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New Otani Hotel Garden

NEWS
August 17, 2006 | Jessica Gelt, Special to The Times
WHAT could be more satisfying than grilling raw meat on a hot summer night? How about grilling raw meat on a hot summer night in a halcyon Japanese rooftop garden in downtown L.A.? Toss in a three-piece jazz-lite band called the Sammy Trio and frosty pitchers of Sapporo beer, and you've lined up a laid-back evening of self-indulgence. On a recent Thursday, my brother Jason and I made our way to Little Tokyo's New Otani Hotel in the early twilight hours to enjoy just such a scene.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2007 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Long before Disneyland's nighttime electrical parade, well before the Rose Parade's dazzling flowered creations, even before America itself was established, the good people of a faraway village in Japan first crafted what would become their nation's most famous float. The simple bamboo and paper contraptions created 350 years ago have morphed into colossal visages of fierce samurai illuminated by hundreds of light bulbs.
FOOD
September 27, 1990 | TONI TIPTON
At the New Otani Hotel and Garden in Los Angeles, displaced residents of Tokyo find the comforts of home in a breakfast of traditional Japanese foods selected as much for their variety, shape and color as for their taste. A menu of rice, pickles, fruit, tea and a source of protein--usually eggs, fish, chicken or tofu--is standard. Some restaurant variations include braised vegetables and baked eggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1998 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sedlar's Giant Tamale: John Sedlar, tamale-maker extraordinaire, is at it again. This time he's hosting a tamale dinner at Alto Palato on July 2 featuring ingredients from the Coachella Valley desert, like artichokes, Meejool dates and goat meat. The big treat, however, will be the Mother of All Tamales. Said tamale will check in at more than 6 feet in length and will resemble an overgrown version of the Zacahuil tamale from Vera Cruz, Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2001 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adieu: Citrus, the highly regarded restaurant that Michel Richard opened in 1986, closed its doors March 20. As a focal point for French cuisine, it hosted numerous visiting French chefs at its 6703 Melrose Ave. location, as well turning out memorable Cal-French food. In 1991, Richard was nominated for the James Beard Foundation's award for best chef in California, alongside Joachim Splichal and Wolfgang Puck.
NEWS
November 29, 1986 | PATRICK MOTT
Hotels, according to Haley Powers, a convention sales manager for the Greater Los Angeles Visitor and Convention Bureau, generally are divided into three classes: Luxury, Business (or Corporate) and Budget. Business class, Powers added, means the hotels generally cater to weekday business travelers, but they offer packages for weekend vacationers that are moderately priced by comparison with luxury hotels.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2001
Local rock fans have enjoyed the work of DJ Swamp when he manned the two turntables in Beck's band. Now the musician is on his own with a new album, "Never Is Now." He teams at the Roxy with the acclaimed rap act the Arsonists.* DJ Swamp, with the Arsonists, Homestyle and Super Dank Bros., the Roxy, 9009 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood, 8 p.m. $13.50. (310) 278-9457.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2000 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Filling Those Clogs: Andrew Pastore is the man replacing Sang Yoon as chef at Michael's, Michael McCarty's mostly outdoor Santa Monica restaurant. Yoon left to run a bar called Father's Office, also in Santa Monica. Pastore had been Yoon's sous chef for the last four months; now, he says, he's "trying to compete with everyone else," meaning other chefs. In his new lunch and dinner menus (just now in effect), Pastore says, he uses as much fresh farmer's market produce as he can.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988 | COLMAN ANDREWS
Great Caesar's Ghost! Since this column aired the plaint from Toby M. Horn of Los Angeles a few weeks ago about the difficulty of finding a good Caesar salad in Southern California--Horn fondly remembers the great Caesars served at the long-defunct House of Murphy on San Vicente and has not since met its match--I have been deluged with recommendations of prime examples of the thing.
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