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NATIONAL
February 20, 2009 | Associated Press
After two days of protests, the New York Post apologized Thursday for a cartoon that some have interpreted as comparing President Obama to a violent chimpanzee gunned down by police. The newspaper posted an editorial on its website Thursday evening saying the cartoon was meant to mock the federal economic stimulus bill, but "to those who were offended by the image, we apologize." The piece was posted hours after 200 picketers chanting "Boycott the Post! Shut it down!"
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BUSINESS
January 7, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Rupert Murdoch pledged Wednesday to do everything possible to save his New York Post newspaper--even suing to overturn a new law requiring the media magnate to sell or shut the paper, his spokesman said. However, when asked about the fate of the Post on Cable News Network's "Crossfire" program, Murdoch said, "I think the odds are that I'll have to sell the Post," adding that "I'm not going to sell the Boston Herald." The Herald is making a profit, while the Post is losing money, Murdoch said.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2009 | Associated Press
A New York Post cartoon that some have interpreted as comparing President Obama to a violent chimpanzee gunned down by police drew outrage Wednesday from civil rights leaders and elected officials who said it echoed racist stereotypes of blacks as monkeys. The cartoon in Wednesday's Post by Sean Delonas shows two police officers, one with a smoking gun, standing over the body of a bullet-riddled chimp. The caption reads: "They'll have to find someone else to write the next stimulus bill."
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Peter S. Kalikow, the real estate developer who owns the New York Post newspaper, filed for personal bankruptcy protection Tuesday. Kalikow, who blamed the recession and New York City's hard-hit real estate market, said, "I want to make it extremely clear that this filing will not affect the operation of the New York Post, which has operated profitably since last October." The flashy tabloid was founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1801. Kalikow said the filing, under Chapter 11 of the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2006 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Last week, news of Jared Paul Stern's Page Six payola scandal rippled through New York's media circles with all the force of an 800-pound bomb. The story has all the stranger-than-fiction twists you could ask for: media figures accused of Mafia-like strong-arm tactics, boldfaced names in compromising positions -- and at its core is a terrific Los Angeles story, hinging on a Southland billionaire and with tantalizing implications about the entertainment industry's backroom dealings.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The owner of the New York Post has agreed to delay by three days his threat to close down the brassy tabloid to give a union time to vote on a proposal to stem its $20-million-a-year losses. Peter S. Kalikow, who has lost more than $100 million on the paper, delayed the threatened shutdown to allow the paper's Newspaper Guild to present a giveback proposal to its 352 members Monday evening.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1993 | VICTOR ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pledging to shake up "the entrenched interests that have done so much damage to this city," Australian-born media mogul Rupert Murdoch on Monday reassumed control of the ailing New York Post. Murdoch's return to the Post, which he sold in 1988 because of federal regulations barring cross-ownership of newspapers and television stations in the same city, was the latest twist in the long-running soap opera about the feisty tabloid's struggle for survival.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER STERN, WASHINGTON POST
Federal regulators have told lawyers for Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. that they've temporarily stopped considering his $5.4-billion deal to acquire Chris-Craft Industries Inc. Regulators said they were waiting for more information from News Corp. about the financial condition of its New York Post.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A former contributor to the New York Post's Page Six gossip column who was accused of trying to shake down Los Angeles billionaire Ron Burkle in exchange for good press will not be charged in the case. The case involving Jared Paul Stern is being closed, said an individual familiar with the federal investigation, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision was not yet public. Stern's lawyer confirmed that his client would not be indicted.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2007 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
After a season in the limelight as a suspected extortionist, a former gossip columnist said Wednesday that he was relieved he wouldn't face federal charges of demanding payments in return for favorable coverage, and vowed to sue Los Angeles billionaire Ron Burkle and the New York Daily News for spreading the stories that ruined his career.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A former contributor to the New York Post's Page Six gossip column who was accused of trying to shake down Los Angeles billionaire Ron Burkle in exchange for good press will not be charged in the case. The case involving Jared Paul Stern is being closed, said an individual familiar with the federal investigation, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision was not yet public. Stern's lawyer confirmed that his client would not be indicted.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2006 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
The New York Post, which has maintained a Sphinx-like silence about the scandal over its Page Six gossip column, is restructuring the feature to reduce its reliance on freelancers. It was a freelancer, Jared Paul Stern, who was videotaped allegedly offering California billionaire Ron Burkle a guarantee of favorable coverage in exchange for payments that would amount to $220,000 over the course of a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
It takes a special kind of man to wear a monocle. You need to be a 19th century deep thinker, like Alfred, Lord Tennyson or Karl Marx, or maybe a jackbooted Aryan type, like Col. Klink on "Hogan's Heroes." It works too if you're a jaunty cartoon character with a top hat, like the Penguin from "Batman" or Mr. Peanut from the Planters label. Now we can add a new category to the accessories list of winking devotees: 21st century gossipmongers of Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2006 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Last week, news of Jared Paul Stern's Page Six payola scandal rippled through New York's media circles with all the force of an 800-pound bomb. The story has all the stranger-than-fiction twists you could ask for: media figures accused of Mafia-like strong-arm tactics, boldfaced names in compromising positions -- and at its core is a terrific Los Angeles story, hinging on a Southland billionaire and with tantalizing implications about the entertainment industry's backroom dealings.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2006 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
Jared Paul Stern, the gossip writer at the center of a federal extortion inquiry, said Monday he had discussed money with Ron Burkle, whom he knew socially through a friend, because he believed the California billionaire wanted to invest in his clothing company. Stern, 35, spoke by telephone from the Catskills farmhouse where he has been since late last week, when investigators from the U.S. attorney's office told his bosses at the New York Post about the investigation.
SPORTS
June 4, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The soap opera that has become the Dodgers continued Wednesday with new story lines and plot twists, but the central theme was unchanged: turmoil. Fred Claire, executive vice president, again was compelled to clarify his status, and that of Manager Bill Russell, in response to a published report regarding their supposed pending dismissals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2004 | Dana Parsons
In a world where you can pause and rewind live TV (don't ask me how they do it), isn't it comforting that a newspaper still can blow it completely while trying for the old-fashioned political scoop? Sure, newspapers think it's really cool to get the story straight, but isn't there solace in knowing that real human beings put out your daily bugle instead of having output controlled by microchips? And that, as real human beings, a royal screw-up is always possible?
NATIONAL
April 8, 2006 | Ellen Barry and Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writers
Stepping into the hypercompetitive arena of New York gossip, Jared Paul Stern wasn't afraid to spew a little poison. As a writer for the New York Post, he described Melanie Griffith and Goldie Hawn as "cryogenic freeze jobs gone awry," called Elton John "too old, fat and short to look ironically hip in ugly sweatsuits," and once mused that "whenever you see a beautiful girl, it pays to remember that somewhere, someone is sick of her."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2004 | Dana Parsons
In a world where you can pause and rewind live TV (don't ask me how they do it), isn't it comforting that a newspaper still can blow it completely while trying for the old-fashioned political scoop? Sure, newspapers think it's really cool to get the story straight, but isn't there solace in knowing that real human beings put out your daily bugle instead of having output controlled by microchips? And that, as real human beings, a royal screw-up is always possible?
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