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NATIONAL
September 24, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
With the new school year comes a new furor in New York City over a program that makes emergency contraceptives , or so-called morning-after pills, available to girls as young as 14. The pilot program, which has been operating since January 2011, is part of the Connecting Adolescents to Comprehensive Healthcare program, or CATCH. It began with five schools in 2011, expanded to 14 and is now available at 13 schools, according to city officials. “In New York City over 7,000 young women become pregnant by age 17 - 90% of which are unplanned.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
October 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Weeks after a bruising teachers strike, the head of the Chicago school system stepped down, replaced by a new chief who immediately reached out to teachers. Jean-Claude Brizard resigned as Chicago Public Schools chief executive, and Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a longtime teacher and administrator, was named as his replacement, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced at a news conference on Friday. Byrd-Bennett had been more visible during the recent round of contract negotiations than her predecessor.
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NATIONAL
February 24, 2012 | Times staff and wire reports
New York City's Department of Education on Friday released rankings of thousands of teachers based on student test scores, ending a battle that pitted the teachers union against news organizations and parent groups who argued the public's right to the data outweighed privacy concerns. "The Department of Education should be ashamed of itself," Michael Mulgrew, president of New York's United Federation of Teachers, said in a statement, accusing officials of using "bad tests, a flawed formula and incorrect data to mislead tens of thousands of parents about their children's teachers.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
With the new school year comes a new furor in New York City over a program that makes emergency contraceptives , or so-called morning-after pills, available to girls as young as 14. The pilot program, which has been operating since January 2011, is part of the Connecting Adolescents to Comprehensive Healthcare program, or CATCH. It began with five schools in 2011, expanded to 14 and is now available at 13 schools, according to city officials. “In New York City over 7,000 young women become pregnant by age 17 - 90% of which are unplanned.
NEWS
June 2, 1986 | Associated Press
The Board of Education has agreed to test a proposal that pupils be allowed to progress at their own pace in grades one through three, the United Federation of Teachers said Sunday. The plan was offered by union President Sandra Feldman and accepted by schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones, spokesmen for the union and Board of Education said. "There is nothing sacred about yearlong grades," Feldman said.
OPINION
December 12, 2008
Education was relegated to the outskirts of the presidential campaign this year, always a fourth or fifth runner-up to such pressing matters as the economy, Iraq and healthcare. With few people asking penetrating questions on the issue, Barack Obama was able to sound as though he sided both with traditionalist teachers unions and with accountability-minded reformers. Now that it's time to name an Education secretary, no one is sure in which direction he's headed.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Weeks after a bruising teachers strike, the head of the Chicago school system stepped down, replaced by a new chief who immediately reached out to teachers. Jean-Claude Brizard resigned as Chicago Public Schools chief executive, and Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a longtime teacher and administrator, was named as his replacement, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced at a news conference on Friday. Byrd-Bennett had been more visible during the recent round of contract negotiations than her predecessor.
NEWS
March 5, 1996 | Associated Press
New York Gov. George Pataki proposed a measure Monday that would give teachers the authority to banish students from classrooms for up to 10 days for violent behavior or simply for failing to follow an order. Pataki also wants to give all school principals the authority to suspend disruptive students and double to 10 days the amount of time a student can be suspended without a hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1993 | From Religious News Service
As Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition moves forward with its national campaign to attack liberalism at the grass roots, his organization is touting its controversial school board campaign in New York City as a high-water mark of religious and ethnic cooperation. At a news conference here Wednesday, black and Jewish leaders weighed in with endorsements of the coalition's campaign of indirect support for candidates who bring "traditional values" into the schools.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2010
New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg named a top publishing executive Tuesday to head the nation's largest school system, after announcing that the city's longtime chancellor was stepping down. Bloomberg said Hearst Magazines Chairwoman Cathie Black would replace Joel Klein, who has overseen the city's 1.1 million-student school system since 2002. Klein said he was leaving to become an executive vice president at News Corp. The mayor said Klein had been looking to leave for a while but stayed until a replacement had been found.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2012 | Times staff and wire reports
