Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNew Orleans La
IN THE NEWS

New Orleans La

NATIONAL
December 21, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
After protesters skirmished with police inside and outside New Orleans City Hall on Thursday, the City Council voted unanimously to approve a federal plan to demolish a vast swath of public housing. The fate of the 4,500 public housing units has become a flash point as this city struggles to piece itself back together after Hurricane Katrina damaged more than 134,000 homes, many of them in poor, mostly black neighborhoods.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
December 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Protesters wielding bullhorns and shouting "housing is a human right!" stopped demolition at a large public housing complex in New Orleans. More than 30 protesters blocked an excavator from entering the fenced-off area of the B.W. Cooper complex. It was the first of what likely will be many standoffs between protesters and demolition crews that are tearing down hundreds of buildings so they can be replaced with mixed-income housing.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The police superintendent of New Orleans defended his decision to fire an officer who was videotaped beating a man in the French Quarter, even though the ex-officer was cleared of criminal charges. The fired officer, Robert Evangelist, wants to return to his old job with back pay. But Supt. Warren Riley said during a hearing in Evangelist's appeal that the officer was fired because he violated department policy. A ruling in the case is expected in a few months.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Protesters angry about the pending demolition of more than 4,000 public housing units stormed a City Council meeting Thursday in a confrontation that ended with a prominent civil rights lawyer being hauled off in handcuffs. Thursday's fracas was a taste of what's likely to come as former residents of the aging, neglected buildings and their advocates seek to stop demolitions that could begin as soon as Dec. 15 in a city that faces an acute housing shortage. The U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2007 | TINA DAUNT
IN Hollywood, causes tend to divide into the popular and the deeply personal. You usually can recognize the difference because the former come from the pages of next month's glossy magazines and the latter right from the heart. For all the time he spends on the tabloids' covers, for example, Brad Pitt actually is pretty much a homebody, and his activism grows out of the years he's spent exploring and understanding the role domestic architecture plays in individual lives.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A former New Orleans City Council member who prosecutors said reneged on a plea bargain to cooperate in a corruption probe was sentenced to a little over three years in federal prison for taking a $15,000 bribe. Oliver Thomas, once considered a shining light on the city's political scene and a potential future mayor, pleaded guilty Aug. 13.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Reversing a decision that some found bureaucratically absurd, the Federal Emergency Management Agency granted $99,766 to a New Orleans aquarium that saved taxpayers a bundle by catching replacements for the fish it lost to Hurricane Katrina. FEMA had said that the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas needed to buy the fish from commercial vendors, a method the agency said would cost $616,849 but would comply with disaster aid laws.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Dozens of homeless people living in pup tents in the shadow of City Hall packed up Wednesday and moved into hotel rooms with the help of a nonprofit group, while about 200 others remained in the camp. The colony in Duncan Plaza has grown in the last few months with people who said a tent is the only affordable housing they could find since Hurricane Katrina, which has caused the homeless population to skyrocket.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2007 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Louisiana and New Orleans leaders agreed Tuesday to help the New Orleans district attorney pay a costly racial discrimination judgment incurred after the office's embattled former head fired 35 white workers and one Latino and replaced them with African Americans. The $3.4-million judgment stemmed from the actions of former Orleans Parish Dist. Atty. Eddie Jordan, the first African American elected to the position.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Amid a Carnival-like atmosphere, streetcars began rolling past the historic mansions of New Orlean's Garden District for the first time since Hurricane Katrina halted the St. Charles Avenue line more than two years ago. Though only about half of the line has been reopened, many see the return of the 1920s-era green cars as a sign of progress in the city's recovery and a morale booster.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|