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November 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Dozens of homeless people living in pup tents in the shadow of City Hall packed up Wednesday and moved into hotel rooms with the help of a nonprofit group, while about 200 others remained in the camp. The colony in Duncan Plaza has grown in the last few months with people who said a tent is the only affordable housing they could find since Hurricane Katrina, which has caused the homeless population to skyrocket.
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NATIONAL
November 21, 2007 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Louisiana and New Orleans leaders agreed Tuesday to help the New Orleans district attorney pay a costly racial discrimination judgment incurred after the office's embattled former head fired 35 white workers and one Latino and replaced them with African Americans. The $3.4-million judgment stemmed from the actions of former Orleans Parish Dist. Atty. Eddie Jordan, the first African American elected to the position.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A former councilwoman won an at-large seat on the New Orleans City Council, creating the first white majority in more than two decades. Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson defeated Cynthia Willard-Lewis, who is black, with 53% of the vote. With all votes counted, Clarkson won with 27,740 votes to Willard-Lewis' 24,874. Clarkson, 71, will take a seat vacated when councilman Oliver Thomas, who is black, resigned in August after pleading guilty to a bribery charge.
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November 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Amid a Carnival-like atmosphere, streetcars began rolling past the historic mansions of New Orlean's Garden District for the first time since Hurricane Katrina halted the St. Charles Avenue line more than two years ago. Though only about half of the line has been reopened, many see the return of the 1920s-era green cars as a sign of progress in the city's recovery and a morale booster.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
Beleaguered New Orleans Dist. Atty. Eddie J. Jordan Jr. announced his resignation Tuesday amid growing speculation of a state takeover of his office. Jordan, who will leave office today, could no longer delay paying off a $3.7-million judgment in a civil rights discrimination lawsuit won by his former employees. It is possible that the assets of the district attorney's office will be seized to cover the judgment; the city has said it will not cover the payment.
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October 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin says the state could take over the district attorney's office as early as Monday as the agency faces a multimillion-dollar civil judgment. A federal judge ruled last week that the office's assets could be seized to pay off a $3.65-million judgment pending from a 2005 case in which dozens of white office workers successfully sued Dist. Atty. Eddie Jordan for replacing them with black workers.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
westwego, la. -- Thousands of people paid their respects Friday to popular -- and controversial -- longtime Jefferson Parish Sheriff Harry Lee. After the viewing, his flag-draped casket was escorted from a suburban New Orleans auditorium to the strains of Frank Sinatra's "My Way." Lee, 75, died Monday. He had leukemia.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2007 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
When she stares out her kitchen window here, Sheri Gioe sees Rachel Estopinal, the same neighbor she used to see before, when she lived in St. Bernard Parish. Her sister lives around the corner, just like before. So do her parents, who still fuss around their home studio, dreaming up extravagant costumes of gilded Egyptian pharaohs and pretty Hawaiian princesses for some of New Orleans' most esteemed Mardi Gras krewes.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
An hour after New Orleans officials opened shelters, warned of possible power outages and urged calm ahead of a threatening tropical depression, the system moved inland hundreds of miles away, and forecasters canceled the warning that had authorities on alert. Under partly cloudy, pale-blue skies, some in this city devastated by Hurricane Katrina two years ago wondered if it was a bit much.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2007 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
For many elderly survivors of Hurricane Katrina, life has become a minor-key coda of rubble and ruin, of discomfort and displacement, of strained social services and fear of depredation. About 40,000 of New Orleans' 85,000 elderly have returned since the city flooded two years ago, said Howard Rodgers III, executive director of the New Orleans Council on Aging. The public and private sectors are doing what they can for the elderly, but they are overwhelmed by the need.
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