Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNew York Shakespeare Festival
IN THE NEWS

New York Shakespeare Festival

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Papp, a giant of the American stage who brought free open-air productions of Shakespeare to two generations of theatergoers, created the nation's most important showcase for new playwrights and launched such Broadway hits as "A Chorus Line" and "Hair," died Thursday in his New York City apartment. Papp, who had suffered from prostate cancer for five years, was 70.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1993 | AILEEN JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
Was JoAnne Akalaitis an artistic director who never smiled and who alienated mainstream audiences with her grim play choices? Or was she the sort who brought ailing people chicken soup and made audience-building decisions, only to be done in by an impatient and unkind board of directors?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1990 | Compiled by Deborah Sakamoto
BROADWAY Opened Shubert Theatre: July 25, 1975. Scheduled Broadway closing: March 31, 1990. Total performances, as of March 31: 6,014. Total members of the Broadway company over 15 years: 511. Total N.Y. attendance: 6,543,058 (as of Feb. 19). Producers: New York Shakespeare Festival, Plum Prods. (Michael Bennett).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1993 | JOSEPH C. KOENENN, NEWSDAY
A major shake-up in the New York Shakespeare Festival is expected to see director George C. Wolfe replace JoAnne Akalaitis today as boss of one of Manhattan's most prestigious and productive theater companies. Akalaitis has been artistic director since August, 1991, shortly before festival founder Joseph Papp died.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Filling In: Michael Greif, a resident director at the New York Shakespeare Festival, will stage a revival of Joe Orton's "What the Butler Saw" at La Jolla Playhouse's Mandell Weiss Forum July 26-Aug. 30, filling the final slot to be announced for the summer season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Such Sweet Sorrow: The New York Shakespeare Festival announced that it will lay off 30 employees due to diminished government funding and will close its sound, lighting, set and prop departments. The festival currently employs 123 people and has an annual budget of more than $14 million. Festival producer Joseph Papp said that he expects city and state funding to shrink by up to 20%. The layoffs should save the festival an estimated $750,000 a year, he said.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York theater producer Joseph Papp turned down a $50,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant Thursday and said he would reject another $400,000 he expected to receive as a protest over anti-obscenity provisions imposed on the arts agency by conservatives in Congress. Papp's decision was disclosed in a letter he sent from his New York Shakespeare Festival to NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1993 | JOSEPH C. KOENENN, NEWSDAY
A major shake-up in the New York Shakespeare Festival is expected to see director George C. Wolfe replace JoAnne Akalaitis today as boss of one of Manhattan's most prestigious and productive theater companies. Akalaitis has been artistic director since August, 1991, shortly before festival founder Joseph Papp died.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1993 | AILEEN JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
Was JoAnne Akalaitis an artistic director who never smiled and who alienated mainstream audiences with her grim play choices? Or was she the sort who brought ailing people chicken soup and made audience-building decisions, only to be done in by an impatient and unkind board of directors?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing "A Chorus Line" on Broadway is proving almost as difficult as it was to open it 15 years ago. Faced with a booming box-office response to the March 31 closing notice that was posted in February, producer Joseph Papp said Thursday that the longest-running show in Broadway history will extend its nearly 15-year run at New York's Shubert Theatre to April 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Filling In: Michael Greif, a resident director at the New York Shakespeare Festival, will stage a revival of Joe Orton's "What the Butler Saw" at La Jolla Playhouse's Mandell Weiss Forum July 26-Aug. 30, filling the final slot to be announced for the summer season.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Papp, a giant of the American stage who brought free open-air productions of Shakespeare to two generations of theatergoers, created the nation's most important showcase for new playwrights and launched such Broadway hits as "A Chorus Line" and "Hair," died Thursday in his New York City apartment. Papp, who had suffered from prostate cancer for five years, was 70.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York Shakespeare Festival founder Joseph Papp, ill with cancer and distraught over the death of his son, has relinquished his administrative duties effective immediately, the festival said Wednesday. A spokesman said Papp had appointed JoAnne Akalaitis, a prominent stage director and Papp's artistic associate, to replace him as artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Such Sweet Sorrow: The New York Shakespeare Festival announced that it will lay off 30 employees due to diminished government funding and will close its sound, lighting, set and prop departments. The festival currently employs 123 people and has an annual budget of more than $14 million. Festival producer Joseph Papp said that he expects city and state funding to shrink by up to 20%. The layoffs should save the festival an estimated $750,000 a year, he said.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York theater producer Joseph Papp turned down a $50,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant Thursday and said he would reject another $400,000 he expected to receive as a protest over anti-obscenity provisions imposed on the arts agency by conservatives in Congress. Papp's decision was disclosed in a letter he sent from his New York Shakespeare Festival to NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1990 | Compiled by Deborah Sakamoto
BROADWAY Opened Shubert Theatre: July 25, 1975. Scheduled Broadway closing: March 31, 1990. Total performances, as of March 31: 6,014. Total members of the Broadway company over 15 years: 511. Total N.Y. attendance: 6,543,058 (as of Feb. 19). Producers: New York Shakespeare Festival, Plum Prods. (Michael Bennett).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York Shakespeare Festival founder Joseph Papp, ill with cancer and distraught over the death of his son, has relinquished his administrative duties effective immediately, the festival said Wednesday. A spokesman said Papp had appointed JoAnne Akalaitis, a prominent stage director and Papp's artistic associate, to replace him as artistic director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Caroline McWilliams, an actress and director best known to television audiences for her work on the series "Benson" and "Soap," has died. She was 64. McWilliams died Feb. 11 at her home in Los Angeles from complications of multiple myeloma, her family said. Caroline Margaret McWilliams was born April 4, 1945, in Seattle but grew up in Barrington, R.I. She graduated in 1966 with a bachelor's degree from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Her first break on television was on "Guiding Light," a longtime CBS soap opera in which she appeared for several years beginning in 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing "A Chorus Line" on Broadway is proving almost as difficult as it was to open it 15 years ago. Faced with a booming box-office response to the March 31 closing notice that was posted in February, producer Joseph Papp said Thursday that the longest-running show in Broadway history will extend its nearly 15-year run at New York's Shubert Theatre to April 28.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|