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New York Rangers Hockey Team

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July 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Mike Keenan dispute was resolved Sunday night in a complicated settlement announced by NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman. Keenan, who coached the New York Rangers to their first Stanley Cup title in 54 years before bolting for the St. Louis Blues, was suspended for 60 days and fined $100,000. The Blues and Detroit Red Wings were fined, and the Rangers and Blues completed a trade approved by Bettman.
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SPORTS
July 21, 1994 | MIKE LUPICA, NEWSDAY
Mike Keenan will get what is coming to him eventually, because his kind of grasping hustler always does. Keenan hated working for Neil Smith, New York Ranger president, and so came up with this outrageous scam to make a score somewhere else. And when the court cases and the arbitrations are over, Keenan will end up with the St. Louis Blues. And Coach Keenan will end up working for one of the lousy guys in his business: General Manager Keenan.
SPORTS
June 30, 1994 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first day of the draft, plenty of NHL players were tuned in to see who their future teammates might be. But on Day 2--Rounds 3-11--they were going about their business. Troy Loney was preparing to move some belongings to California. Sean Hill was driving from Minneapolis to his home in Duluth, Minn. Tom Kurvers was going to play golf. And then the phones started to ring. "My wife was feeding the baby and couldn't get to the phone," Loney said.
SPORTS
June 16, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They passed the Stanley Cup lovingly from hand to hand, its weight feather-light to the New York Rangers in their joy at finally winning hockey's elusive prize. From team captain Mark Messier it went to Kevin Lowe, the Rangers' second-oldest player. From Lowe to Brian Leetch, winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy as the most valuable player in the playoffs. From Leetch to Adam Graves, who set a club record this season with 52 goals.
SPORTS
June 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
Not a single arrest occurred in New York as fans celebrated the Rangers' victory over the Vancouver Canucks in the Stanley Cup finals. It was a different story in Vancouver, where rioting and looting left an estimated 200 people injured and more than 50 under arrest. Police said at least 21 face criminal charges. The most seriously injured was a 19-year-old who police earmarked as a ringleader of a group that started the trouble. Police fired a plastic bullet at the man, aiming for his chest.
SPORTS
June 15, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They shouted it through smiles and tears, in accents that rang of Brooklyn and the Bronx and the place they pronounce "Lawn Guyland." The 18,200 fans at Madison Square Garden spoke as one, singing a song they had rehearsed since 1940 but weren't entitled to perform until Tuesday. "We won the Cup!"
SPORTS
June 14, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plot is getting thicker. So is the tension. One day before a game that will be the New York Rangers' greatest triumph or their darkest hour, Coach Mike Keenan accused Jimmy Devellano, senior vice president of the Detroit Red Wings, of attempting to sabotage the Rangers' Stanley Cup hopes by starting rumors that Keenan will leave New York to join the Red Wings. Keenan's charge added a bizarre twist to an already strange series.
SPORTS
June 13, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One look at the grim expression worn by New York Ranger Coach Mike Keenan and one look at the smiling face of his Vancouver counterpart, Pat Quinn, told the story. The Rangers sense the Stanley Cup is slipping from their grasp, but they have been almost powerless to stop the Canucks. Their once-commanding 3-1 series lead has been erased by two convincing Vancouver victories, forcing them into a decisive seventh game Tuesday at Madison Square Garden.
SPORTS
June 11, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coach Mike Keenan of the New York Rangers, claiming reports he will leave for a general manager/coaching position in Detroit had undermined his team's chances of clinching the Stanley Cup, said Friday he has no intention of relinquishing his job. Keenan, speaking after the team's late-afternoon practice at the Pacific Coliseum, blamed an overly heightened sense of anticipation for the Rangers' failure to win the Cup in New York on Thursday night.
SPORTS
June 9, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Cater's name won't be engraved on the Stanley Cup if the New York Rangers win the NHL championship, but maybe it should be. If not for Cater's interest in hockey, her son, Neil Smith, wouldn't have had anyone to shoot pucks at in their driveway as a child. And if not for that, Smith might not have grown up to become general manager of the Rangers, who can win their first Cup since 1940 with a victory over the Vancouver Canucks tonight at Madison Square Garden.
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