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NEWS
September 2, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
The racial violence that has shaken a Brooklyn neighborhood has magnified the battle of constituency politics for the chief contenders in New York's bitterly fought Democratic mayoral primary. Fear and anger, many politicians believe, could drive up turnout, and the candidate best able to mobilize his supporters could win what is perceived as a very close election on Sept. 12. In an effort to mobilize black voters, Manhattan Borough President David N.
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NEWS
August 22, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are this celebrity-crazed city's newest odd couple--one, the real-life inspiration for the jobless slacker on TV's "Seinfeld" and the other the infamous subway vigilante turned savior for injured squirrels. But rather than sharing a bachelor pad, Kenny Kramer and Bernard H. Goetz have seized onto the same unlikely dream that has locals both laughing out loud and launching an unceremonious Bronx cheer. They're running for mayor of New York.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long campaign for mayor of New York City ended in a barrage of bitter accusations Monday as former U.S. Atty. Rudolph W. Giuliani charged that Democratic rival David N. Dinkins would be the subject of multiple investigations if elected mayor. Giuliani, the Republican and Liberal Party candidate, held a series of "integrity" rallies Monday, trying at the last minute to convince voters that character should be the centerpiece of the election.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democrat David N. Dinkins defeated former U.S. Atty. Rudolph W. Giuliani Tuesday by stressing the politics of conciliation in the face of Giuliani's efforts to turn the election into a referendum on character and competence. The 62-year-old Manhattan Borough president, who becomes the city's first black mayor, forged his winning coalition by building on his solid black base. He received virtually all black votes, 21% of all those cast, according to a WNBC-TV/New York Newsday exit poll.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former U.S. Atty. Rudolph W. Giuliani, as expected, sharply attacked the character and competence of his Democratic mayoral rival, David N. Dinkins, Saturday when the two finally met in their first debate. Dinkins countered by saying that New York City needs a mayor, not a prosecutor. Giuliani went into the debate trailing in the polls, and analysts said he needed to score something close to a political knockout, which he apparently did not.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning surprise in the New York City Democratic primary, the Rev. Al Sharpton apparently forced the front-runner, Manhattan Borough President Ruth W. Messinger, into a runoff for the right to oppose Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in November. Messinger finished first in the primary but failed by a single point to gain the necessary 40% of the vote to gain the nomination. With all precincts reporting, Messinger had 39%, Sharpton 32% and Brooklyn City Councilman Sal F. Albanese 21%.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Manhattan Borough President David N. Dinkins Tuesday shattered Mayor Edward I. Koch's hope of a historic fourth term in office, winning the Democratic primary and taking a major step toward becoming New York City's first black mayor. Dinkins will face former U.S. Atty. Rudolph W. Giuliani, who gained a national reputation fighting white collar crime and drugs, in November's general election.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | HOWARD KURTZ, The Washington Post
Comedian Jackie Mason was dropped Wednesday as a high-profile advocate for Republican mayoral nominee Rudolph W. Giuliani after telling the Village Voice that Jews are voting for Democrat David N. Dinkins out of guilt and that Dinkins "looks like a black model without a job." The comments in an interview published Wednesday caused an immediate uproar by directly raising the issue of Dinkins' race in a way that Giuliani has avoided.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | Associated Press
Both leading candidates for a City Council seat are openly gay and one announced Thursday he has tested positive for the AIDS virus. "In one sense, it's nobody's business that I've tested positive for the presence of the HIV virus in my blood," Tom Duane wrote in a letter mailed to 40,000 households on Manhattan's West Side. "But I am a candidate for public office, and I believe in being candid." Duane is running against Liz Abzug, daughter of former Rep.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fingers were pointing in all directions Wednesday over why the news media polling in this week's elections was so inaccurate, particularly in historic races in New York and Virginia, where polls put black candidates much further ahead than they actually were. The commonly heard explanation is simply that people lie, telling pollsters they will vote for a black candidate when in fact they will not.
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