Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNew Republic
IN THE NEWS

New Republic

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 9, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook and coordinator of Barack Obama's online efforts during the 2008 presidential election, is entering the "old media" fray as publisher and editor-in-chief of the New Republic, the publication announced Friday. Initial response? Journalists who do not write for the New Republic are seething with envy, and wonder if perhaps another Silicon Valley millionaire/billionaire would like to come and inject an infusion of new-media money into their publication too. But it's not just the money, it's also what Hughes is saying about the state of journalism today that is drawing attention.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | Meghan Daum
More than 15 years after fabricating some 42 articles for the New Republic, Rolling Stone and other magazines, Stephen Glass was back in the news this week. On Monday, the California Supreme Court ruled that Glass, 41, does not have the moral character "critical to the practice of law. " He has been trying for a decade to overcome that hurdle. He's certainly qualified otherwise. Glass graduated from Georgetown Law School in 2000, passed bar exams in New York and California, and has worked for years as a paralegal at a Beverly Hills firm.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2009 | Associated Press
The political magazine the New Republic has been sold back to its longtime editor in chief. Canada's largest media company, Canwest Global Communications Corp., said Monday that it sold the magazine to a group of private investors that includes editor Martin Peretz and investment banker Lauren Grafstein for an undisclosed amount. Canwest bought the liberal magazine from Peretz two years ago. Canwest spokesman John Douglas said the company was trying to clean up its balance sheet and shed non-core assets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Gotta admit, I was rooting for Stephen Glass in his quest to be admitted to the California bar. I had trouble grasping how a disgraced "wunderkind" journalist who made up or falsely embellished some 40 magazine stories in the late-1990s could not be considered rehabilitated after abjectly apologizing, undergoing 12 years of psychotherapy, attending law school, working as a law clerk, providing free legal aid to homeless clients and generally reinventing...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By David Colker and Steven Zeitchik
Film critic Stanley Kauffmann, who in the 20th century helped define movie reviews as an intellectual form, died of pneumonia Wednesday at St. Luke's Hospital in New York. He was 97. His death was announced by the New Republic, the politics and culture magazine that published his criticism for more than five decades. Although Kauffmann's commentary tended toward the intellectual and often went against the grain - finding fault in heralded movies such as "The Godfather," "Pulp Fiction" and "Full Metal Jacket" - he championed the rise of serious cinema in the late 1950s and 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Stephen R. Glass , a former journalist who became infamous for fabricating magazine articles, may not practice law in California because he has failed to show sufficient rehabilitation, the state's high court decided Monday. In a unanimous, unsigned ruling, the California Supreme Court said Glass had demonstrated a pattern for deceit for which he has not adequately atoned. Glass has failed to "establish that he engaged in truly exemplary conduct over an extended period," the court said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1987
I was surprised to read SBK Entertainment World's denial that it had refused the New Republic permission to reprint the lyrics to the Beatles' "Revolution" (Pop Eye, by Patrick Goldstein, May 10). Before Jon Wiener's piece, "Beatles Buy-Out" (the New Republic, May 11), went to press, I spoke with David Wolfson, the manager of renewals and permissions at SBK in New York. In the phone call and then in a letter, Wolfson stated, "Upon reading this article, we feel that it is offensive, and we decline in granting you permission to use any of the lyrics from the above song."
