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NEWS
April 6, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Has Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton lost just his voice in New York--or also part of his message? That's what some advocates of government reform--including several in the orbit of Clinton's Democratic presidential campaign--say they are wondering after listening to his discussion of urban issues here.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
Several relatives and friends of former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani have held on to well-paying City Hall jobs despite a change in administration and deep budget cuts. The former Giuliani aides generally have stayed on the city's payroll without attracting much public attention. This week Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg appointed Giuliani cousin Raymond Casey as president of Off-Track Betting Corp., which operates city betting parlors.
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NEWS
December 7, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The New York City Council has approved legislation to protect the health and safety of more than 12,000 city workers who use video display terminals. The bill is the toughest VDT law in the nation and the first law of its kind in a major city, according to the New York City Video Display Terminal Coalition of labor unions and occupational safety and health groups.
NEWS
February 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and Parks Commissioner Henry Stern denied that staffing and job promotion at the Parks Department is racially biased. A group of 20 black and Latino parks employees has filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, saying the department overlooked them for promotions, gave raises to less-qualified whites and retaliated against them when they spoke out.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Mayor Edward I. Koch said Saturday he will issue an executive order granting bereavement leave rights to homosexuals and unmarried heterosexuals whose "domestic partners" die. The mayor told the Associated Press that the city also would consider extending health insurance benefits to the same city workers included in the bereavement order in the next collective bargaining session with unions. Koch said he would issue the order within several weeks.
NEWS
February 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and Parks Commissioner Henry Stern denied that staffing and job promotion at the Parks Department is racially biased. A group of 20 black and Latino parks employees has filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, saying the department overlooked them for promotions, gave raises to less-qualified whites and retaliated against them when they spoke out.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mayor David N. Dinkins said that thousands of city workers will be laid off because of an unexpected and steep falloff in revenues. Philip Michael, the city's budget director, gave a preliminary estimate of 20,000 jobs that could be eliminated through layoffs and attrition. Services will also be cut, he said, although no details were available. Michael said the budget gap for the 1991 fiscal year has grown to $500 million, double the $250-million gap estimated three weeks ago.
NEWS
February 19, 1988
Thousands of New York City firemen marched across the Brooklyn Bridge and surrounded City Hall, tying up traffic to protest city tactics used in the closing of a firehouse. The demonstration underscored outrage over the methods used to shut Engine Company 232, in Brooklyn's Brownsville section, as part of an effort to trim the city budget.
NEWS
October 28, 1987 | United Press International
Mayor Edward I. Koch imposed a 90-day hiring freeze on the city Tuesday and announced a series of emergency measures intended to guard against possible revenue losses caused by Wall Street's stock crisis. Koch, in a City Hall news conference, said that the city would indefinitely delay the hiring of 5,200 municipal employees--a step expected to save the city $14.5 million by Feb. 1.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David N. Dinkins is in trouble. Just ask Antonia Dosik. Dosik, 46, head of a nonprofit community services agency in a blue-collar section of Queens, put in many an off-duty hour in 1989 to help elect Dinkins as New York's first black mayor. "I was very heartened," she said. "I didn't expect miracles, but I did expect an understanding of how things worked on a neighborhood basis that I never felt when Ed Koch was mayor."
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | Newsday
Mayor David N. Dinkins has appointed the city's first clock master since the 1930s. Dinkins on Friday gave the job to Marvin Schneider, a Human Resources Administration worker who has maintained city-owned clocks on an unofficial basis since 1980. Schneider will still work for the HRA, but will be granted 40 hours a year paid release time to work on six city-owned clocks.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Has Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton lost just his voice in New York--or also part of his message? That's what some advocates of government reform--including several in the orbit of Clinton's Democratic presidential campaign--say they are wondering after listening to his discussion of urban issues here.
NEWS
May 19, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David N. Dinkins is in trouble. Just ask Antonia Dosik. Dosik, 46, head of a nonprofit community services agency in a blue-collar section of Queens, put in many an off-duty hour in 1989 to help elect Dinkins as New York's first black mayor. "I was very heartened," she said. "I didn't expect miracles, but I did expect an understanding of how things worked on a neighborhood basis that I never felt when Ed Koch was mayor."
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | BARRY BEARAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York Mayor David N. Dinkins on Friday presented a "doomsday" budget that would pare the Big Apple toward a seedy core, boosting taxes while turning off 25% of the street lights, laying off 28,000 city workers and closing many libraries, clinics and the Central Park Zoo. All week, New Yorkers have heard grim tidbits about what bad times have wrought, including a somber televised speech in which the mayor suggested that citizens themselves might have to pick litter off the streets.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mayor David N. Dinkins said that thousands of city workers will be laid off because of an unexpected and steep falloff in revenues. Philip Michael, the city's budget director, gave a preliminary estimate of 20,000 jobs that could be eliminated through layoffs and attrition. Services will also be cut, he said, although no details were available. Michael said the budget gap for the 1991 fiscal year has grown to $500 million, double the $250-million gap estimated three weeks ago.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph DeVincenzo, once a $104,500-a-year top aide to former New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch, was indicted last August for running a so-called "talent bank" that provided lucrative city jobs to workers loyal to the Koch Administration. Koch's talent bank was one of the last vestiges of the Tammany Hall-style machine politics that once dominated the government of New York and many other states and municipalities across the nation.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | From United Press International
John F. Kennedy Jr. flunked the New York state bar exam for a second time and has one last chance to pass or lose his job as an assistant prosecutor, a spokeswoman for the Manhattan District Attorney's Office confirmed Monday. "All assistants get three chances. It's a long-standing office policy," said Colleen Roche, spokeswoman for Manhattan Dist. Atty. Robert M. Morgenthau. The 29-year-old only son of assassinated President John F.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One observer is calling it "Larry & Me." Exxon Corp. Chairman Lawrence G. Rawl has already turned down one request for a meeting with New York City Comptroller Elizabeth Holtzman, who manages five city pension plans that own Exxon stock, to discuss the company's environmental record.
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