,' like his previous book, 'The Corrections,' is a masterpiece of American fiction.... Like all great novels, 'Freedom' does not just tell an engrossing story. It illuminates, through the steady radiance of its author's profound moral intelligence, the world we thought we knew. " — The New York Times Book Review Once in a generation, or perhaps once every two generations, or twice in one generation, or even something longer than a generation time-wise (be it once or twice)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to Stephen King, I'm partial to the smaller efforts: novellas, short novels, experiments, the quieter, more interior stuff. It's not that I don't like his big books - especially "The Shining," which remains the scariest thing I've ever read, and the 1996 novel "Desperation," an overarching consideration of sin and sacrifice and redemption, set in a Nevada mining town. Still, what makes King resonate for me is the detail work, the way he can get inside the most mundane situation and animate it, revealing in the process something of how we live.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tom Wolfe is working on a new novel and will release it through a new publisher, ending a 40-year run with Farrar, Straus & Giroux and signing with Little, Brown & Co. "The opportunity to work with the American master Tom Wolfe is the kind of thrill and challenge that people entering book publishing dream of," Little, Brown publisher Michael Pietsch said Wednesday. One of the original "New Journalists" of the 1960s, the 76-year-old Wolfe is known for such bestselling novels as "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full" and for such nonfiction classics as "The Right Stuff" and "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test."
BOOKS
August 6, 1989
We are delighted with the excellent review by Charles Champlin of our new novel, "Finders Keepers" (Book Review, July 16), but we would like to clear up a misconception: Barbara Nickolae is not one person writing under two bylines, as the McGraw-Hill book jacket suggests. She is, in fact, two people: Barbara Pronin of West Covina (author of "Syndrome") and Nickolae Gerstner of Manhattan Beach (author of "Dark Veil"). BARBARA PRONIN and NICKOLAE GERSTNER WEST COVINA
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