NEWS
March 11, 2008
Martinez column: In Monday's California section, Al Martinez said that Stephen Glass "must hold some kind of record for writing 23 pieces for Nation magazine that contained partial or total lies." Glass wrote for the New Republic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988
Michael Kinsley, editor of the New Republic, said it all: "Bush . . . obviously lacks true political principles of any sort. His record of lifelong flip-flops and postures of convenience protects him" (Op-Ed Page, Sept. 30). P.T. Barnum is waiting for the Reagan Administration to end to get back his crown. JACK HOWARDS Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Paul Zuckerman was sifting through resumes when he paused, "astounded," over a particularly strong applicant for a law clerk opening: Ivy League undergraduate, top-notch law school, legal work for two judges in Washington. Zuckerman's Los Angeles County firm handled personal injury cases - auto accidents and slip-and-falls. He figured the applicant, whose credentials marked him for a prestigious "white shoe" firm, had applied to the wrong place. Then he read the cover letter. Stephen Randall Glass wrote that he was a disgraced former Washington journalist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Stephen R. Glass , a former journalist who became infamous for fabricating magazine articles, may not practice law in California because he has failed to show sufficient rehabilitation, the state's high court decided Monday. In a unanimous, unsigned ruling, the California Supreme Court said Glass had demonstrated a pattern for deceit for which he has not adequately atoned. Glass has failed to "establish that he engaged in truly exemplary conduct over an extended period," the court said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Stanley Kauffmann, who died Wednesday at 97, will be remembered for his intellectually rigorous, neatly manicured film reviews -- the meditative yin to Pauline Kael's ecstatic yang. But as a drama critic, I'm especially grateful for his equally acute body of drama criticism, which is a tonic to read in this age of trumped-up enthusiasms and attention-grabbing pans. “Persons of the Drama,” one of Kauffmann's collections of theater criticism, can usually be found in a pile on my desk with anthologies of theater reviews by his friends and colleagues Robert Brustein, Gordon Rogoff and the late Richard Gilman, all of whom taught at the Yale School of Drama and helped (directly and indirectly)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Stanley Kauffmann, the longtime film and theater critic of The New Republic who in the 20th century helped define movie reviews as an intellectual form, has died. He was 97. Kauffmann died from complications of pneumonia in New York. A tribute will be held honoring his work but there will be no funeral, per his request, a New Republic spokesman said Wednesday. Over his 54 years at the magazine, Kauffmann assessed innumerable cinematic masterpieces and helped bring a number of seminal directors to light, particularly the New Hollywood filmmakers of the 1970s and European upstart auteurs such as Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By David Colker and Steven Zeitchik
Film critic Stanley Kauffmann, who in the 20th century helped define movie reviews as an intellectual form, died of pneumonia Wednesday at St. Luke's Hospital in New York. He was 97. His death was announced by the New Republic, the politics and culture magazine that published his criticism for more than five decades. Although Kauffmann's commentary tended toward the intellectual and often went against the grain - finding fault in heralded movies such as "The Godfather," "Pulp Fiction" and "Full Metal Jacket" - he championed the rise of serious cinema in the late 1950s and 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Paul Zuckerman was sifting through resumes when he paused, "astounded," over a particularly strong applicant for a law clerk opening: Ivy League undergraduate, top-notch law school, legal work for two judges in Washington. Zuckerman's Los Angeles County firm handled personal injury cases - auto accidents and slip-and-falls. He figured the applicant, whose credentials marked him for a prestigious "white shoe" firm, had applied to the wrong place. Then he read the cover letter. Stephen Randall Glass wrote that he was a disgraced former Washington journalist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
When Iranians rose up and marched against their rulers, people around the world felt they were there. Facebook bristled with video from the streets of Tehran. Revolutionary-green avatars sprouted across the Web. Commentators heralded a coming "Twitter Revolution. " The euphoria was pervasive - until a radical skeptic punctured the conventional wisdom. Evgeny Morozov, a virtually unknown writer and sometime technology advocate, launched his counteroffensive three years ago at the annual TED ideas conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1987
New Republic euphemist and presidential apologist Morton Kondracke (Editorial Pages, Jan. 15) is a worthy successor to the "inoperative" press secretary to Richard Nixon, Ron Ziegler. Kondracke writes: ". . . the President has stumbled . . . the Iran mess isn't much . . . the Administration did wrong . . . it violated the spirit . . ." ad nauseam. He omitted "disinformation." I call it "lying" and "hypocrisy." EUGENE FRIEDMAN Granada Hills
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | Washington Post
Stephen Glass, who had never uttered a public word about his repeated fabrications at the New Republic five years ago, is cashing in on his notoriety. He lied to his editors, his family and his readers, Glass told "60 Minutes" in an interview airing Sunday to promote a forthcoming novel.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Tribune Newspapers
It takes guts to write a satire about terrorism - and Lionel Shriver has guts. She has already published biting novels about the failings of the U.S. healthcare system ("So Much for That") and a school shooter ("We Need to Talk About Kevin"). Terrorism? Why not? In "The New Republic," the problem is in Barba, a Portuguese peninsula with a legitimate yet tiny political movement seeking independence, and an unaffiliated - so they say - terrorist arm that has taken up international violence.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|