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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2011 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The New York City school system can publicly release performance ratings for more than 12,000 teachers based on their students' test scores, in what would be the largest such disclosure in the country, a Manhattan judge ruled Monday. The interests of parents and taxpayers outweigh the privacy rights of public employees, said Manhattan Judge Cynthia S. Kern. "The public has an interest in the job performance of public employees, particularly in the field of education," Kern wrote.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Some encouraging news on the childhood obesity front: Obesity levels among kindergartners through eighth-graders in New York City have gone down, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. The decline, says the report, is to date the largest drop on record in a large U.S. city in this population, and it may be due to a comprehensive intervention that included the tried-and-true recipe of better food and more physical activity. The CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released today finds that, from 2006 and 2007 to 2010 and 2011, obesity prevalence in kindergartners through eighth-graders in city public elementary and middle schools declined 5.5%, from 21.9% to 20.7%.
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NEWS
February 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
After months of debate and a last-minute compromise effort, the Board of Education voted Wednesday night to hand out condoms on request in the nation's largest school system, as part of a stepped up effort to fight AIDS. Condoms initially will be available at 30 to 35 schools, then phased in at the rest of the city's 120 schools, which enroll a total of 260,000 students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2011 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The New York City school system can publicly release performance ratings for more than 12,000 teachers based on their students' test scores, in what would be the largest such disclosure in the country, a Manhattan judge ruled Monday. The interests of parents and taxpayers outweigh the privacy rights of public employees, said Manhattan Judge Cynthia S. Kern. "The public has an interest in the job performance of public employees, particularly in the field of education," Kern wrote.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
Teachers and administrators at 32 New York City schools helped students cheat on standardized tests by providing them with questions in advance and even marking test forms for them, a special investigator for city schools charged Tuesday. His report describes crude cheating schemes designed to improve elementary and middle schools' performance on city and state tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990
Chancellor Joseph Fernandez of the New York City schools recently recommended distribution of condoms in his schools to help promote "safe sex." Your Sept. 30 editorial congratulated the chancellor for his leadership in this regard, and for keeping his personal religious convictions (Catholic) separate from his secular responsibilities. But there should be no difference between the religious and the secular. His moral and religious convictions should be intertwined with all his responsibilities.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East Harlem is inner-city America: where crack sells in rubble-caked lots, guns sound in the night, public housing darkens under graffiti, abandoned tenements rot on decrepit streets and tattered men just hang around. "You don't walk around here at night," said Allister Whitman, who supervises the speech programs in East Harlem's public schools. "If you walk around 109th Street," said Leslie Moore, director of a junior high school on that street, "you will see lines forming for crack.
NEWS
January 5, 1987
Security will be tightened at New York City public schools this week in an effort to prevent racial violence after last month's attack on three black men by a white mob, authorities said. Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones met with superintendents and key aides from throughout the school system to discuss today's resumption of classes after the winter recess. Students have been out of school since Dec. 23, three days after the attack in a predominantly white section of Queens.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | United Press International
The New York City schools chancellor charged Wednesday that teachers were "in part responsible" for a fatal racial attack because, he said, they have been ignoring festering racial tensions in the schools. Nathan Quinones, who heads the nation's largest school system, warned that, if educators do not start teaching students to respect different races and cultures, "certainly the beatings may well expand and continue."
NEWS
June 7, 1985 | TONY ROBINSON and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
Hounded out of regular New York City schools by taunts and fights, 20 high school students have enrolled in what is apparently the nation's first public school program to teach and counsel homosexual teen-agers. Classes began April 15 at the Harvey Milk School, named for the San Francisco official and gay activist who was murdered on Nov. 27, 1978. Classes are held in an annex of a small stone Methodist church in Manhattan's Greenwich Village.
OPINION
February 1, 2010 | By Margaret E. Raymond
Many charter school supporters believe their hour has come. Locally, charters play an increasingly integral part in the school reform agenda of the Los Angeles Unified School District. At the state level, California charters recently received a boost from legislation that permits them access to new bond funding for school construction. And nationally, the U.S. Department of Education's Race to the Top program includes high-quality charter schools among its priorities. But an improved outlook for charter schools is not a guaranteed cure-all for bad schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
In hopes of making it easier and more inviting for people to register to vote, California Secretary of State Debra Bowen released a new registration card Wednesday with simpler language, shorter sentences and larger print. "California's old voter registration card looked more like an imposing tax form instead of a simple invitation to participate in democracy," Bowen said. "The new card is inviting, it's intuitive, and most of all, it's a visual reminder that registering to vote is quick and easy."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
THE Juilliard School. Even the name sounds classy. With a roster of illustrious alumni that reads like a who's who of performing artists, the famed New York City institution has been the gold standard since it was founded in 1905. Reigning supreme as a conservatory, it broadened its reach to include dance in 1951 and drama in 1968, the same year it moved to Lincoln Center.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nearly 200 eighth-graders boycotted a state science exam with their parents' blessing in this well-to-do community of doctors, corporate executives and other high achievers. The school district in Scarsdale, a New York City suburb, said 195 of its 290 eighth-graders skipped the test to protest standardized exams and the increasing amount of classroom time spent preparing for them.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
New York City school counselors and teachers routinely discriminate against pregnant students and teenage parents, encouraging them to leave mainstream schools for specialized programs, a civil rights group charged. Schools designated for pregnant and parenting students are often weaker academically than the mainstream schools, said Donna Lieberman of the New York Civil Liberties Union. "It's illegal to segregate students because they're pregnant or have a baby," Lieberman said.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
Six months after uncovering widespread cheating on standardized tests, a city education watchdog charged Tuesday that nine teachers at eight schools improperly assisted students during testing. Special Commissioner of Investigation Edward Stancik, in a report summary to schools Chancellor Harold Levy, said additional reports of cheating surfaced after his initial investigation. Levy said he has asked his general counsel to review the report.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The money came from varied sources, all of it from the heart--checking accounts, wallets, piggy banks--as parents and pupils in Manhattan's affluent Greenwich Village scrambled to raise the $46,000 salary of a beloved fourth-grade public schoolteacher about to be cut from the staff. The money was collected in only four days.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
When Winsome Stewart's 6-year-old son Elisha climbs the steps of Bronx's Public School 53 each morning, he and the other young students sometimes take the opportunity to practice what they are learning in arithmetic skills. "They can count how many crack vials they see (littering) the steps," Elisha's horrified mother said Wednesday. P.S.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitterly divided New York City Board of Education voted 4 to 3 on Thursday against renewing the contract of Chancellor Rudy Crew, head of the nation's largest public school system. Crew's departure--which is scheduled for June, but could come much earlier--represents a clear victory for Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, who supported his ouster. "Change is good. It gives you another opportunity to reinvent things, to reform things," the mayor said Thursday.
NEWS
December 14, 1999
A state commission investigating possible attendance fraud in the city's public school system has found widespread, systemic abuse, including listing dead children among those reporting to class each day. Gov. George Pataki said Monday that the Moreland Act Commission's findings showed "a conscious pattern of abuse and fraud" aimed at inflating school rolls and getting state-allocated money. He renewed his call to abolish the city Board of Education.
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