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March 13, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
When Laura Owens was looking for a studio that could double as an exhibition space for her first show in L.A. since 2003, she considered a variety of buildings. There was an out-of-business Glidden paint shop on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood and a small defunct church on Melrose nearby. But those spaces seemed too specific or loaded architecturally. So it was something of a revelation when she first visited 356 South Mission Road, a 12,000-square-foot stand-alone industrial building in Boyle Heights that had originally housed a lithography studio in the '40s and later served as storage space for pianos - including Liberace's.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Pagel
The lines in Bart Exposito's new paintings at Thomas Solomon Gallery do things the lines in his old paintings didn't: slip away from the shapes they demarcate to float in spaces that are more atmospheric than anything the artist has painted since he began exhibiting 15 years ago. This transformation may have something to do with Exposito's recent move from Los Angeles to Santa Fe and his commute to Albuquerque, where he teaches. Like the landscape he drives through, most of his new works are horizontal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
No Entropic school of art has announced itself as such, but the concept seems to animate a good deal of drawn and painted work of the past decade or more -- images of intense and unpredictable energy, change and disorder. Julie Mehretu might be considered a chief practitioner. The speed and unwieldiness of the information age is one clear source for the vocabulary of charged, global fluidity; a post-9/11 tenor of physical and political uncertainty is likely another. The increasingly volatile collision of nature and culture, in the form of large-scale natural disasters, is yet another catalyst for this type of work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
SALINAS, Calif. - This is a love story involving three hats, one town and the right shade of yellow paint. For decades a trio of giant hat sculptures in a scraggly grass field here had been treated like derelict pieces of playground equipment. Teenagers climbed to the top of what they knew as the "Salinas Hats. " The metal grew rusty and was scarred with gang graffiti. Few seemed to remember that this was "Hat in Three Stages of Landing" by well-known artist Claes Oldenburg and his wife, Coosje van Bruggen.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By David Pagel
Raw talent, restless energy and the sense that something has gone very wrong run every which way in Natalie Frank's new paintings, which turn themselves inside out with such wicked swiftness that it's hard to know up from down, good from bad, us from them. The New York painter is no purist. Titled “The Scene of a Disappearance,” her first solo show in Los Angeles, at Acme, is a big messy mix of people and beasts, their limbs, organs and torsos rearranged in ways that rival Picasso's wildest paintings while capturing the grisliness of crime-scene TV. Frank slices and dices like a food processor, chopping Francis Bacon's ghoulish humans and Lucian Freud's meaty people into bite-size chunks she then cooks into dishes that look delicious from a distance but monstrous up close.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1998
* "Michael Lardizabal: Picturing a Lost Era"--A display of landscape photographs of the Northeast, including "Delaware Canal, Pennsylvania," above, opens Saturday at Jan Kesner Gallery. * "Matthew Brown: On Earth as It Is in Heaven"--New paintings that explore the spiritial in art go on view Saturday at Kohn Turner Gallery. The exhibition continues though July 2. "Culture y Cultura: How the U.S.-Mexican War Shaped the West--The historical exhibition continues through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By David Pagel
At CB1 Gallery, all but one of Daniel Aksten's 10 new paintings in “Support, Edge, Variation” call to mind Minimalism. Their sharp edges, solid colors, geometric compositions and spray-painted surfaces appear to embrace the same rigorous regimentation of that keep-it-simple style from the 1960s. The oddball, “Phanorama (Line, radius),” suggests that Aksten is too promiscuous a painter to be a Minimalist. At 5-by-5 feet, it's the largest work in the show. It's also the most pictorial, with solid bands, overlapping shapes and spindly linear elements evoking a tabletop still life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By David Pagel
Kevin Appel's new paintings are at war with themselves. While that may be hell for the artist, it's great for viewers: We get to watch as the talented painter goes back and forth between building taut compositions and blotting them out, leaving some shards scattered randomly and burying others under impenetrable layers of icy white paint. It's a give-and-take drama whose quiet fury is fueled by a kind of decisiveness that brooks little compromise and takes no prisoners. At Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, each of Appel's 11 new paintings begins as a pristine, porcelain-coated canvas onto which enlarged photographs get mechanically printed in ultraviolet inks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010
Reviews by David Pagel (D.P.). Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. Critics' Choices Nathaniel de Large: at large De Large is a light-handed junk-picker whose search for quirky stuff is only the beginning of an out-of-step quest to refashion the world into a playground for the imagination. The L.A. artist gets viewers to experience the world as a loopy adventure, a meandering journey filled with serendipitous twists and wonderful turns that keep us on our toes, almost dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
Billy Collins, among the most accessible of contemporary poets and an eloquent advocate of poetry's place in public life, spoke recently about why people tend to resist the genre. Too much emphasis, he feels, is put on interpretation, to the detriment of poetry's "less teachable, more bodily pleasures. " Collins' words came to mind when hearing Enrique Martínez Celaya talk about his new paintings and sculpture at L.A. Louver and how efforts to decipher the meaning of a work of art too often hijacks the experience of it. In the case of visual art, and especially art like his that makes use of familiar, recognizable imagery, "we're so attached to what's given," he said, "rather than what's underneath what's given.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By David Pagel
