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NATIONAL
July 21, 2005 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
His colleagues in the newsroom and at papers nationwide know incoming Los Angeles Times Editor Dean Baquet as a driven and perceptive journalist who loves above all to talk about how to cover the news. When Baquet first joined The Times as managing editor five years ago, his deputies often felt overwhelmed; he suggested so many story ideas, they didn't know how they could possibly follow them all.
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NEWS
April 6, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Has Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton lost just his voice in New York--or also part of his message? That's what some advocates of government reform--including several in the orbit of Clinton's Democratic presidential campaign--say they are wondering after listening to his discussion of urban issues here.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many residents complain it is the Rodney Dangerfield of boroughs: It gets no respect. Even Staten Island's attempt to withdraw from the rest of New York City has been labeled a sitcom secession. For most people, Staten Island is the forgotten of the five boroughs forming New York City, the mere end of a spectacular ferry ride.
SPORTS
October 19, 1988 | ROGER KAHN, Special to The Times and (Roger Kahn, a lifelong follower of baseball, covered the Dodgers for the New York Herald Tribune. He is also the author of eight books, including "The Boys of Summer" and "Good Enough to Dream.")
I saw my first Dodger World Series game in 1920, 7 years before I was born. The viewing instrument was my father, who relished baseball and had so vivid and detailed a memory that friends called him, somewhat laboriously, the walking encyclopedia. We were indeed walking on a quiet Brooklyn street and he began to recall a game, Oct. 10, 1920, when the Dodgers fell behind the Cleveland Indians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles City Council, which is seeking a nearly $33,000-a-year pay raise, already is the highest paid city council in the country, according to a Times survey. If voters approve a June ballot measure, annual salaries for the 15 council members will rise to $94,344--more than many big-city mayors and all but five governors. Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, for example, makes $80,000 a year, and Gov. George Deukmejian receives $85,000.
WORLD
September 17, 2005 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Even Miss Manners might blanch at the task at hand: charm school for a billion people, a good number of them convinced that life means never having to say you're sorry, excuse me or thank you. This is no tutorial on fish forks. In advance of the 2008 Olympics, the government has embarked on a crash campaign to instill manners in the world's most populous country.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At T-minus 28 minutes, Maury Povich was smack in the middle of what for him and much of America in the 1990s is a normal day--husbands and wives and trouble--and KCAL Channel 9 was televising it as usual. At T-minus 10, normalcy continued. At liftoff, however, even Povich paused in his labors--or at least KCAL did--long enough to join the nation in watching John Glenn's second liftoff into space. Crowds gathered in restaurants, on street corners, in retirement homes and in schools.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
My old neighborhood in the Highbridge section of the Bronx is poorer and more threatening now than it was 40 years ago, when I grew up here. As children played at recess recently, police forced open the trunk of a car parked near Sacred Heart School and found a woman bound and gagged but alive.
BOOKS
June 23, 2002 | RUSS BAKER, Russ Baker is a contributing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review.
Something has happened to American journalism. Within the increasingly corporate corridors of newspapers today, depressingly few editors or reporters stand out for doing things differently. There are good and legitimate reasons why newspeople are encouraged to excel only within conventional bounds (ownership, finances, public perceptions, presumed neutrality). But there are equally good reasons (often the very same ones) for celebrating freethinkers and mavericks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1990 | SEAN MITCHELL
Quietly at first and then not so quietly, it became clear that the epidemic of AIDS was stalking America's artistic community in the second half of the 1980s. An infectious disease, acquired immune deficiency syndrome took the lives of thousands of artists and entertainers, spurred others to respond with works addressing the epidemic, politicized art exhibitions and grant proposals, and made the 1980s seem like wartime.
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