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New Prime Minister

WORLD
October 28, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili named a new prime minister, saying the former Soviet state needed "new energy" to tackle fresh challenges after the war with Russia in August. Saakashvili, under pressure after the crushing military defeat, asked parliament to approve 35-year-old Grigol Mgaloblishvili, the ambassador to Turkey, to replace Lado Gurgenidze. Saakashvili told parliamentary deputies that he and Gurgenidze had made a joint decision, saying constitutional amendments obliged him to name a new prime minister after parliamentary elections held in May. He told a later meeting of majority party leaders that Gurgenidze's departure had been planned before the war.
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WORLD
October 12, 2008 | From the Associated Press
President Alan Garcia announced Saturday that he has appointed a leftist governor as Peru's prime minister, a day after the entire Cabinet resigned amid a brewing oil kickbacks scandal. Longtime politician Yehude Simon, 61, will replace outgoing Prime Minister Jorge del Castillo, Garcia said. Simon said that two of the officials who resigned, Foreign Minister Garcia Belaunde and Trade Minister Mercedes Araoz, will retain their posts in the new, multiparty Cabinet.
WORLD
September 17, 2008 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Zimbabwe's new prime minister said President Robert Mugabe could not be held accountable for the political violence during his 28-year rule but that others might face prosecution in the future. Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, leader of the Movement for Democratic Change, spoke to The Times at his home Tuesday, a day after his longtime opposition group signed a power-sharing agreement with Mugabe and his ZANU-PF party. The issue of prosecutions over political violence and killings is so contentious that it was left out of the deal negotiations.
WORLD
March 25, 2008 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Deposed Chief Justice Iftikhar Mohammed Chaudhry, an icon of resistance to the rule of Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, emerged late Monday from nearly five months of house arrest. His release was the first act of a Benazir Bhutto loyalist elected prime minister hours earlier. It was the latest tumultuous twist in a Pakistani political saga that over the last year has seen the fall from grace of the U.S.-backed Musharraf, the Dec. 27 assassination of Bhutto and the triumph of her party in February's parliamentary elections.
WORLD
November 25, 2007 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration lost one of its staunchest political allies Saturday when Australians chose a Mandarin-speaking former farm boy to become their new prime minister. Labor Party candidate Kevin Rudd swept to power in a landslide victory over Liberal incumbent John Howard, the second-longest serving prime minister in Australian history.
WORLD
July 31, 2007 | Maura Reynolds and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
President Bush and Britain's new prime minister, Gordon Brown, emphasized Monday that their nations are united by shared values and a deep commitment to defeat global terrorism. But Brown also telegraphed his differences with the U.S. president over the issue, choosing to define the struggle as a fight against crime, instead of a war on terror, and calling Afghanistan, not Iraq, the front line.
WORLD
July 2, 2007 | Janet Stobart and Marjorie Miller, Times Staff Writers
Prime Minister Gordon Brown's first days in office have been a baptism by fire, with three soldiers killed Thursday in Iraq, two car bombings foiled Friday in London and a fiery attack Saturday on Scotland's Glasgow Airport. On Sunday, he warned the British public that they faced "a long-term threat" from Islamist militants. Brown has indicated he will shift Britain away from his predecessor Tony Blair's whole-hearted support of the U.S.
WORLD
June 27, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
He shows up for work in famously drab ties with his nails bitten to the quick. He hates networking, and didn't marry until he was 49. He's the glowering figure often seen harrumphing on the bench behind his preternaturally poised boss, Prime Minister Tony Blair, in the House of Commons. You might say he's the anti-Blair, in more ways than one.
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