New York City's Department of Education on Friday released rankings of thousands of teachers based on student test scores, ending a battle that pitted the teachers union against news organizations and parent groups who argued the public's right to the data outweighed privacy concerns. "The Department of Education should be ashamed of itself," Michael Mulgrew, president of New York's United Federation of Teachers, said in a statement, accusing officials of using "bad tests, a flawed formula and incorrect data to mislead tens of thousands of parents about their children's teachers.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
It isn't just the issues of women's health, medical insurance and contraception that have lately irritated relations between church and civil authority. In New York City , a lengthy battle over church usage of public property has raised another front in a fight that has its roots in how society chooses to organize itself. Approximately 60 churches, mainly small Christian denominations, use space in the New York public schools for their Sunday worship services. The space would normally be vacant because schools are usually closed for classes over the weekend.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Some encouraging news on the childhood obesity front: Obesity levels among kindergartners through eighth-graders in New York City have gone down, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. The decline, says the report, is to date the largest drop on record in a large U.S. city in this population, and it may be due to a comprehensive intervention that included the tried-and-true recipe of better food and more physical activity. The CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released today finds that, from 2006 and 2007 to 2010 and 2011, obesity prevalence in kindergartners through eighth-graders in city public elementary and middle schools declined 5.5%, from 21.9% to 20.7%.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Cathie Black, the high-profile magazine executive hand-picked by New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg to run the nation's largest school system, resigned Thursday after three tumultuous months on the job. The departure — Bloomberg said it was by mutual agreement — marked one of the more embarrassing episodes of the billionaire's three terms in office. Bloomberg, heralded by himself and others as a manager's manager who had brought business discipline to government, installed Black with virtually no consultation or any sense of political support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2011 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The New York City school system can publicly release performance ratings for more than 12,000 teachers based on their students' test scores, in what would be the largest such disclosure in the country, a Manhattan judge ruled Monday. The interests of parents and taxpayers outweigh the privacy rights of public employees, said Manhattan Judge Cynthia S. Kern. "The public has an interest in the job performance of public employees, particularly in the field of education," Kern wrote.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
At first, Cathie Black, the newly appointed chancellor of New York's public schools, stuck out like a homecoming queen who'd been assigned to take over the math club. She appeared as glossy as the Hearst magazine empire she long ran ? camera-ready, exquisitely dressed and well-spoken. She was just what New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg thought he needed to further repair the nation's largest public school system. The only problem: She hasn't a whiff of education experience. That has blown up into an unexpected firestorm not just over the quality of this city's schools ?
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | From Associated Press
Ramon C. Cortines, the former school superintendent in San Francisco, was selected Monday to lead New York City's million-student public school system. The Board of Education, divided on the same lines that sent former Chancellor Joseph Fernandez packing, voted, 4 to 3, on a resolution to offer Cortines the job. Cortines, 61, said that if all goes according to schedule, he will be in the city for the opening of the fall term on Sept. 9.
NEWS
January 20, 2002 | From Associated Press
The student accused of shooting two classmates at a high school had taken a gun into the building through an unattended side door, police said. Vincent Rodriguez, 18, was arraigned Saturday on charges including two counts of attempted murder. He was ordered held without bail pending a court appearance Wednesday. The shooting took place Tuesday in a hallway at Martin Luther King Jr. High School in Manhattan. Police said it appeared Rodriguez shot the two because they had teased his girlfriend.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2010
New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg named a top publishing executive Tuesday to head the nation's largest school system, after announcing that the city's longtime chancellor was stepping down. Bloomberg said Hearst Magazines Chairwoman Cathie Black would replace Joel Klein, who has overseen the city's 1.1 million-student school system since 2002. Klein said he was leaving to become an executive vice president at News Corp. The mayor said Klein had been looking to leave for a while but stayed until a replacement had been found.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2010 | By Tina Susman
Homemade spinach pies are out; packaged baked potato chips are in. Mom's pumpkin bread is out; Kellogg's Pop-Tarts are in -- but they must be the whole-grain brown-sugar cinnamon variety. At public school bake sales, Pop-Tarts are among 29 items the Department of Education has deemed nutritionally sound enough to sell in lieu of homemade goods, which have been banned in part because they do not list nutritional content. Parents say the regulation, issued last month, pushes kids to eat processed food and undercuts parental efforts to teach nutrition at home by outlawing homemade goodies like organic popcorn balls and vegan cookies, which they argue are healthier than anything housed in a vending machine.
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