Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNew York Post Newspaper
IN THE NEWS

New York Post Newspaper

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A former contributor to the New York Post's Page Six gossip column who was accused of trying to shake down Los Angeles billionaire Ron Burkle in exchange for good press will not be charged in the case. The case involving Jared Paul Stern is being closed, said an individual familiar with the federal investigation, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision was not yet public. Stern's lawyer confirmed that his client would not be indicted.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 7, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Rupert Murdoch pledged Wednesday to do everything possible to save his New York Post newspaper--even suing to overturn a new law requiring the media magnate to sell or shut the paper, his spokesman said. However, when asked about the fate of the Post on Cable News Network's "Crossfire" program, Murdoch said, "I think the odds are that I'll have to sell the Post," adding that "I'm not going to sell the Boston Herald." The Herald is making a profit, while the Post is losing money, Murdoch said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2004 | Dana Parsons
In a world where you can pause and rewind live TV (don't ask me how they do it), isn't it comforting that a newspaper still can blow it completely while trying for the old-fashioned political scoop? Sure, newspapers think it's really cool to get the story straight, but isn't there solace in knowing that real human beings put out your daily bugle instead of having output controlled by microchips? And that, as real human beings, a royal screw-up is always possible?
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Peter S. Kalikow, the real estate developer who owns the New York Post newspaper, filed for personal bankruptcy protection Tuesday. Kalikow, who blamed the recession and New York City's hard-hit real estate market, said, "I want to make it extremely clear that this filing will not affect the operation of the New York Post, which has operated profitably since last October." The flashy tabloid was founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801. Kalikow said the filing, under Chapter 11 of the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The owner of the New York Post has agreed to delay by three days his threat to close down the brassy tabloid to give a union time to vote on a proposal to stem its $20-million-a-year losses. Peter S. Kalikow, who has lost more than $100 million on the paper, delayed the threatened shutdown to allow the paper's Newspaper Guild to present a giveback proposal to its 352 members Monday evening.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER STERN, WASHINGTON POST
Federal regulators have told lawyers for Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. that they've temporarily stopped considering his $5.4-billion deal to acquire Chris-Craft Industries Inc. Regulators said they were waiting for more information from News Corp. about the financial condition of its New York Post.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A former contributor to the New York Post's Page Six gossip column who was accused of trying to shake down Los Angeles billionaire Ron Burkle in exchange for good press will not be charged in the case. The case involving Jared Paul Stern is being closed, said an individual familiar with the federal investigation, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision was not yet public. Stern's lawyer confirmed that his client would not be indicted.
SPORTS
June 4, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The soap opera that has become the Dodgers continued Wednesday with new story lines and plot twists, but the central theme was unchanged: turmoil. Fred Claire, executive vice president, again was compelled to clarify his status, and that of Manager Bill Russell, in response to a published report regarding their supposed pending dismissals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2004 | Dana Parsons
In a world where you can pause and rewind live TV (don't ask me how they do it), isn't it comforting that a newspaper still can blow it completely while trying for the old-fashioned political scoop? Sure, newspapers think it's really cool to get the story straight, but isn't there solace in knowing that real human beings put out your daily bugle instead of having output controlled by microchips? And that, as real human beings, a royal screw-up is always possible?
NATIONAL
July 7, 2004 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Hours before Americans learned that Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. John F. Kerry had picked North Carolina Sen. John Edwards to be his running mate, the New York Post ran its own exclusive report, beating the competition by a mile. But it got the story wrong. "Kerry's Choice," blared the front page. "Dem picks Gephardt as VP Candidate." The story, which ran without a byline on Page 4, said the tabloid had "learned" that Kerry had decided to pick Rep. Dick Gephardt (D-Mo.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2003 | Lorenza Munoz and Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writers
Federal authorities have opened an inquiry into how the New York Post obtained a bootlegged copy of Mel Gibson's controversial unreleased film "The Passion of Christ," three sources familiar with the matter said Thursday. The Post said Monday that it had obtained a "rough-cut version of the film that we screened -- with temporary English subtitles, no credits and further editing changes likely."
SPORTS
February 24, 2003 | Jason Reid, Times Staff Writer
The Dodgers have had a strong relationship with the Jewish community since moving to Los Angeles in 1958, and Jewish leaders said Sunday nothing should change despite the Sandy Koufax situation. The Hall of Fame pitcher severed ties with the Dodgers in protest of an item that appeared in the New York Post, which like the Dodgers is owned by News Corp., saying he would not return until the media conglomerate sold the franchise.
SPORTS
February 22, 2003 | Mike Penner
The legend is awesome, with its near mythic tales of no-hitters, strikeout records and home-run sluggers reduced to quivering lumps at the sight of the fearsome fastball. But we did not know the true measure of Sandy Koufax's clout until Friday, when the Hall of Fame pitcher and Dodger icon stared down Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. media conglomerate ... and mighty News Corp. flinched.
SPORTS
February 22, 2003 | Jason Reid, Times Staff Writer
The Dodgers expressed hope Friday that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax, who severed ties with them in protest of an item that appeared in the New York Post, may reconsider because of a published apology. Both the Dodgers and Post are owned by News Corp. The newspaper announced it would apologize to the Dodger icon in today's editions after intimating in a two-sentence gossip item published Dec. 19 that he is homosexual.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2003 | Louise Roug
Gotcha! For New York transplants in need of an ink-smudged fix, the New York Post begins distributing same-day editions in Southern California this week. Famous for its Page Six gossip and catchy headlines such as "Headless Body in Topless Bar," the tabloid is not expanding to become a national paper but simply responding to reader demand, said its general manager, Geoff Booth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2003 | Louise Roug
Gotcha! For New York transplants in need of an ink-smudged fix, the New York Post begins distributing same-day editions in Southern California this week. Famous for its Page Six gossip and catchy headlines such as "Headless Body in Topless Bar," the tabloid is not expanding to become a national paper but simply responding to reader demand, said its general manager, Geoff Booth.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
N.Y. Times Drivers' Union Votes to Grant Concessions: New York Times truck drivers voted to end their three-week labor dispute, ratifying contracts that guarantee jobs in exchange for concessions to the paper and wholesale newspaper distributors. The vote ended a sometimes violent dispute that had hampered newspaper deliveries. Although the contracts will directly affect about 1,100 drivers, the voting was open to all of the union's 2,900 members.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2002 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
N.Y. to L.A.: Buy This. That's the message the New York Post plans to pitch to Angelenos if it follows through on initial plans to start circulating the colorful tabloid controlled by Aussie media czar Rupert Murdoch. The Post already sells a small number of papers in Los Angeles, but they arrive here a day late. "We are getting the sense there is some demand from people who want it the same day, and we want to see if we can satisfy that," said Col Allan, the paper's editor.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER STERN, WASHINGTON POST
Federal regulators have told lawyers for Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. that they've temporarily stopped considering his $5.4-billion deal to acquire Chris-Craft Industries Inc. Regulators said they were waiting for more information from News Corp. about the financial condition of its New York Post.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|