Raw talent, restless energy and the sense that something has gone very wrong run every which way in Natalie Frank's new paintings, which turn themselves inside out with such wicked swiftness that it's hard to know up from down, good from bad, us from them. The New York painter is no purist. Titled “The Scene of a Disappearance,” her first solo show in Los Angeles, at Acme, is a big messy mix of people and beasts, their limbs, organs and torsos rearranged in ways that rival Picasso's wildest paintings while capturing the grisliness of crime-scene TV. Frank slices and dices like a food processor, chopping Francis Bacon's ghoulish humans and Lucian Freud's meaty people into bite-size chunks she then cooks into dishes that look delicious from a distance but monstrous up close.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By David Pagel
History, it's often said, is written by the winners. If that task fell to the nut jobs, the world might be more interesting. High school textbooks would certainly be more entertaining. At Monte Vista, Ben White's new paintings treat history as a swirling stew of possibility, a kind of primordial ooze filled with more twists and turns than a pretzel and more wacky coincidences than a conspiracy-theorist could make sense of. Ten midsize panels line the gallery's walls. Each depicts a historical figure or two, at a time and in a place they may never have visited.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
No Entropic school of art has announced itself as such, but the concept seems to animate a good deal of drawn and painted work of the past decade or more -- images of intense and unpredictable energy, change and disorder. Julie Mehretu might be considered a chief practitioner. The speed and unwieldiness of the information age is one clear source for the vocabulary of charged, global fluidity; a post-9/11 tenor of physical and political uncertainty is likely another. The increasingly volatile collision of nature and culture, in the form of large-scale natural disasters, is yet another catalyst for this type of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
When Laura Owens was looking for a studio that could double as an exhibition space for her first show in L.A. since 2003, she considered a variety of buildings. There was an out-of-business Glidden paint shop on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood and a small defunct church on Melrose nearby. But those spaces seemed too specific or loaded architecturally. So it was something of a revelation when she first visited 356 South Mission Road, a 12,000-square-foot stand-alone industrial building in Boyle Heights that had originally housed a lithography studio in the '40s and later served as storage space for pianos - including Liberace's.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
Billy Collins, among the most accessible of contemporary poets and an eloquent advocate of poetry's place in public life, spoke recently about why people tend to resist the genre. Too much emphasis, he feels, is put on interpretation, to the detriment of poetry's "less teachable, more bodily pleasures. " Collins' words came to mind when hearing Enrique Martínez Celaya talk about his new paintings and sculpture at L.A. Louver and how efforts to decipher the meaning of a work of art too often hijacks the experience of it. In the case of visual art, and especially art like his that makes use of familiar, recognizable imagery, "we're so attached to what's given," he said, "rather than what's underneath what's given.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
The first piece I saw by Charles Christopher Hill was a tiny, thickly painted striped canvas that, despite being less than 6 inches square, had an inexplicable presence. I assumed it dated from the reign of Minimalism in the 1970s, but it was actually created in 2009. Hill's latest exhibition at Leslie Sacks Contemporary provides a spare but intriguing back story for this apparent anachronism. The earliest works in the show, from the late 1970s, are among the best: large, torn paper collages, shot through with stitching.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1997 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Reverie and Despair: At first, Emilio Cueto's stark new paintings at Newspace yield little but texture and tone. Half of them, painted on wood, are smooth and slick, an inky black in the corners dissolving to a smoky puff of gray in the center. The others, painted on canvas, are an all-over pristine ivory, with occasional sanded-down blips and bumps that hint at underlying, contrasting layers of paint.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Pagel
The lines in Bart Exposito's new paintings at Thomas Solomon Gallery do things the lines in his old paintings didn't: slip away from the shapes they demarcate to float in spaces that are more atmospheric than anything the artist has painted since he began exhibiting 15 years ago. This transformation may have something to do with Exposito's recent move from Los Angeles to Santa Fe and his commute to Albuquerque, where he teaches. Like the landscape he drives through, most of his new works are horizontal.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By David Pagel
Kevin Appel's new paintings are at war with themselves. While that may be hell for the artist, it's great for viewers: We get to watch as the talented painter goes back and forth between building taut compositions and blotting them out, leaving some shards scattered randomly and burying others under impenetrable layers of icy white paint. It's a give-and-take drama whose quiet fury is fueled by a kind of decisiveness that brooks little compromise and takes no prisoners. At Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, each of Appel's 11 new paintings begins as a pristine, porcelain-coated canvas onto which enlarged photographs get mechanically printed in ultraviolet inks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
Once inside a painting by Iva Gueorguieva, it's hard to leave. It's hard to want to leave. The surfaces, colors, shapes all clamor for attention, whisking the eye on a brisk, pinball course in disparate directions, then granting it moments of reprieve, small sanctuaries of brooding beauty. This is 21st century action painting, cousin to last century's version in its physicality, its conflation of internal and external realities and its scale. The largest -- and best -- works in Gueorguieva's show at Susanne Vielmetter exceed and envelop you. At more than 70 inches high and 100 inches wide, they literally position you within them by occupying your entire field of vision, the optical equivalent of surround sound.
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